Posts Tagged ‘Iran Uprising’

1988 Massacre,Human Rights,Iran human rights,Iran Protests,Iran Uprising,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI),NCRI,PMOI,Warsaw Conference,Warsaw Ministerial Conference

MEK rally demanding the NCRI to be recognized as the viable democratic alternative to the religious dictatorship in Iran

MEK Holds Rally in Warsaw to Mark Four Decades of Regime Atrocities Prior to Warsaw Summit

MEK rally demanding the NCRI to be recognized as the viable democratic alternative to the religious dictatorship in Iran

Simultaneous to Warsaw Summit, the MEK supporters gathered near where the conference will be held to express the Iranian people’s devotion to freedom and democracy and demand an end to the policy of appeasement-February 13, 2019

On February 13, 2019, the Iranian opposition came together with communities in Europe and held a rally in Warsaw in solidarity with the Iranian people of Iran.

The event marked four decades since the Iranian Revolution in 1979 that ousted the Shah and brought Khomeini to power. Under the mullahs and Khomeini, the Iranian state derided religious plurality, shunned secularism, and abandoned any commitment to upholding human rights.

Instead, the Iranian state embraced repression, violence, torture, capital punishment, terrorism and war.

A Regime on the Brink of Collapse

Now, forty years later, the regime is creaking under the same weight that ousted the Iranian monarchy; the will and determination of the Iranian people.

In 2018, a wave of popular protests swept across Iran, igniting unrest in all 31 of Iran’s provinces and 142 cities, and towns. Like in 1979, these protests drew support from all walks of Iranian life, including the working classes that the clerical regime has relied on for support.

Teachers, farmers, factory workers, students, investors, pensioners, and bazaar merchants have all turned out to vent their frustrations and participate in anti-regime protests.

The driving force behind these protests has been the unrelenting determination of the People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK). Led by president-elect Maryam Rajavi, MEK members have risked their freedom and their lives to coordinate protests, counter the mullahs’ propaganda and disinformation, and stand up for Iranian human rights both within Iran and abroad.

In a statement ahead of the Warsaw rally, Iranian Communities in Europe called the MEK a “pivotal force of the political alternative for future Iran”.

A Rally to Recognize the Iranian People’s Right to Resist

The Warsaw rally takes place ahead of the anticipated Warsaw conference, in which governments from around the globe will meet in Warsaw to discuss strategies to deal with the Iranian threat.

For Iranian Communities in Europe and the MEK, the rally in Warsaw ahead of the conference was necessary to demonstrate to the international community the importance of recognizing the Iranian people’s right to resist and overthrow the regime’s tyrannical brand of religious fascism.

The statement from rally organizers read, “it is time to put an end to four decades of political and social repression, massacres, plunder of Iran’s wealth by the regime’s cronies, and misery and war forced upon the region by this regime.”

“We call on the West to impose sanctions on the regime and include the Iranian regime’s IRGC and MOIS and perpetrators of crimes against the Iranian people on the EU terror list.”

The statement concluded, “It’s time for European countries to align their voices with the voice of the Iranian people and resistance, and to end the nightmare of four decades of the Iranian regime’s atrocities in Iran, the region and the world.”

Staff Writer

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

Ashraf 3,Free Iran 2018,Ingrid Betancourt,Iran Protests,Iran Uprising,Maryam Rajavi,Mujahedin-e Khalq,NCRI,PMOI

Colombian-French politician, Ingrid Betancourt, and the former presidential candidate in Colombia addresses MEK members in Ashraf 3

Ingrid Betancourt to MEK Members: “We are going to win this”

Colombian-French politician, Ingrid Betancourt, and the former presidential candidate in Colombia addresses MEK members in Ashraf 3

Ingrid Betancourt, the Colombian-French politician, and the former presidential candidate in Colombia speaks at the International Conference of the Iranian Communities, held in Ashraf 3, MEK’s residence in Albania- December 2018

Colombian-French politician, Ingrid Betancourt and the former Colombian presidential candidate, addressed members of the People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK) and their allies in Albania, emphasizing that “Time has changed. You [the MEK] are the hope, Maryam [Rajavi] is the leader and we are with you and we are going to win this” referring to MEK’s struggle to free Iran.

Betancourt expressed her gratitude towards the Albanian government and delight at what she said was a “very special moment” for her.

“Many years ago we were fighting for your lives when you were in Camp Liberty and we were feeling the despair and the rage of being caught in that horrible situation where we were surrounded by lies and… the only thing we could do was [cry] for help and [denounce] what was happening”, she said, adding, “to see you here in this land that has welcomed you with open arms… thank you, Albania. Thank you”.

She expressed her warmth towards the country. “I feel at home because I see that this is a country that has decided to take the good side of the choices of options in life”, she said.

“What Albania has done… has gained the respect of all the international community”, she proclaimed.

The Phoenix Rising from the Ashes

Betancourt described how she had insisted that on this visit to Albania, she would not stay in a hotel, but she wanted to be with the MEK members at their Ashraf 3 compound outside Tirana.

She described how she had “been walking the streets of this new city”, adding, “I’m so proud to be here with you.”

Following the Iranian regime’s mortar attacks and liquidation of the Camps of Ashraf and Liberty in Iraq, in which many MEK members lost their lives or were badly wounded, the MEK fled to Albania.

In just 12 months, the group has built a sprawling compound, aptly named Ashraf 3. The compound has its own water purification facilities, dormitories, dental center, pharmacies, bakeries, a sports complex, library, meeting hall, and learning centers.

