Disinformation by MOIS,Disinformation Campaign,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,PMOI

OPCW session in the Hague

U.S. Ambassador Says Iranian Regime Violated Chemical Weapons Treaty

OPCW session in the Hague

An extraordinary session of member-states of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in The Hague-November 2018

The Iranian regime has long relied on policies of appeasement by Western countries to facilitate its destructive and illegal weapons programs. Over the past two years, however, the United States and some European countries have begun to reconsider these policies because it has become impossible to ignore the regime’s atrocities at home and abroad.

Violations of OPCW

The most recent example of the regime’s blatant disregard for the international community occurred a few days ago when the U.S, ambassador to the Netherlands Kenneth Ward accused the Iranian regime of failing to declare its weapons-related activities. This was in direct violation of Iran’s agreement with the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW).

Iran has been a signatory to the 193-member Chemical Weapons Convention since 1997. The anti-chemical weapons group is managed by the

OPCW.

Ambassador Ward made this allegation at the fourth annual meeting of the intergovernmental organization in The Hague. He said that he is concerned that Iran is developing “central nervous system–acting chemicals” for offensive military purposes.

Ambassador Ward cited three examples of the Iranian regime’s violations of the treaty. Iran failed to declare its capability to fill weapons with chemicals, it didn’t announce the transfer of chemical-filled shells to Libya in the 1980s, and it currently markets CR gas as a riot control agent at defense expos.

The Washington Post reported in 2011 that

chemical munitions uncovered in Libya in 2011 appeared to have originated in Iran.

Damage Control by the Regime

Regime officials scrambled to deny the accusations and shift the blame. Bahram Qasemi, Iranian spokesperson for the regime’s Foreign Ministry said in his denial, “The reason for such claims is animosity towards the Iranian people.”

Regime Foreign Minister Javad Zarif ominously tweeted that the accusation against the regime was “dangerous.”

Previous Attempts to Blame the MEK

The Iranian regime’s attempts to shift the blame in regard to their use of chemical weapons is not new. In the 1980s, the regime used chemical weapons during the Iran/Iraq War and claimed the MEK was responsible for the attacks.

The MEK released a statement in 2004 revealing that the regime planned to use lawyers to pin the blame for the atrocities it committed in Halabja during the Iran-Iraq war on the Iranian opposition.

The regime’s chemical attack on Kurdish dissidents in Halabja during the final days of the Iran/Iraq War was the largest chemical weapons attack against a civilian population in modern history, according to the Federation of American Scientists. At least three thousand people died during the poison gas attack.

The chemical attack was planned by the Iranian regime to kill off Kurdish dissidents during the chaos of the final days of the war, but the regime successfully used propaganda to convince the world that Saddam Hussein was responsible for the attack. Later it became more convenient to accuse the MEK of carrying out the attack instead.

A year after the MEK warned that the regime planned to blame the MEK for the chemical attack, French lawyer of the former Iraqi head of state Emmanuel Ludot revealed that the Iranian regime’s ambassador to France, Sadeq Kharrazi,  had asked him to blame the gassing of the Kurdish dissidents on the MEK. In an interview with the Franco-English television network, ARTE, Ludot said, “The Iranian ambassador told me [to] say Iranians did not gas the Kurds … [that] this was the work of the MEK.”

Ludot gave another interview to Al Jazeera later that year, where he said: “I want to tell you a secret that may have dire consequences for me. The Iranian ambassador asked me personally to the embassy… the Ambassador told me to let’s make an agreement. We will say that Saddam didn’t attack the Kurds with [chemical] gas and you say that the Iranians didn’t attack the Kurds with gas. Then we will present a case that the PMOI has used these gases against the Kurds. Thus, the guilt will be on someone else and all of us will be safe. What do you think?”

The regime’s attempts to cover up its crimes have become more obvious to the international community. The world is becoming less willing to look the other way while the mullahs commit atrocities and pass the blame to its most convenient enemy. The Iranian regime poses a danger to the world.

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Inflation on the rise in Iran

Inflation Rises Again While the Regime Refuses to Address Iran’s Economic Crisis

Inflation on the rise in Iran

Photo Credit-tradingeconomics.com: The annual inflation rate in Iran has increased to 36.9 percent in October of 2018.

