Posts Tagged ‘Iran Womens Rights’

Human Rights,Iran human rights,Iran Womens Rights,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,PMOI

Execution of women in Iran continues.

The Regime’s Misogynist and Inhumane Use of the Death Penalty

MEK supporters during a rally ask for an end to executions in Iran

On October 26, 2018, Iranian state news reported that the regime had executed the 88th woman under President Hassan Rouhani. The woman, identified only as Soudabeh, had been imprisoned for 12 years after standing accused of murder. It is still unclear where the execution took place.

The execution came just a few weeks after the UN Human Rights Commissioner Michelle Bachelet criticized the regime for the high volume of executions. Bachelet reiterated that the UN opposes executions in all circumstances. It reminded the regime that no jury in the world is immune from making mistakes.

Women Facing the Death Penalty

Across Iran, dozens of women are on death row. Many are accused of political crimes, including for supporting opposition group the People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK).

Others are facing charges for murder in self-defense or during episodes of domestic violence. Under the extreme laws of the Iranian regime, in cases of murder carried out for self-defense, the victim must face charges and retribution for the killing.

Eight women are on death row in Iran’s infamous Urmia Grand Central Prison. Their names are:

  1. Chenar Salehi,
  2. Yasna Sadeqi,
  3. Arasteh Ranjbar,
  4. Nazdar Vatankhah,
  5. Tahmineh Danesh,
  6. Farideh Hassanpour,
  7. Shelir Khosravi,
  8. Somayeh Ebrahimzadeh.

A further eleven women face the death penalty in Varamin’s Qarchak Prison. Their names and charges are as follows:

Azam Maleki has been detained for eight years, charged with the murder of her brother-in-law and nephew-in-law.

Narjes Tabaii has been detained for three years, charged with the murder of her husband’s second wife.

Fereshteh Shirazi has been imprisoned for five years, charged with the murder of her mother-in-law (the victim was the sister of Assadollah Lajevardi, the infamous warden at Evin Prison known as ‘the Butcher’).

Tahereh Noori has been detained for 12 years, charged with the murder of her husband.

Roya Amirian has been detained for 14 years after allegedly murdering a man harassing her in the street.

Mahtab Shafii has been detained for three years, charged with her husband and mother-in-law’s murders.

Mahboubeh Rasoul, has been detained for seven years, charged with the alleged killing of her mother-in-law.

Mahnaz Agahi, has been imprisoned for seven years, charged with murdering her husband.

Soghra Eftekhari, has been imprisoned for ten years, charged with murder during a conflict.

Eshrat Nazari, has been imprisoned for six years for allegedly killing her husband; Samira Sabziyan.

Misogyny has been enshrined and institutionalized in the regime’s laws. Many other countries, even those with capital punishment laws, protect women from receiving the death penalty when they are acting in self-defense against an abusive family member. However, the Iranian regime affords the victims no such protection.

The names of these women in Qarchak should be a beacon for human rights groups around the world. They illustrate inhumane and unjust laws employed by the Iranian regime and highlight the growing need for penal reform and the abolishment of the death penalty across Iran.

Staff writer

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Human Rights,Iran human rights,Iran Opposition,Iran Womens Rights,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,Struan Stevenson

Struan Stevenson holds his book "Self Sacrifice"

Struan Stevenson:Good news, The Opposition is Headed By a Charismatic Female Leader Maryam Rajavi

Struan Stevenson holds his book "Self Sacrifice"

Struan Stevenson, Former MEP and the Coordinator of Campaign for Iran Change, holds his book on his experience with MEK.

On Tuesday, February 26, 2019, Struan Stevenson, a former member of the European Parliament (MEP) and frequent Iran commentator wrote his latest piece for UPI. His op-ed called on women in the West to lend their support to Iranian women in their fight to break free from the repressive policies of the Iranian regime.

Stevenson calls Iranian women, “among the most repressed in the world, ruled by a regime dominated by elderly, bearded misogynists.”

For this reason, Iranian women have played a central role in the Iranian opposition movement. They have been central figures in the protest movement that has swept across all 31 of Iran’s provinces. “Female teachers, medical staff, students, factory workers, and pensioners have taken to the streets to demand an end to corruption, and an end to discrimination and repression and an end to the clerical regime’s aggressive military adventurism across the Missile East,” Stevenson writes.

Leading Figures in the Calls for Regime Change

The largest voices in the calls for Iranian regime change come from the most influential and popular opposition group, the People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK). Within the MEK, many of the senior leadership is made up of women. Its leader, the president-elect Maryam Rajavi, is also female and is held in high esteem by political figures from around the world.

Women, in particular, have been mobilized by the regime’s repressive policies and discriminatory practices towards women. Stevenson describes some of these laws, “in Iran, women are considered the property of their closest male relative and have no legal rights. Girls of 9 can be married off by their parents.”

In the Iranian legal system, evidence provided by a woman is worth half that provided by a man. As a result, women cannot charge a man with rape unless they have four credible witnesses, a near impossibly high standard.

A Violent and Aggressive Brand of Fundamentalism

Prior to the 1979 revolution that brought the mullahs and their regime to power, Khomeini criticized the Shah’s permissive attitude towards women voting. He cited an extremist interpretation of Islamic teaching and called gender equality a “defiance of some of the explicit commandments of the Qoran.”

Following the revolution, as expected, Khomeini retracted many women’s rights. The regime prevents females riding bicycles, forces them to wear the hijab, and scrutinized the way they dress.

Under the clerical regime, gender violence has drastically increased. Stevenson says, “girls who were deemed to be improperly dressed in the street have suffered horrific acid attacks and stabbings, in assaults openly condoned by the mullahs.” Even something as innocuous as dancing or singing on social media can be enough to get a girl flogged or fined.

Women Around the World Should Stand with Iran’s Women

In a public statement, the former first lady of Algeria, Anissa Boumediene pledged her support to Maryam Rajavi and the MEK. The statement read, “yes, we stand with you Maryam, as we stand with all our Iranian sisters in your fierce fight seeking to free Iranian women from what enchains and imprisons them.”

Stevenson concludes, “her words should resonate in the West, where female politicians and activists must show solidarity with their oppressed and brutalized Iranian sisters.” They can do this by pledging support to Maryam Rajavi and the MEK, who are fighting tirelessly for freedom, gender equality, and democratic secularism for Iran to give the nation’s daughters a brighter future.

Staff Writer

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