Betancourt marveled, “You are like the phoenix that rises from the ashes and this Ashraf is telling me the power that is in you”.

“You have built a community of people”, she continued, “that are committed to fighting for a free Iran.” Betancourt expressed her delight at the “city” under construction at Ashraf 3, where MEK members and supporters from around the world are united in their passion and desire for a free Iran.

A Direct Threat to the Mullahs’ Future in Power

The resilience and determination on display across the MEK is a direct threat to the mullahs’ future in power in Iran.

“Can you imagine”, Betancourt asked, “what it is for the government of Iran, the regime of the mullahs, every day looking at the newspapers and finding out that there is a riot somewhere in some place in Iran?” “Every day you are reminding them that they have no right to be at the head of the state in Iran”, she added, “every day, you are reminding them that it’s going to come to an end”.

Without the MEK, the protest movement in Iran would not be possible. “It’s because you are here, organized, with the plan… with a strategy, with a leader like Maryam Rajavi”, that the people of Iran feel empowered to take to the streets.

Maryam Rajavi, the Iranian opposition leader, takes a photo up with distinguished speakers at the International Conference against Iranian regime’s terrorism and violations of human rights, in Ashraf 3, Albania-December 15, 2018

Betancourt described how Maryam Rajavi disarms the regime’s terrorism and violence with love. “Love is the one that will bring Iran to freedom”, Betancourt asserted.

The Tables Have Turned

Betancourt described how just five years ago, the MEK was fighting to get its name removed from international terror lists in the West after Western government included the pro-democracy group on the lists to appease the mullahs.

“Now it is them who have to explain”, Betancourt clamored. After several foiled terror attacks in Europe, the French and Albanian governments have expelled diplomats. The French President Emmanuel Macron ordered for the freezing of assets owned by the Iranian Ministry of Intelligence (MOIS)

Betancourt continued, “now it’s them who fear”. “They are fearing that they will be brought to justice. And this is our commitment. We are going to make sure that we free Iran and that we bring them to international justice”.

Finally, Betancourt concluded, “We want them to be in jail for all the crimes they have committed”.

Staff Writer

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

Ahvaz,Ahvaz Protests,Haft Tapeh Sugarcane Factory workers strike,Haft-Tappeh,Iran human rights,Iran Protests,Iran Uprising,Isfahan,Kazerun,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,MEK Network,Mujahedin-e Khalq,PMOI,Regime Change

The protester that raises her arm as a symbol of resistance, while stepping out of teargas

One Year Later: A Summary of Protests in Iran in 2018

The protester that raises her arm as a symbol of resistance, while stepping out of teargas

The photo symbolizes the December 2017 uprisings in Iran that has not stopped and has continued in forms of protests and strikes across the country.

December 28th marks the one year anniversary of the nationwide uprising that mobilized people from all walks of life to take to the streets in protest of Iran’s theocratic regime. The protests began in Mashhad on December 28, 2017, and spread to over 140 cities in every province in Iran over a two week period.

The initial protests were in response to the economic disaster facing the country. Poverty, corruption, inflation, and rising unemployment drove many Iranians into the streets to protests. But as the uprising grew in strength and numbers, the demonstrators began to protest the regime itself.

Protesters chanted, “Death to the dictator!”

“Death to [Supreme Leader] Khamenei!”

“Khamenei shame on you, let go of your rule!”

One year later, Iran is still the scene of daily protests and demonstrations against the authoritarian regime. The protesters have made it clear that they will not be satisfied until the ruling regime is toppled and democracy is restored to Iran.

The MEK has played a leading role in the protests taking place across Iran. As the movement to topple the mullahs’ regime has grown, the people have sought a viable alternative to the corrupt dictatorship that has destroyed Iran’s economy and environment, and that has oppressed its people for the past four decades. The MEK offers a democratic alternative that will restore freedom to Iran.

Iran News Wire summarized protest activity in Iran over the past year. The following is a summary of their report:

January

Recorded Protests: 643

Daily Average: 21

The uprising that began in December 2017 continued into January, and protests took an anti-regime turn in the month of January. Protesters set fire to Basij bases and tore down images of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei.

February

Recorded Protests: 596

Daily Average: 21

March

Recorded Protests: 422

Daily Average: 14

April

Recorded Protests: 452

Daily Average: 15

May

Recorded Protests: 1,093

Daily Average: 35

June

Recorded Protests: 475

Daily Protests: 16

 

In June, bazaar merchants in Tehran launched a large-scale strike in protest of the failing economy and rising prices. Protesters in Khoramshahr took to the streets to protest water scarcity.

Protests quickly turned to calls for regime change, with chants of “Death to the Dictator!”, “Death to Rouhani!”, “Death to Khamenei!”, and “Our enemy is right here, they lie when they say it’s the U.S.!”

Women played a key role during the protests in Khorramshahr and in Khuzestan in southwest Iran.

July

Recorded Protests and Strikes: 970 in cities and regions

Daily Average: 31

August

Recorded Protests: 133

Daily Average: 20

September

Recorded Protests: 1,367 in 293 cities, villages and business and industry regions

Daily Average: 46

Iran’s truck drivers began their nationwide organized strike in September.

October

Recorded Protests: 1,533 in 323 cities, villages, and business and industry regions

Daily Average: 49

October saw the most protest activity in Iran in 2018. Truck drivers, teachers, and bazaar merchants all went on strike in October.