New findings from the Iranian Statistical Center indicate that inflation is up 34.9% from last year’s levels. Between October 23rd and November 22nd, the average family had to spend 34.9% more than they did last year to buy the same goods.

This also represents an increase in last month’s inflation rate, which was 32.8%.

International observers and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) predict that Iran’s rate of inflation will increase by a staggering 40% next year. They both also predicted a sharp increase in unemployment by 13% or 14%.

The predictions align with the People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran’s (MEK’s) own reporting, which predicted a “tsunami of poverty” to strike Iran in the latter part of 2018.

Iran’s Economy is Shrinking

The IMF estimates that Iran’s economy will shrink by around 1.5% at the end of 2018, and by 3.6% in 2019. However, the reality could be far worse. The IMF basis its predictions on government figures, many of which are deliberately manipulated to hide the full extent of Iran’s economic woes.

Steve Hanke, an economist at Johns Hopkins University has called the economic situation in Iran, one “of the worst government-induced inflationary regimes in the world”. Hanke estimates that only Venezuela suffers from a higher rate of inflation.

Worsening Purchasing Power

The economic situation in Iran has gotten so bad that many Labor activists estimate that most workers can only provide 50% of their families’ basic needs.

The mullahs and their clerical regime have demonstrated virtually no economic acumen or experience. They have not implemented a single economic policy designed to lift Iran’s economic standing. The mullahs’ only response to the deepening poverty gripping the country has been to offer “support packages”.

These packages are small cash boosters provided to people who earn less than 3 million toumans. Given the surging inflation rate, even with these meager offerings, most workers are fighting for their survival.

Alireza Fathi, a board member for the Tehran Islamic Council of Workers said, “workers have been abandoned until the point of an [economic] earthquake when they are forgotten forever”.

There have been reports of many of Iran’s workers resorting to extreme measures when faced with financial ruin. In some regions, workers have sold organs to keep a roof over their heads. Elsewhere, workers are committing suicide due to the stresses induced by living in abstract poverty.

According to a state-run news site, suicides are up by 71% in men and 66% in women on last years figures.

Amin Montazeri, the head of the Crisis Committee of the Labor Council said, “many show their reaction by attempting suicide or lashing out against others”. Drug addiction rates in Iran are also rising alongside the country’s inflation rate as workers turn to narcotics to escape the realities of their existence.

The Regime’s Coverup

Part of the regime’s inability to address Iran’s spiraling economic problems stems from its inability to acknowledge the severity of the situation. The Iranian Statistical Center’s findings now prove beyond any doubt that the mullahs’ claims of keeping inflation under control are blatantly false.

Fathi said, “not only is there no policy to control prices, but also the head of state clearly states that we have no problems”.

Without admitting there is a problem, the regime is condemned to inaction and Iran’s economy is doomed.

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Deadly Earth quake shakes Kermanshah province again.

One Year On, Many Iranians are Still Dealing with the Consequences of the Devastating Earthquake

Deadly Earth quake shakes Kermanshah province again.

A 6.3 magnitude Earth-quake hit Western Iran- in the same area that it hit last year, leaving over 600 injured and killed and many still missing

As Iran passed the one-year anniversary of its devastating earthquake, many survivors are still struggling to put their lives back together.

The earthquake-ravaged Iran’s Western provinces, killing more than 600 people, leaving more than 100,000 families without shelter, and extensively damaging more than 1,930 villages. Among the worst affected were the cities of Qasr-e Shirin, Salas-e Babajani, and Sarpol-e Zahab.

One Year on and Survivors Continue to Struggle

MEK sources inside Iran report, many of the survivors that saw their homes reduced to rubble are still without shelter one year on from the disaster. The authorities have been unable to provide them with accommodation and some are forced to set up makeshift camps in cemeteries.

One young woman told Iran’s state-run media, “I am sick and tired of this life. Twice, I attempted to commit suicide to get rid of this life. I wish I could die and be relieved of so much pain”.

The woman is tending to her sick child, whose life-saving treatment costs 150,000 toumans a day. She says, “I cannot do anything. I am sick, myself”.

Another 60-year-old woman spoke about how she is forced to live in a cemetery despite having open-heart surgery less than one year ago. “There is not even a drop of warm water so that we can bathe”, she said, adding, “we have received no aid from the government. Nothing!”

Sarpol-e Zahab’s City Council Chairman criticized President Hassan Rouhani for the government’s inaction over the desperate situation.

“The mental situation of the citizens is very troubling. Hygiene and sanitation are very inadequate, and the municipality hasn’t yet given us any money to do something. I wish the Ministry of Interior would say what services they’ve provided for a city like Sarpol-e Zahab”, he said.

In some extreme cases, reports have emerged of Iranian citizens selling kidneys to pay for the reconstruction of their homes.

Winter is Coming

With winter fast approaching, nobody wants to spend the cold months living in makeshift shelters. But the government’s efforts have been utterly inadequate.

Contractors employed to rebuild the affected areas have abandoned their projects after receiving no payment. Citizens are not even able to receive access to loans from banks to rebuild their properties. The government promised loans to help the victims rebuild their properties, but they never materialized.

Agencies that pledged to stand with Iran’s affected citizens soon left the areas, having achieved little, and abandoning many to their fate.

The Iranian opposition, the People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK) refuse to abandon the desperate citizens. The president-elect of the Iranian opposition, Maryam Rajavi issued a statement this week calling on Iran’s public to stand with those affected.

It read, “rush to the aid of our afflicted compatriots struck by [the] earthquake”. She mentioned Sarpol-e Zahab by name, imploring the Iranian youth to do all they could to assist those struggling.

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Iran Protests continue in Haft-Tappeh and Ahvaz

Head of Iranian Regime’s Judiciary Threatens Striking Workers

Iran Protests continue in Haft-Tappeh and Ahvaz

Despite the Iranian regime’s crackdown on protesters in Haft-Tappeh and Ahvaz, the protests continue.

After weeks of strikes by the Ahvaz Steelworkers and Haft Tappeh Sugar Factory workers, the regime has resorted to desperate measures to end the strikes and prevent the protests from spreading further. On November 26th, Sadegh Larijani, the head of the regime’s judiciary, addressed the protesting workers in comments that were broadcast by the state-run ILNA news agency. Larijani threatened the striking workers, saying, “We must deal with those who want to disrupt the order of the country, under the pretext of pursuing the demands of workers.”

Larijani also referred to the strikes as sedition. He said, “Workers should not allow their demands to be an excuse for the use of enemies and to create disorder.” He then added: “Workers will never meet their demands with turmoil, crisis and actions countering the public order.”

Despite these threats from the head of the regime’s judiciary, Ahvaz steelworkers continued their strike for the third week. The striking steelworkers also faced a large security presence, including state security forces, anti-riot guards and plainclothes officers, but they refused to allow the regime’s suppressive forces to intimidate them. The workers gathered once again in front of the regime’s governorate in Ahvaz, broke through a blockade made by suppressive forces and rallied in the streets of Ahvaz. The workers were joined by Ahvazi youth in their rally. They chanted, “We stand, we die, we get our rights!”

“The worker dies; he does not accept humiliation!”

“Our enemy is here, they claim falsely that it is the United States!”

“Government, Mafia, happy marriage!”

Meanwhile, the Haft Tappeh Sugar Mill factory workers continued their strike for the 22nd consecutive day. The tireless workers rallied again in the city of Shush, chanting, “The worker dies; he does not accept humiliation!”

“Death to the oppressor, greetings to the worker!”

“Imprisoned worker must be freed!”

Steel, Haft Tappeh, unity, unity!”

The MEK and the Iranian Resistance support the striking workers. Mrs. Maryam Rajavi, the leader of the Iranian Resistance, has voiced her support of the striking workers and urged others to join them in solidarity.

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The European Parliament delegation meets with Maryam Rajavi

Delegation from European Parliament Meets with Maryam Rajavi in Tirana

The European Parliament delegation meets with Maryam Rajavi

A delegation consists of 2 MEPs and the former chair of European Parliament’s official Delegation for Relations with Iraq meet with Maryam Rajavi, the president-elect of the Iranian opposition

On Sunday, Mrs. Maryam Rajavi, President-elect of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), met with a delegation of Members of European Parliament (MEPs) in Tirana to discuss Ashraf 3, the MEK camp in Albania. They also discussed the ongoing protests in Iran.