November

Recorded Protests: 911 in 171 cities, villages, and business and industry regions

Daily Average: 30

Iranian truck drivers went on another round of strikes in November, as did Iran’s teachers.

The workers of the Haft Tappeh Sugarcane Factory workers in Shush and the Iran National Steel Group workers in Ahvaz also began striking in protest of months of unpaid wages. Their weeks-long strikes would attract international attention.

Head of Iranian Regime’s Judiciary Threatens Striking Workers

December

Recorded Protests: 273 as of December 21st

Daily Average: 9

Workers, credit union clients, retirees, students, and prisoners all protesters during the month of December.

The regime arrested a number of striking Ahvaz steelworkers and Haft Tappeh factory workers in an escalation of their previous attempts to suppress the strikes. Regime agents carried out a series of midnight raids on the houses of striking workers and arrested dozens of workers. Reports indicate that labor activist Esmail Bakhshi was tortured in prison.

Iranian truck drivers started their fifth round of strikes this month as well. Those numbers are not included in the report, which will be updated by Iran News Wire in January.

Staff Writer

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

Ahvaz,Fulad Ahvaz,Iran Protests,Iran Uprising,Mujahedin-e Khalq,PMOI,Steelworkers protest

The 38th day of protest by SteelWorkers in Ahvaz

Iran: Ahvaz Steel Workers Continue Their Strike Despite Arrests of Dozens of Workers

The 38th day of protest by SteelWorkers in Ahvaz

The Iranian regime has cracked down on SteelWorkers by raiding the workers’ houses at night and arresting the leaders, despite, the protest continues into its 38th day.

Dozens of workers, protesters, and representatives of the Ahvaz Steel Factory have been arrested since midnight on Sunday, and arrests were ongoing as of Monday. So far, the names of 31 detainees have been published.

The arrests are part of an effort to suppress the steelworkers’ protests, which reached its 39th day on Tuesday. Repressive forces—including Ministry of Intelligence agents, riot police, and Revolutionary Guards—were positioned in strategic locations in Ahvaz in an attempt to prevent the steelworkers from continuing their protests.

The protesters persisted despite these measures, even though they were surrounded by suppressive forces in some areas. The workers vowed to continue to protest until their demands were met and their colleagues were freed. The workers chanted, “Imprisoned workers must be freed!”

The workers of the Ahvaz steel factory went on strike 39 days ago because they had not received their wages for several months. They have continued their strikes and protests despite continuous threats and acts of intimidation from the regime.

Workers from cities across Iran expressed solidarity with the striking steelworkers of Ahvaz, calling for the immediate release of the arrested workers. Among the workers expressing support were the Tehran Bus Company workers’ syndicate and truck drivers in various parts of Iran. Iran’s truck drivers have gone on strike four times this year because of low pay, rising fees, and hazardous conditions.

The MEK and the Iranian Resistance applauds the workers of Ahvaz for their persistence and strength and calls upon the workers, young people, and students of Iran, particularly those in Ahvaz and Khuzestan, to support the steelworkers of Ahvaz in their strike.

The MEK further calls upon international human rights organizations and workers’ rights advocates, unions, and syndicates to call for the release of the arrested workers, protesters, and representatives and to support the steelworkers in their protests.

The MEK and the Iranian Resistance say that the regime’s arrests of the protesting steelworkers are another sign of the mullahs’ frustration with the ongoing nationwide workers’ strikes.

Staff Writer

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

Channel 4 propaganda,Disinformation by MOIS,Disinformation Campaign,Iran Terrorism,Iran Uprising,Maryam Rajavi,Massoud Rajavi,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,NCRI,PMOI

Terribly biased article on the Guardian against the MEK

Falsehoods and Lies: Debunking the Guardian’s Piece on the MEK

Terribly biased article on the Guardian against the MEK

Biased article bashing the MEK in the Guardian raises outrage among the Iranian diaspora. The piece is considered a reaction to the recent surge in protests and strikes in the country and a preparation for more terrorist activities against the main opposition, the MEK.

Aaron Merat’s long-awaited hit piece was finally published in the Guardian on Friday. Under the headline ‘Terrorists, Cultists- or Champions of Iranian Democracy’, the piece pedaled the regime’s brand of lies and misinformation. It was a clear example of Tehran’s smear campaign against the People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK) that it has used to undermine the Iranian opposition and legitimize its use of violence against political dissidents.

The Death of Independent Journalism

Even before the article’s publication, the MEK expressed its misgivings over its content. MEK spokesperson, Shahin Gobadi, wrote two letters to the editor of the Guardian in recent weeks. In the letters, he aired his concerns over Aaron Merat’s ability to conduct objective journalism on the MEK.

Merat has close ties to the Iranian regime and its lobbyists. He worked for the Economist between 2011 and 2014, during which time he was an outspoken advocate for the regime. He has written previous articles with the explicit intention of demonizing the MEK and condemning the Iranian resistance.

Who is the MEK?

It came as little surprise then that his piece for the Guardian was no different. It was essentially a hit piece against the Iranian resistance group and was full of inaccuracies, falsehoods, and barely concealed attacks on the MEK.

In his very definition of who the MEK are, Merat is incorrect. He described the organization as a “fringe Iranian revolutionary group”.

The MEK is far from a “fringe” group. They are the oldest, largest, and most popular Iranian resistance group.

The group organized nationwide protests in January and December which spread across every major city in Iran. At its annual Grand Gathering event, it draws an attendance of more than 100,000 supporters, including high-profile political figures such as former New York mayor Rudy Giuliani, and President Trump’s National Security Adviser, John Bolton.

The Grand Gathering of over 100,000 MEK supporters at VillePinte Paris-June 30, 2018

The resistance group enjoys widespread support inside Iran and abroad.

Merat later seems to admit that the MEK does enjoy the support of international political figures but seeks to explain this by suggesting that the MEK pays “western political influencers fees to pen op-eds and give speeches”.

This is untrue. Professor Raymond Tanter debunked this myth with the help of the US Treasury Department. The Treasury Department investigated the allegations that its political figures had received cash to write opinion pieces and give speeches at MEK-organised events, but found them to be “unsupported claims”.

Ms. Somayeh Mohammadi

Merat’s piece begins by describing Mostafa and Robbie Mohammadi’s journey to Albania to “rescue their daughter”. Merat alleges that Ms. Somayeh Mohammadi, the couple’s daughter, is being held against her will by the MEK.

These allegations are false. Ms. Somayeh Mohammadi joined the MEK in 1990 and has been a member for more than two decades. She has previously been interviewed by Canadian and US officials, and each time she has maintained that she is in Albania working for the MEK out of her own free will.

Somayeh Mohammadi, one of distinguished members of MEK, now living in Albania

She has previously written a book about the regime pedaling lies about her situation and using her case to legitimize terror attacks against the MEK. She even went as far as to write an open letter to Albania’s Minister for Internal Affairs, Fatmir Xhafaj, publicly calling for an end to his lies.

Repeating Lies to Demonize the MEK

The Guardian piece goes on to blame the MEK for the deaths of six Americans in Iran in the 1970s.

However, subsequent investigations by both the US State Department and the Washington Post newspaper found this to be false. The 2005 State Department report clearly states, “a splinter organization with ties to Marxist groups in Cuba and Oman… appropriated and modified the MEK name and symbols, clashing with original MEK members, and killed Americans in Tehran”.

The report describes that the individuals responsible for the murders were later caught, tried, and executed for the killings.

Merat also attempts to blame the MEK for killing Iraqi Kurds in the North of Iraq. He claims Saddam Hussein used MEK members to quell the Kurdish armed resistance during the 1990 Gulf War.

The Kurdish Democratic Party (KDP) provided a written statement in 1999 that unequivocally stated the MEK was not involved in the killing of the Kurdish people. The statement read “the KDP can confirm that the Mujahedin were not involved in suppressing the Kurdish people neither during the uprising nor in its aftermath”.

Delisting the MEK as a Terror Group

Merat goes on to suggest that the MEK’s delisting as a terrorist group was not because the group was deemed mislabelled and was a non-violent organization, but because if the US didn’t delist them, the group would have been wiped out in Iraq.

Once again, this claim is unfounded. The Appeals Court for the D.C. Circuit actually threatened to court order Hillary Clinton’s State Department unless she removed the group from the country’s terror list.

Burying the Regime’s Terrorist Plots

Merat then furthers the regime’s interests by attempting to cast doubt over the regime’s terror activities in Europe. In June, European authorities foiled a plot to detonate a car laden with explosives at the MEK’s Grand Gathering in Paris.

After a thorough investigation, Assadollah Assadi, an Iranian diplomat working at the regime’s embassy in Vienna was found to have orchestrated the plot. The French government froze the assets of the Iranian Ministry of Intelligence.

Merat attempts to shift the blame away from the regime. He quotes the Iranian Foreign Minister directly in his piece, who called the allegations of the Iranian terror plot a “sinister false flag ploy”.

If the plot was nothing more than a “false flag ploy” it seems unlikely that the French government would have taken such forceful actions against the Iranian regime.

On top of seizing assets, the Emmanuel Macron’s government expelled an Iranian diplomat and is currently refusing to nominate a new French ambassador to Iran. France’s foreign ministry also confirmed that following its own investigation, it was in no doubt that the Iranian intelligence ministry was behind the June 30th terror plot.

The Regime is Fearful

Aaron Merat’s piece goes on to spout all of the regime talking points against the MEK. However, his piece does provide some insight into why the regime spends so much time, money and effort on demonizing the MEK and its supporters.

He wrote, “politicians openly called for bombing the Islamic republic, amid growing panic over Iran’s nuclear program- the existence of which had first been exposed by the MEK”. In this sentence, Merat demonstrates why the regime despises the MEK. It works tirelessly to bring the regime’s atrocities and illegal behavior to light.

Merat writes that the MEK and its supporters around the world “openly call for the overthrow of the Islamic republic and the installation of Maryam Rajavi as the leader of Iran”.

In this one aspect, Merat is correct. But in drawing this to attention, Merat is also drawing to attention why both he and the regime relentlessly pursue the MEK.

The MEK represents the single greatest existential threat to the mullahs’ regime. It has orchestrated nationwide protests that have crippled Iranian regime’s key industries. Even regime officials have admitted publicly that the MEK is a direct threat to the regime.

The MEK has resistance units working inside Iran, that mobilized in the nationwide uprisings in December and January of this year. This has the Iranian regime terrified and explains why they use mouthpieces like Aaron Merat to undermine and demonize the MEK in international media outlets.

New Report Details Iran Regime’s Demonization Campaign Against the MEK

The piece in the Guardian is little more than the mullahs lashing out at the MEK out of fear. The MEK is gathering momentum. Strikes and protests are now a daily occurrence in Iran and the mullahs future in power is growing more uncertain by the day. The fact is, regime change is on the horizon. When it comes, the world will look at Merat’s piece, and others like it and wonder how they got away with such blatant lies and deceit.