Members of the delegation included Tunne Kelam, member of the Foreign Affairs Committee and Vice Chair of Friends of a Free Iran inter-parliamentary group, Jaromir Stetina, member of the Foreign Affairs Committee and Vice Chairman of the Subcommittee on Security and Defense, and Struan Stevenson, Coordinator of the Campaign for Iran Change.

The meeting with the delegation from European Parliament followed a statement of support for the Iranian Resistance from 150 MEPs written earlier this month. The statement described the widespread protests that have taken place in Iran since December of last year, saying, “The social atmosphere is volatile, and people demand fundamental change. The regime’s officials have acknowledged the role of “resistance units” of the opposition PMOI [MEK] in organizing protests and nationwide strikes.”

The statement went on to describe the regime’s efforts to defeat the MEK and the Iranian Resistance through terrorist acts: “Unable to defeat the protesters at home, the regime launched a new wave of terrorism against the democratic opposition activists in Europe and in the United States.”

The MEPs concluded their statement with a call to action: “We must hold the Iranian regime accountable for its terror plots and expel Iranian Intelligence Ministry operatives from Europe. We must also condition our relations with Iran to an improvement of human rights and women’s rights, and a halt to executions.”

The EP delegation noted the statement from earlier this month and affirmed their support of Maryam Rajavi and the Iranian Resistance.

Mr. Tunne Kelam expressed his admiration for the MEK members at Ashraf 3 during the meeting, noting their “wonderful advances in building this place in such a short period of time and on the other hand, their livelihood and joy.” He added, “To me, this is a promise that the people of Iran will achieve their freedom.”

Kelam also congratulated Mrs. Rajavi on the MEK’s progress, saying, “Your movement has set a new moral, political and democratic standard, something that gives you the power to confront the medieval, fundamentalist regime ruling Iran.
At the same time, Mrs. Rajavi and the PMOI [MEK] have provided moral and political inspiration for hundreds of European political leaders in supporting PMOI’s [MEK’s] struggle for freedom in Iran. European politicians have been encouraged to take a strong and principled political stand versus the appeasement policy.”

Mr. Stetina pointed out that the MEK and the NCRI enjoys broad support from MEPs from different political groups, saying that these groups “are confident that Iran’s future is tied to this Resistance and to you, personally.” He went on to say, “This is why the Iranian regime has once again resorted to terrorism. Their ill-fated terrorist attempts in Albania, France, and the U.S. clearly show that the Iranian regime views this movement as its main existential threat. When it cannot defeat the PMOI and the NCRI by suppression and terror, it moves full force to deploy the mercenaries and “reporters” it has trained to demonize the Resistance and carry out smear campaigns. This is something that we have very well experienced in the European Parliament.

Mr. Stevenson pointed out that the regime is faltering and cannot continue to rule. “The emphases by the leader, president and other officials of the regime leave no doubts on the role of the PMOI in advancing the popular uprisings. Therefore, there is nothing strange for us that their slander machine has been put to work at its highest speed. These efforts are in vain and will not deceive anyone,” he said.

Mrs. Rajavi thanked the MEPs for their support of the Iranian Resistance and explained the current situation in Iran. “Despite massive repression, widespread arrests and murders in detention projected as suicides,” she said, “the Iranian people’s uprisings have continued ever since they started in the final days of last year, becoming ever more organized. The growing trend of strikes, protests, and demonstrations by workers, farmers, and other toiling sectors have sounded the alarm bells for the regime, bringing closer the prospects of victory of freedom and democracy over the dark religious tyranny that has invaded our homeland for four decades.”

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Protests continue in Ahvaz and Shush

Factory and Steel Workers Continue Their Strikes Despite Repressive Measures by Iranian Regime

Protests continue in Ahvaz and Shush

The protest by workers of Fulad-Ahvaz and their families and other fellow citizens continue despite heavy security measure by the repressive regime.

Saturday marked the 15th consecutive day of strikes for Ahvaz Steelworkers and the 20th consecutive day of strikes for the Haft Tappeh sugarcane factory workers. The striking workers have continued to stand up for their rights despite repressive actions by the Iranian regime, based on reports from the MEK sources inside Iran.