Staff Writer

 

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

Iran Protests,Iran Uprising,MEK,MEK Network,Mujahedin-e Khalq,PMOI

Looted credit firm clients demand their money back.

Looted Credit Firm Clients in Mashhad Demand Return of Their Savings

Looted credit firm clients demand their money back.

A group of looted credit firm clients protest outside one of the branches, demanding their savings to be returned to them.

On Thursday, clients of the regime-linked Padideh credit firm protested in Mashhad for the return of their looted savings. Suppressive forces were dispatched to prevent the protest from spreading, and several people were arrested after security forces attacked the demonstrators, report MEK network inside Iran.

The rally in Mashhad followed a similar rally on

Keshavarz Avenue in Tehran on October 14th by clients of the Padideh and Caspian credit firms.

Protesters at that rally chanted:

“We will sacrifice our lives for freedom! Down with this cruelty!”

“Our three branches pass us to each other, leaving us in limbo!”

“Hands behinds the scenes, what have they done with our money?”

“We shall fight, we may die, yet we will not accept living in shame!”

“Theft has become legal under the cloak of law!”

Hamidreza Jalalipour, one of the regime’s experts frequently cited by the regime, warned against the spread of protests like these, which is what the regime fears most.

In an interview on state TV, Jalalipour said: “We must answer to the people’s demands… you must answer so that the society becomes calm… If we don’t pay attention to these demands, it will become concerning and I can show how since last year these protest rallies are changing and these changes must be taken seriously.”

He went on to say: “In the past year, the people’s measures have changed… Just take a look, during the past year (and even during the 1979 revolution), we had never witnessed violence. However, in the protests of the past 12 months, we have been witnessing violence… people were angry, upset; they have difficulties, people have lost their money, yet banks were set on fire and they headed towards the prosecutor’s office… These are dangerous measures. These are concerning issues that we should be all worried about. The people’s measures must be responded to. It shouldn’t result in unrest, protests, and God forbid, violence, and then strikes… if you look at the big picture, things will get serious.”

Ahmad Hamzeh, a member of the regime’s Majlis (parliament), acknowledged that there was cause for alarm. He warned that widespread poverty could unleash a wave of jobless and hungry Iranians who would revolt.

“Do people have to pour into the streets for us to hear their voices?” he asked.

Staff Writer

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

Iran Economy,Iran Protests,Iran Uprising,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,PMOI,Regime Change,regime infighting

Infighting at Iranian regime's parliament

Shake Ups in Parliament Won’t Fix Corrupt Regime

Infighting at Iranian regime's parliament

The Iranian regime’s parliament infighting as a result of the growing discontent against the regime and its corrupt leaders.

A wave of impeachments is overtaking the Iranian regime’s parliament, as tensions among the regime leadership have reached a boiling point.

Minister of Work Ali Rabi-ee was dismissed three weeks ago. The Ministers of Industry and Education are set to be impeached on September 11th. Cabinet Minister Masoud Karbasian is going to be sacked by next month.

On August 28th, President Hassan Rouhani was summoned to Parliament to answer questions about Iran’s economy. Rouhani admitting the Iranian people’s discontent towards the regime said: “Economic issues are of determinative nature. However, what’s more important now is that many people have lost their faith in the future of our Islamic Republic and are doubting its power.” Rouhani’s visit to Parliament came after months of squabbling and power plays between parties.

Government officials in trying to put the blame on others have become increasingly willing to acknowledge that Iran’s problems stem from decades of corruption and mismanagement by the mullahs and not from the sanctions by the United States.

Member of Parliament Qasem Mirzaei Nikou said: “The fraudulent ways of money-making runs in all branches of the government. Their corruption is endless, much like a seven-headed dragon.”

The reality is that the impeachments will not solve Iran’s economic problems because the system is rotten to its core. Iranian regime’s economic policy is not based on the rule of law; it is based on greed and corruption. Even MPs agree that replacing the cabinet will not solve these problems.

On August 26th, Elias Hazrati another regime MP, commented on this issue: “We are in the month of August now. Sanctions won’t start until November, and its consequences won’t be revealed any earlier than the next 6 to 12 months. So, the current inflation of 19%, which is expected to go up to 40% by the end of the year, has clearly nothing to do with the United States”.”

Henchman, Mohammad Reza Badamchi another member of regime’s parliament, added: “In today’s society, one out of every six people is unemployed. In other words, close to 20 million of our youth, aged between 15 to 29 years old, have no jobs now.”

The cabinet, of course, only controls 50% of Iran’s economy. The other half is held by the Supreme Leader and the organizations under his power, primary the Revolutionary Guards and its affiliates.

Mahmoud Bahmani, another regime MP and the former head of the Central Bank, revealed last month: “A 2-year-worth of currency, accumulated from our exports, haven’t been returned to our country just yet. The bank accounts of the officials’ families are worth more than our currency held overseas. In March 2013, the liquidity rate was 435 thousand billion Toman, whereas today, it is more than 700 thousand billion Toman.”

Given the dire economic situation in Iran and the failure of regime officials to find effective solutions to address it, the Iranian people have grown more and more angry at the entire regime. Economic issues were the initial spark that led to the massive uprising that began in December of last year and continues today. People from all walks to life have taken to the streets, chanting, “Death to Khamenei!”