Ahvaz Steel Workers

The striking Ahvaz Steelworkers rallied on Saturday in front of the governorate in Ahvaz and marched toward the Pol Sefid. Police confronted the workers and assaulted some of the protesters in an attempt to stop the demonstration, but young people who had joined the protest in support of the striking workers forced the police to retreat. The protesters chanted “Lest we are humiliated!” as they marched to Naderi Street.

Haft Tappeh Factory Workers

Also on Saturday, the Haft Tappeh sugarcane factory workers gathered in front of the governorate in Shush to protest the recent false statements by the regime’s Deputy Minister of Labor. The deputy minister claimed that the workers had all received their unpaid wages and returned to work and that the strike was over. The striking workers responded to these lies with a rally. They made banners reading, “Imprisoned workers must be freed!” The workers chanted, “Even if we die, we will get our rights!” The MEK network shared video of the protests on social media.

Regime authorities arrested 19 Haft Tappeh factory workers for taking part in the strikes and protests. After their fellow workers pushed back and rallied for their colleagues’ release, the regime relented and released 14 of the workers. Five of the factory workers are still detained.

Maryam Rajavi Salutes Striking Workers

Mrs. Maryam Rajavi, President-elect of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), commended the striking factory and steel workers for continuing their strikes despite the regime’s repressive measures. She further called upon all the people of Khuzestan to stand in solidarity of the oppressed workers and to support their strike. She specifically called upon the youth of Iran to support the striking workers.

Mrs. Rajavi also called upon trade unions and workers’ rights activists to condemn the labor policies of the Iranian regime and to support the workers’ strikes in Iran. The MEK has pledged its support for the striking workers.

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East Isfahan farmer's protest for water rights.

Iran: Farmers in Isfahan Wear Grave Shrouds to Protest for Water Rights

East Isfahan farmer's protest for water rights.

The Farmers in East Isfahan on their 65th day of protest for their water rights

On Friday, the farmers of Khourasgan, Isfahan Province, marked their 65th day of protests with a demonstration at Khourasgan’s fruit and vegetable market.

The MEK sources in Iran report that on Thursday, farmers in East Isfahan donned white vests symbolizing grave shrouds to protest for water rights. The farmers wore the grave shrouds while they attended the Mahdieh Mosque in East Isfahan and then held a session to discuss the farmers’ concerns. The act was meant to convey the message that the farmers are ready to stand up for their rights, no matter the cost.

Farmers in Koushk, Goldasht and Jozdan, in West Isfahan also held protests.

The farmers in Isfahan Province are protesting because of a lack of access to water for their crops due to mismanagement of water resources by the Iranian regime over the past two decades.

The Zayanderud River once flowed through Isfahan, providing the farmers in the region with ample water to farm their crops. But over the past two decades, the regime has built factories upstream of Isfahan and diverted the river to other regions. These practices, along with a prolonged drought, have caused the river to dry up before reaching Isfahan. Now the once-prosperous farmers of Isfahan can no longer sustain their crops.

Farmers in the region have protested numerous times over the past year in defense of their right to water, but the regime has failed to make meaningful changes. To date, none of the promises made by government officials have been fulfilled.

Regime’s Incompetence Forces Once Prosperous Isfahan Farmers into Poverty

Several months ago, Isfahan’s farmers protested during Friday prayers by turning their backs to the prayer leader and chanting, “Back to the enemy, face to the country!” Since then, this chant has spread to other protests across Iran.

Isfahan’s primary industry is agriculture, so the lack of access to water affects virtually everyone in the province. The farmers of Isfahan place the blame for the situation squarely at the feet of the regime and its leaders, who have mismanaged Iran’s water resources for decades. The MEK has called Iran’s water crisis one of the country’s “super challenges.” It is clear the mullahs have no plan to address this crisis.

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Protest continues by Haft-Tappeh and Fulad Ahvaz workers

Protests Continue to Rage in Ahvaz and Shush

Protest continues by Haft-Tappeh and Fulad Ahvaz workers

Despite the crackdown on peaceful protesters of Haft-Tappeh sugarcane factory and Fulad Ahvaz, their protests continue

On Saturday, November 24th, the protests at the Haft Tappeh sugarcane factory and the Ahvaz Steel company reached their 20th and 15th days respectively.