Khamenei you should be ashamed of yourself!”

Reformists, Hardliners, Game is Over!”

It has become clear that the people of Iran are tired of claims of reform. They are ready for regime change. Increasingly, protesters have looked toward the Iranian Resistance and the MEK for a viable alternative to the mullahs’ regime.

The regime faces many obstacles right now, but the largest and most insurmountable is the ongoing uprising taking place in the streets of Iran. The regime has been unable to suppress the protests, and it has been unable to kill off the opposition movement, despite attempted multiple terrorist attacks on the MEK this year.

Rouhani himself acknowledged the power of the protesters in a statement this year: “How did our country’s atmosphere suddenly change? It changed from December 26th, 2017; anyone who claims otherwise is only misleading people, in my opinion.”

The regime is fearful of its people because it knows the end is near. Overthrow is inevitable because the problems within the regime cannot be fixed. The people are angry, and the protesters cannot be suppressed. The regime should be afraid.

Staff Writer

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

Iran Protests,Iran Uprising,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,PMOI,Ramesh Sepehrrad

MEK Rally in support of IranProtests

New Study Suggests Revolution on Horizon in Iran

MEK Rally in support of IranProtests

MEK Rally in Paris, in support of Iran Protests-2018

A new study was written by Dr. Ramesh Sepehrrad, a scholar-practitioner at the School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution (SCAR) at George Mason University, published in the journal E-International Relations on May 21st draws attention to the growing unrest in Iran. The uprising that began last December gave voice to a growing number of Iranians who are tired of the regime’s shallow claims of reform and are demanding regime change. Sepehrrad’s paper discusses the roots of the uprising, the reason for its widespread impact, and its potential to start a revolution in Iran.

 

The scope of the Protests

 

According to Sepehrrad, the recent uprising in Iran began with a protest in the northeastern holy city of Mashad over rising food prices and quickly spread into a massive uprising that took place in 140 cities across Iran. During the two weeks before the regime temporarily suppressed the uprising, the scope of the protests grew from economic conditions to inequality, to corruption, and finally to calls for regime change.

 

The people protesting came from all walks of life, but the first protests were led by Iranians from the lower middle-class whose standard of living has decreased dramatically in recent years. They were joined by large numbers of women and youths who rose up in solidarity with those struggling through poor economic conditions. As the uprising grew, more people joined the ranks of protesters, including members of Iran’s many ethnic groups, including Turks, Kurds, Turkmen, Arab, Taleshi, Baluch, Lor, Bakhtiari, and Ghashghai, and the uprising began to look more like a coordinated effort and less like scattered protests. The regime attempted to paint the protesters as looters and criminals, but, as Sepehrrad wrote in her paper, this argument was invalidated by the fact that no looting occurred. The uprising was well-organized and goal-oriented, not a few protests by the poor and desperate.

 

Sepehrrad pointed out that Iranian regime’s Supreme Leader, Ali Khamenei later acknowledged the role of the MEK in the uprising in an attempt to frighten people and prevent further protests. The regime’s record of brutality to the MEK is well-documented. In the summer of 1988 alone the regime executed 30,000 political prisoners, most of whom were MEK members. By acknowledging the MEK’s role in the uprising, the regime hoped to discourage protesters who did not want to meet the same fate as the tens of thousands of MEK members who have been targeted by the mullahs, but instead, they inadvertently lent credibility to the resistance organization and its goal of regime change.

 

According to Sepehrrad, the December 2017/January 2018 uprisings were unique in several respects. For one thing, the protests were widespread, occurring in 140 cities over the course of two weeks. Protests occurred both in cities and in more rural areas. This was partially due to the use of social media, specifically Telegram, to spread the word of the uprisings. Government censorship efforts tend to cluster in the larger cities in Iran, so protesters in smaller cities were able to bypass state censors to get their message out in a way that would not have been possible in Tehran. The Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) is also more densely clustered in larger cities, meaning that protests in small cities were not quickly or easily suppressed before word could spread. In addition, the protests began because of frustrations with economic conditions. The poor are disproportionately located in smaller cities, so the places where protests could spread more easily were also the places where more people felt compelled to protest.

 

Sepehrrad found that protesters also utilized social media to collect data about the uprising. This information is an invaluable resource for predicting future acts of resistance by the people. Sepehrrad claims that the data gathered during the uprising shows a new model of protest in Iran that encompasses diverse groups and locations.

 

Sepehrrad also wrote about the unity shown by the protesters. People protested for many reasons, but all of the protesters were united by their desire for regime change. According to Sepehrrad’s research, 65% of protest signs seem during the uprising called for regime change. This was extraordinary for such a diverse group of people. The poor, women, young people, legitimate political groups, the labor movement, various ethnic groups, and representatives from every social class banded together to demand change. This sort of unity in protest has been seen historically in revolutionary settings.

 

The data collected during the uprising provided a picture of the protesters and their goals. Sepehrrad found four major themes in her analysis of the data.

 

  1. Unlike previous uprisings, the protesters in the recent uprising had no desire to negotiate with the regime for concessions. They demanded nothing less than regime change.
  2. The uprising was an organized nationwide movement, with protests occurring all over Iran, not just in the cities.
  3. Social media played a huge role in the uprising, in part because the protesters were able to flip the script and transfer the fear of retaliation from the protesters to the regime by documenting protests and communicating in a medium that could bypass the regime’s attempts at censorship.
  4. The unity displayed by a diverse group of protesters has unleashed sentiments of revolution across Iran.

 

Goals and Tactics of Protesters

 

Protesters shared the common goal of regime change, but Sepehrrad found that there were a number of different issues that led people to rise up. Economic conditions caused many people to rise up. The lower middle class made up a large percentage of protesters because this group has been forced into poverty by the regime’s policies. Under the ruling regime, economic disparities between regime officials and their families and the rest of the country have disillusioned many Iranians. The regime has been accused of financial corruption, leading to unequal access to wealth that has caused widespread poverty amongst Iranians. Numerous allegations of corruption by the members of the regime have been made, and these claims have been substantiated by a report by Transparency International, which ranked Iran 131 among 178 countries.

 

According to Sepehrrad‘s research, 40% of Iranian citizens in large cities live below the poverty line, and 60-70% of people in smaller cities and towns live in poverty. Young people, educated women, and college graduates are chronically unemployed or underemployed, with the regime acknowledging a 35% unemployment rate among the nation’s youth and a 52% unemployment rate among women.

 

In addition to the epidemic of poverty, Iran’s housing crisis has been unaddressed by the regime, leaving many living in dire conditions. Sepehrrad estimated that 25% of the population has been affected by this crisis. The environmental crisis caused by the regime has compounded the inhumane living conditions faced by the people. According to Sepehrrad, the regime’s mismanagement has led to the drying of 90% of the country’s wetlands, leaving many without access to water.

 

 

The Role of Social Media

 

 

The increased access to the Internet and social media drove many to demand change. Despite the regime’s efforts to censor online material, Iranians have found ways to connect with each other and the larger world. These people, particularly women and educated youth, see the disparity between the rights enjoyed by people in other countries and the oppression and inequality experienced within Iran. They protested for greater individual freedoms, freedom of the press and freedom of association.

 

According to Sepehrrad, the increase in access to online information has also given the Iranian people access to unbiased news, and not just the propaganda published by the state. This has drawn attention to the 1988 massacre of political prisoners, a majority of whom were MEK members. Some of the biggest sites of protests were in cities where mass graves of the executed 1988 political prisoners were located.

 

Sepehrrad added that increased access to social media has also led to greater awareness of the plight of political prisoners. Word travels fast on the Internet, and now when someone is detained for the crime of speaking their mind, the rest of Iran knows about it. Iran’s abysmal human rights record (17 out of 100 points, according to Amnesty International) has led many to feel that Iran is unreformable. For many, the only solution to Iran’s problems is regime change. This sentiment, expressed by a large and diverse group of Iranians spread across the country, is the main ingredient of a revolution.

 

Protests did not end when the uprising was suppressed and continue each day in cities across Iran. In late January of 2018, protesters began using a secure crowdsourcing tool to communicate with each other about upcoming protests, resistance efforts, and the current locations of security forces. They also take videos of events in Iran to share with the rest of the world.

 

Sepehrrad noted that the use of purposeful collective action has been a factor in the uprising and continuing protests. Protesters have unified to act against the state in a coordinated fashion. Sepehrrad wrote that targets of these actions include “local religious leaders and centers, security forces and personnel, government-controlled financial institutions and banks, judicial branches, and government offices.” Protesters have taken down and burned images of the Supreme Leader in numerous cities. This action, in particular, has energized the resistance movement. Collective action is still occurring in Iran as part of ongoing protest efforts.

 

The MEK’s Role in the Uprising

 

According to Sepehrrad and the regime itself, Tehran has placed responsibility for the uprising on the MEK, who did indeed play a large role in organizing protests. But the seeds of dissent have been present among the people of Iran for decades. The MEK is simply an expression of the dissatisfaction of the people with the current regime.

 

The usual practice of the regime is to violently suppress any dissent. But Sepehrrad noted that those calling themselves “reformers” have been more hesitant to violently act against their own people. The uprising has given these reformers pause, and they have had to backtrack on many of their “reformist” views because it is clear that the people are serious about regime change. Sepehrrad wrote that on January 24, 2018, one of the senior pundits of the so-called “reformist” faction admitted that these protests will come in waves and as they recede, “they will come back stronger.”

 

The MEK has long been a target of the regime’s wrath, wrote Sepehrrad, as they are the largest and oldest resistance movement in Iran and have had success in opposing the mullahs’ rule. The regime has spent significant time and political capital in an attempt to delegitimize the movement and have claimed repeatedly that the MEK has been diminished and has little influence or support from the Iranian people. But the recent acknowledgment by the regime of the MEK’s role in the growing unrest runs counter to their argument that the MEK does not speak for the people. The large and widespread uprising that took place clearly shows the will of the people, and their goals align with the MEK and its longstanding position that meaningful change can only happen with the end of the mullahs’ rule.

 

Conclusion

 

Sepehrrad’s paper demonstrates that the uprising and continuing protests in Iran are not scattered acts of resistance. The large-scale nature of the protests, their continuance despite attempts by the regime at suppression, their diverse makeup, and the unity displayed by the protesters point to revolution. The use of social media has made Iranians more aware of their shared concerns and has enabled them to organize more effectively. The people have no desire to negotiate with the regime. Their message is clear. Revolution is the only way to bring true reform to Iran. Sepehrrad’s paper may be read in its entirety on the E-International Relations website.