Haft Tappeh

The Haft Tappeh workers initiated a walkout and protest almost three weeks ago over unpaid wages, deteriorating working conditions, and the forced privatization of the company. Both the workers and the factory itself are on the brink of bankruptcy, with many reporting being forced to purchase basic essentials on credit from local stores.

After several of their numbers were arrested, the protestors took their chants and slogans to the Shush governor’s building to demand their immediate release. Following intense international scrutiny and domestic public pressure, the regime released 14 of its 19 prisoners, however, four labor representatives and a civil rights activist remain in regime custody.

It is still unclear on what grounds they are being held. The regime has not revealed their charges.

Ahvaz Steel Company

Meanwhile, in Ahvaz, the workers at the Ahvaz Steel Company were facing down regime officials as well. They too have suffered economically due to unpaid salaries.

After the workers took their demonstration to the Khuzestan governate, regime officials opened channels of negotiations with the workers. However, they would not be fed lies and false hope. They made it clear they would not end the protest until they saw evidence of concrete actions designed to improve their working conditions and alleviate their financial hardship.

Rising Anti-Regime Sentiment

Like many other protests in recent years, including among Iran’s truck drivers and teachers, the strikes took a decidedly anti-regime tone.

In Shush, protestors from Haft Tappeh chanted “imprisoned workers must be freed”. In Ahvaz, the workers chanted “we will fight against tyranny”. These chants are significant as it shows a break with protests in the past, which have focused on specific demands and grievances.

While both protests are seeking a resolution from the regime to pay out their unpaid wages, they are also both part of a wider Iranian movement calling for the regime to be held accountable for its tyrannical and financial ruinous policies that have plunged Iran into an economic freefall.

Government mismanagement and corruption has increasingly taken center-stage at protests since the nationwide protests in December and January, in which the People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK) played a major role.

In Shush, the workers at Haft Tappeh called on their fellow citizens to rise up and join them, a sentiment echoed by the leader of Iran opposition, the President-elect Maryam Rajavi. Some days, the workers were joined by merchants, teachers, taxi drivers, and local residents. A feeling of solidarity is beginning to emerge as local residents provide the workers with meals and taxi drivers are providing free rides.

In Ahvaz, a similar situation is emerging. The people know that their grievances cannot be resolved under this corrupt and greedy regime. Their wages will remain unpaid. The mullahs and their cronies will only get richer, while the rest of Iran struggles to stay afloat.

It is clear, regime change is the only option remaining, a fact that is increasingly dawning on both the Iranian public and the regime itself. History is in the making in Ahvaz and Shush. The mullahs will no doubt try to contain the situation. It is up to the rest of Iran to ensure that their voices and their protests will not be contained. They will be heard and their grievances will be addressed.

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Haft-Tappeh's workers protest continues

MEK Network: The Haft Tappeh Protest Reaches Its 19th Consecutive Day

Haft-Tappeh's workers protest continues

The Haft-Tappeh worker’s protest, demanding the release of detained workers continued on its 19th day-November 24

The brave protestors at Haft Tappeh continued their strike for the 19th consecutive day. The sugar factory workers braved the rain to protest unpaid wages and the forced privatization of the company.

Ismael Bakhshi imprisoned worker of Haft-Tappeh Sugarcane factory

The Worker’s representative in Haft-Tappeh Sugarcane factory, who is in custody for demanding the worker’s unpaid wages-November 2018

The workers took their protest to the Shush governor’s office to call on the regime authorities to release the detained workers’ representative, Ismael Bakhshi.

The workers came together in chants of “the jailed worker must be released”, as many carried black umbrellas for protection against the elements.

The oldest sugar factory in Iran

Haft Tappeh has been an iconic building for Iran’s sugar industry. It is the oldest sugar factory in the country, having been in operation for more than five decades.

However, in recent years the workers’ working conditions have deteriorated dramatically. In 2015, the factory was part of a forced privatization project which saw ownership transferred to its new owners.

Since then, the workers have reported unpaid wages, the reduction of its permanent workforce, and reduced rights and pensions.

“The families of some workers have to buy bread on credit because of unpaid salaries and if this situation continues, even bakeries will refuse to sell their bread to workers on credit”, said Jafar Azimzadeh, a trade unionist.

Like many of Iran’s key industries, the privatization efforts have merely served to make the managers richer and the workers poorer.

Under such appalling financial and working conditions, many of the workforces are resorting to extreme measures. In one high-profile case in February, Ali Naghdi, a worker at the Haft Tappeh factory, was found dead in a canal. It is believed he committed suicide due to his escalating debts and unpaid wages.

The mass detention of workers

The regime marched against the protestors on the 14th day of strikes and arrested 19 protestors and their supporters. Among those arrested was Sepideh Ghelian, an activist and journalist who was protesting with the workers of Haft Tappeh.

In the days following the arrests, the regime released the majority of those arrested. Only Ghelian, Bakhshi, and three other workers’ representatives remain in custody. It is unclear on what grounds the regime is holding them on. A lawyer representing the four labor representatives told sources that he did not know what charges they were facing.

He said, “I still don’t know [details] of the security charges that the court announced”.

This is not the first time the Haft Tappeh workers have gone on strike. In August, the workforce walked out over unpaid wages. The regime’s response then was similar to now. Five workers were arrested on charges of “disrupting order”.

The Iranian opposition has pledged its support to the brave factory workers. The People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK) has expressed its solidarity with the brave men and women. The president-elect of the Iranian opposition, Maryam Rajavi took to Twitter to offer words of support for the brave workers and encourage international human rights groups, trade unions, and NGO’s to lend their support.

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Public hanging in Iran

Three Iranians are Publicly Executed in Shiraz

Public hanging in Iran

A scene of a public hanging in Iran.

On Wednesday, November 21st, as the morning sun beat down on the beige buildings, three blindfolded men were led into the middle of a public square. Around them, masked men readied several nooses. Another masked man shouted their charges through a megaphone.

The three prisoners, the masked man exclaimed to the small group gathered in attendance, were accused of “moharebeh” or “fighting with God”. The charge is increasingly being used by the clerical regime in Iran to arbitrary try its political opponents.

In December, a court upheld the death penalty for Swedish resident, Ahmadreza Djalali over the same accusations. Several arrested during the December and January protests have also been charged with the same “moharebeh” umbrella charge.

The three men in Shiraz are forced aboard trucks, carefully positioned so the flatbeds lie underneath the pre-arranged nooses, on their flanks are three further masked men. Escape is not an option.

In a brutal act of suppression and violence, the three men were hanged in the sunlit square, in full view of the Iranian public.

A Regime in Crisis

The events that took place on Wednesday in Shiraz are not an isolated incident. Across Iran, unlawful public hangings like these are becoming increasingly common. Between January and June this year, the clerical regime executed 176 Iranian citizens.

The increasing use of the death penalty, including in cases against minor offenders who committed their crimes under the age of 18, is a sign of the increasing peril the regime finds itself in.

Alongside the surge in executions, has been a surge in anti-regime protests. Most recently, the brave workers at Haft Tappeh sugar factory took to the streets over the regime’s forced privatization of the company. Similar, the workers at Ahvaz Steel also went on strike in protest over the regime’s oppression and mismanagement.

The Iranian regime has always responded to civil unrest with violence and repression. The People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK), Iran’s largest and most popular political opposition group, was on the receiving end of this violence and oppression every time it threatened the regime’s future in power.

The most violent of all these responses took place in 1988 when the regime executed more than 30,000 MEK members in regime custody.

International Condemnation

In response to the Iranian regime’s widespread use of violence and executions to ensure its future survival, international NGOs and human rights groups have lined up to condemn the mullahs and their Supreme Leader Khamenei.

U.N. Censures Iranian Regime for Human Rights Abuses for 65th Time

The MEK, the Iranian resistance, the High Commissioner for Human Rights, the Special Rapporteur on human rights in Iran, and the rapporteur on arbitrary executions have all spoken out against the regime’s arbitrary application of the death penalty.

They have called for the immediate cessation of this medieval and inhumane form of punishment.

Staff Writer

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