 

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

Iran Protests,Iran Uprising,Isfahan,MEK,PMOI,water rights

MEK-IRAN:WESTERN GOVERNMENTS MUST READ THE SIGNS OF IMPENDING CHANGE IN IRAN

MEK-Iran:Western governments must read the signs of impending change in Iran

MEK-IRAN:WESTERN GOVERNMENTS MUST READ THE SIGNS OF IMPENDING CHANGE IN IRAN

MEK-IRAN:WESTERN GOVERNMENTS MUST READ THE SIGNS OF IMPENDING CHANGE IN IRAN

Recent protests in Iran will have unearthed distant memories for the Iranian population. In late December 2017, and early January 2018, protests tore across the Iranian nation. The People’s Mujahedin of Iran (MEK) had a major role in organising the protests. The nation’s men, women, and youth from all walks of life took to the streets to express their desire for regime change. The urban middle classes stood alongside rural farmers and agricultural workers, along with the rest of the population, and came together in chants of “down with Rouhani” and “down with Khamenei”.

A reminder of distant memories

Iran has heard similar chants before. Forty years ago, in 1978, after the annual Nowruz celebrations, similar chants rang out across Iran. Nasser Razil describes how protestors gathered in Tehran, shouting “down with the Shah”. Then, as now, the country was in the grip of autocratic power, with a heavily oppressed population calling out regime change.

The parallels between the climate of 1978 and that which we see today are not limited to Iran’s internal political struggle. In 1978, western governments were convinced that the Shah would emerge from the protests with his regime intact. Just weeks before Nowruz, Jimmy Carter had called Iran an “island of stability in one of the more troubled areas of the world”. The UK Foreign Office also maintained a blind faith that the Shah was in control of the situation.

Foreign powers are not reading the signs

Fast forward to today, and the same attitude can be seen towards Iran from the western powers. There has been a prevailing school of thought in western governments that Rouhani’s oppressive regime has the support of the poorer classes and possesses the strength to whether the storm and put down the dissenting population.

This has clearly shown to be false. The recent protests indicate that the poorer communities have just as much desire for regime change as the urban middle classes. In Isfahan Province, it was the farmers that triggered mass public mobilisation in early April, disgusted at the regime’s inability to handle a water crisis. The recent protests raged for ten days, indicating that the regime could not quash the dissent. There were even reports of State Security Forces abandoning their posts and joining the protestors. The regime’s strength is evaporating, and there are clear signs that, like the Shah’s regime in 1978, it will not be able to maintain its grip on power for much longer.

Washington is currently re-examining its position on Iran. It will soon have to decide whether or not to adopt a firmer stance against the Iranian regime or continue with its policy of appeasement for the ayatollahs. The appointment of John Bolton as the new National Security Advisor to President Trump is a positive sign. He has long sympathised with the MEK and its leader Maryam Rajavi and will likely push for a harder stance towards the Iranian regime.

However, those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it. In 1979, when the Shah regime fell, western governments were in shock and were left scrambling to formulate a policy towards the incoming government. The same signs that were present in 1978 are visible today. Foreign governments must read them and react.

The Rouhani regime is losing its grip on power. All segments of the public have turned away from it and are crying out for regime change. The economy is still declining, and farmers have begun to strike and protest. The winds of change are on the horizon. Washington, London, and the other western governments must change their attitudes towards the regime in Iran. It will not be in power for much longer.

Staff writer

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

European Parliament support for Iran resistance,Iran Protests,Iran Uprising,Iran's opposition,MEK

European Lawmakers Voice Support for Iranian Uprising

European Lawmakers Voice Support for Iranian Uprising

European Lawmakers Voice Support for Iranian Uprising

European Lawmakers Voice Support for Iranian Uprising

197 European lawmakers signed a statement on Monday, March 20th,2018, in support of the Iranian people’s uprising for democratic change. The signatories come from across the political spectrum, with members of all political groups in the European Parliament represented. Several Vice-Presidents of the parliament and Committee and Delegation Chairs were among the signers.

 

The statement comes as a response to the nationwide uprising in Iran, which began on December 28, 2017 and lasted for almost two weeks before being suppressed by the ruling regime. The people of Iran, particularly the nation’s young people, demonstrated in favor of regime change, chanting “Down with the dictator!” “Down with Khamenei!” and “Down with Rouhani!”

 

Thousands of demonstrators calling for a free and democratic Iran and an end to fundamentalist rule were arrested. 14 protesters have since died after being tortured, leading Amnesty International to call for an investigation into the deaths of those in custody.

 

Many of the leaders and officials within the regime have talked about the role MEK, has played in organizing the protests and fomenting dissent against the ruling regime. The AFP reported that on January 2, Rhouhani asked French President Emmanuel Macron to take action against the Iranian opposition, which is based in Paris, accusing them of causing the protests. On January 9, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the Supreme Leader, said that the MEK has organized the uprising and implicitly threatened to execute the protesters. A judiciary official called for the execution of demonstrators, saying that they are “waging war against God.”

 

The statement released today condemns the use of force against demonstrators and calls on the European Union to create measures to compel the regime to release prisoners who were arrested in the uprising, “uphold freedom of expression and association,” and end the repression of women, particularly the compulsory Hijab. It also calls on the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to investigate Iran’s prisons and political prisoners, focusing in particular on those arrested during the recent uprising and those who died in detention.

 

The statement is critical of the European Union for its silence toward human rights violations in Iran and urges the EU to take decisive action. The statement is being released on the occasion of Nowruz, the Persian New Year.

Staff writer

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

Copyright © 2018 MEK-Iran.com. All Rights Reserved
Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial