Posts Tagged ‘Iran human rights’

Free Iran 2019,Human Rights,Iran human rights,Iran Protests,Maryam Rajavi,Massoud Rajavi,Mujahedin-e Khalq,PMOI,UPR - 33rd session

UPR Iran - Geneva - November 2019

U.N. Criticizes Iran’s Human Rights Abuses

UPR Iran - Geneva - November 2019

Universal Periodic Review on the situation of human rights in Iran-November 2019

On Tuesday, November 8, 2019, 111 countries participated in the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of the human rights situation in Iran. The UPR is a peer-review mechanism whereby the United Nations member states can make recommendations to governments that are under review.

The Working Group in Geneva on Tuesday had a lot to say about the regime’s treatment of women, the execution of minors, the use of torture, and overall human rights abuses, making a total of 329 recommendations to the Iranian regime.

The recommendations made by the Working Group of the UPR were adopted on November 12th at a meeting of the U.N. Human Rights Council. The MEK has reported previously that the U.N. has condemned the Iranian regime 65 times over the last four decades for its human rights abuses.

Recommendations Made

A number of countries called on Iran to ratify the

Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW).

Denmark, Estonia, and Moldova recommended that the regime ratify the Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.

Germany called on Iran to

“ratify core international human rights conventions, in particular, the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.”

Germany also called on the regime to

“establish a formal moratorium on the death penalty. In particular, cease all planned executions of juvenile offenders and prohibit the imposition of the death penalty for crimes committed by minors.”

Albania called on the Iranian regime to cooperate with all U.N. Special Rapporteurs who wish to visit the country.

Sweden agreed, saying that Iran must “fully cooperate with and grant immediate and unfettered access for the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran.”

Belgium recommended that Iran should

“abolish the death penalty at least for crimes committed by persons under 18 years of age, in accordance with its obligations under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and commute all death sentences for juvenile offenders.”

The United States called on the Iranian regime to immediately end the use of torture and to credibly investigate and prosecute all allegations of torture.

Ukraine called on Iran to

“remove all national law provisions that allow for punishments that amount to torture or cruel and degrading treatment.”

Australia said Iran must

“Immediately investigate all allegations involving the torture and other ill-treatment of those arrested or detained during the demonstrations in December 2017 and hold those responsible to account.”

Australia also called on the regime to

 “guarantee the rights to freedom of expression, association, and assembly, and release political prisoners, including women’s rights activists, labor rights activists, environmentalists, scholars, lawyers and journalists, detained for exercising these rights.”

The United Kingdom called on Iran to

“Immediately demonstrate that all detainees in prison are neither tortured nor subject to cruel or inhumane treatment or punishment.”

Switzerland called on the Iranian regime to

“release all persons detained for exercising their rights to freedom of expression, association, and peaceful assembly, and repeal or amend laws and other provisions criminalizing or restricting the exercise of those rights.”

Argentina said Iran must

“guarantee freedom of expression, particularly of men and women human rights defenders and journalists, and repeal legal provisions that affect these rights.”

 

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

1988 Massacre,Human Rights,Iran human rights,Iran Opposition,Iran Protests,Iran Uprising,MEK,MOIS,Mujahedin-e Khalq,People's Mojahedin organization of Iran,PMOI

Hassan Heidari, the young poet, killed by MOIS agents in Ahvaz

MEK: Protests in Southern City of Ahvaz (Shadegan)

Hassan Heidari, the young poet, killed by MOIS agents in Ahvaz

Hassan Heidari, the young poet, killed by the MOIS agents in Ahvaz

Following the dubious death of a young poet, Hassan Heidari, 29, on Monday, November 10, angry people took to the streets in Shadegan-Ahvaz, blocking the roads.

Confronting the angry people, the Iranian regime deployed its suppressive security forces in the streets. In the face of oppressive forces, the defiant youth torched lights and blocked the roads.

About the dubious death of Hassan Heidari, one of his relatives said: ” First, Hassan felt he was suffering from food poisoning, so we took him to the hospital, at midnight. Nurses tried to help him, however, he suffered a shock and died subsequently. We were told he died due to poisoning.”

“He was a full-bodied healthy man and he had no heart problems and illnesses what-so-ever. The Iranian Regime’s Ministry of Intelligence (MOIS) is responsible for his death.” The relative added.

Because of his poems, Hassan Heidari had been arrested by the notorious agents of the MOIS several times in Ahvaz. He was arrested in August for the last time and later released on bail.

According to the reports, the defiant youth of Ahvaz joined the protesters in Shadegan.

Al-Arabiya TV reported a night of protest in Ahvaz. Al-Arabiya added that following the news about the assassination of a poet, Hassan Heidari, hundreds took to the streets at night, blaming the authorities for the assassination. The social media activists posted images and videos showing hundreds of youth marching in Ahvaz’s streets chanting slogans against the authorities asking for the reason for the death of the young poet who had been arrested for his political poems and his activities in favor of his countrymen. The protesters blocked the main roads.

The young people in Ahvaz continued marching toward the main squares of the city chanting: “Ahvaz, rise up”.

People in Shadegan continued protesting until the early morning of November 11.

This is not the first time the Iranian regime assassinates dissidents. The Mullahs try to intimidate the society and silence dissidents; however, the events in Ahvaz and Shadegan once again proved that these assassinations just fuel the protests against this cruel regime.

This is the nature of mullahs’ regime, on the one hand, it kills its own people, and on the other hand, suppresses and kills the people of other states like Iraq and Lebanon by its proxy forces.

Committing a massacre in 1988 in which 30,000 of Mujahedin-e Khalq (PMOI/MEK) members and supporters were slaughtered, killing and imprisoning journalists and environmental activists, meddling, and fueling terrorism in neighboring countries are just a part of this regime’s record in the past four decades. In recent uprisings in Iraq and Lebanon people demand eviction of the Iranian regime of their countries.

A new era has started and a bright future is on the horizon for the Iranian people as well as the people of the region. The new chapter of history will be written by the Iranian people and the MEK’s resistance units and also the people of neighboring countries.

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

#NoDeathPenalty,Human Rights,Iran human rights,Iran Women rights,MEK

Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of the human rights situation in Iran on November 8, 2019- Geneva

U.N. Criticizes Iran’s Human Rights Abuses

Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of the human rights situation in Iran on November 8, 2019- Geneva

Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of the human rights situation in Iran on November 8, 2019- Geneva

On Tuesday, November 8, 2019, 111 countries participated in the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of the human rights situation in Iran. The UPR is a peer-review mechanism whereby the United Nations member states can make recommendations to governments that are under review.

The Working Group in Geneva on Tuesday had a lot to say about the regime’s treatment of women, the execution of minors, the use of torture, and overall human rights abuses, making a total of 329 recommendations to the Iranian regime.

The recommendations made by the Working Group of the UPR were adopted on November 12th at a meeting of the U.N. Human Rights Council. The MEK has reported previously that the U.N. has condemned the Iranian regime 65 times over the last four decades for its human rights abuses.

Recommendations Made

A number of countries called on Iran to ratify the

Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW).

Denmark, Estonia, and Moldova recommended that the regime ratify the Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.

Germany called on Iran to “[r]atify core international human rights conventions, in particular, the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.”

Germany also called on the regime to “establish a formal moratorium on the death penalty. In particular, cease all planned executions of juvenile offenders and prohibit the imposition of the death penalty for crimes committed by minors.”

Albania called on the Iranian regime to cooperate with all U.N. Special Rapporteurs who wish to visit the country.

Sweden agreed, saying that Iran must “fully cooperate with and grant immediate and unfettered access for the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran.”

Belgium recommended that Iran should “abolish the death penalty at least for crimes committed by persons under 18 years of age, in accordance with its obligations under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and commute all death sentences for juvenile offenders.”

The United States called on the Iranian regime to immediately end the use of torture and to credibly investigate and prosecute all allegations of torture.

Ukraine called on Iran to “remove all national law provisions that allow for punishments that amount to torture or cruel and degrading treatment.”

Australia said Iran must “[i]mmediately investigate all allegations involving the torture and other ill-treatment of those arrested or detained during the demonstrations in December 2017 and hold those responsible to account.”

Australia also called on the regime to “[g]uarantee the rights to freedom of expression, association, and assembly, and release political prisoners, including women’s rights activists, labor rights activists, environmentalists, scholars, lawyers and journalists, detained for exercising these rights.”

The United Kingdom called on Iran to “[i]mmediately demonstrate that all detainees in prison are neither tortured nor subject to cruel or inhumane treatment or punishment.”

Switzerland called on the Iranian regime to “[r]elease all persons detained for exercising their rights to freedom of expression, association, and peaceful assembly, and repeal or amend laws and other provisions criminalizing or restricting the exercise of those rights.”

Argentina said Iran must “[g]uarantee freedom of expression, particularly of men and women human rights defenders and journalists, and repeal legal provisions that affect these rights.”

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

1988 Massacre,Human Rights,Iran human rights,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,People's Mojahedin organization of Iran,PMOI,UN Human Rights Council

Iran Claims All Evidence for Its Human Rights Abuses Comes from MEK

The United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland

The Iranian regime’s representative at the review session of the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva claimed that his country is one of the largest democracies in Western Asia and doesn’t need a Special Rapporteur, even though Amnesty International and Western governments have repeatedly and strongly condemned the regime’s violation of human rights.

Javad Larijanithe Iranian regime’s representative to the Human Rights Council, claimed on Friday that UN Special Rapporteur Javaid Rehman had formed his opinion based solely on the information provided by Iran’s main opposition group, the Mujahedin-e Khalq (PMOI/MEK).

This bizarre claim about the MEK came just two days after Amnesty International urged the international community to “publicly condemn the deterioration in Iran’s human rights record” during the review session at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva.

Philip Luther, Research and Advocacy Director for the Middle East and North Africa at Amnesty International, said:

“From horrific execution rates, to the relentless persecution of human rights defenders, rampant discrimination against women and minorities, and ongoing crimes against humanity, the catalogue of appalling violations recorded in Iran reveals a sharp deterioration in its human rights record.”

Larijani’s ridiculous comments about the MEK did not stop Western countries from condemning Iran’s human rights violations in the session, with representatives from around the world criticizing the regime for executing over 120,000 MEK members for peaceful political activism; 30,000 of whom during the 1988 massacre.

United States representative Mark Cassayre said:

“For decades Iran has flagrantly violated its citizens’ human rights: We urge the government to allow the Special Rapporteur on Iran to visit the country and investigate existing practices.”

While Miriam Shearman, Britain’s deputy representative to the UN in Geneva, said:

“We remain deeply concerned by Iran’s failure to uphold international legal obligations, and its arbitrary detention of citizens and dual nationals arrested on unclear charges, denied due process and subject to mistreatment.”

And it should be noted that despite the Regime’s massive efforts to cover up the executions of the MEK, one member of the 1988 “Death Commissions” that sent the  MEK members to their deaths, defended the massacre in July. Amnesty responded to former Justice Minister Mostafa Pourmohammadi’s comments about the massacre of the MEK by saying that these

“provide shocking confirmation of the authorities’ wilful flouting of international human rights law both at the time and now and a stark reminder of the sense of impunity that senior officials linked to the killings enjoy”.

Amnesty was “particularly concerned” that he accused those advocating for truth and accountability regarding the massacre of the MEK of ‘terrorism’ and ‘collusion’ and threatening them with a prosecution. Amnesty said Iranian officials must not be allowed to protect themselves from accountability in the MEK massacre.

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

Arash Sadeghi,Golrokh Iraee,Human Rights,Iran human rights,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq

Former political prisoner Golrokh Iraee

Iran Human Rights Activist Has Home Raided Before Being Dragged off to Prison

Former political prisoner Golrokh Iraee

Former political prisoner Golrokh Ebrahimi Iraee is rearrested

Iranian human rights activist Golrokh Ebrahimi Iraee was arrested on Saturday at her home in Tehran, with at least ten security agents raiding her home before taking her into custody.

Iraee, a former political prisoner, must now serve a sentence handed down in July and upheld on appeal without further examination, according to her lawyer Amir Raissian, which relates to a protest that she took part in during her last detention where she criticized the Iranian regime for the execution of three Kurdish dissidents.

Iraee and fellow political prisoner Atena Daemi were found guilty on vague national security charges, the kind often levied against political prisoners. They were sentenced to three years and seven months in prison for “insulting the supreme leader” (two years and one month) and “propaganda against the state” (one year and six months) each by Judge Iman Afshari of Branch 26 of the Revolutionary Court in Tehran.

They will each have to serve at least two years and one month of that sentence.

Iraee was first arrested, alongside her husband and two other activists, by the intelligence division of the Iranian regime’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) on September 6, 2014. She was held for three weeks on Ward 2A in Evin Prison, which is known to be the IRGC Intelligence ward, before being released on September 27 on an 800 million rial bail for her activities on Facebook.

Iraee was later sentenced to six years in prison for “insulting sanctities” and “propaganda against the state”, which are again vague charges levied against political activists. Her crime? Writing an unpublished story about the barbaric punishment of stoning in Iran, which the regime would never have known about had they not stormed her house and seized her computer.

In October 2016, her house was stormed by security forces and she was taken to Evin Prison to serve her sentence. Her husband Arash Sadeghi, who began serving a 15-year prison sentence earlier that year for his peaceful political activities, went on a hunger strike in protest to her arrest and after 72 days she was released on January 3, 2017.

However, she was re-arrested on January 22 of that year when she went to the hospital where Sadeghi was supposed to be examined.

Iraee was released on bail in April 2019 after serving 3.5 years of her six-year prison sentence.

Since then, she has been campaigning on Twitter for the release of cancer-stricken Sadeghi and calling for him to be allowed access to medical treatment because he is in poor health following a cancer operation last year.

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

Human Rights,Iran Economy,Iran human rights,Iran Protests,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI),NCRI,PMOI,Retirees' Protests

Retirees gather out side the regime's parliament

Iran Regime Violently Attacks Retiree Protest

Retirees gather out side the regime's parliament

A large number of retirees staged gatherings outside the regime’s Majlis (Parliament)- November 10, 2019

A large group of retirees gathered outside the regime’s Budget and Planning Organization and the Parliament (Majlis) on Sunday in order to protest their appalling living conditions and the failure of their pensions to meet their basic needs. Retirees from many other provinces across the country traveled to join the protests.

The clerical regime tried to stop the protests from taking place and prevent other people from joining the gatherings by blocking the streets leading to the regime’s parliament in order to deny access to the retirees and their supporters. They also stationed hundreds of suppressive forces, over 50 agents riding motorcycles, and dozens of plainclothes agents on location in advance of the gathering to harass, intimidate, and arrest people for protesting.

Despite the mullahs’ suppressive measures, the crowd of retirees, which included many women held their gathering outside Parliament and chanted:

  • “Imprisoned teachers must be freed”
  • “We are furious over so much injustice”
  • “We will not rest until we get what is our right”
  • “Protest gathering is our inalienable right”

Outside the Planning and Budget Organization, dozens of protesters gathered to have the voices heard, but the suppressive forces of the regime cracked down violently and did not even allow the retirees to speak with one another.

Many protesters were arrested by the regime and had their phones confiscated, even though their only crime was holding a peaceful protest against the Iranian Regime. The mullahs were terrified that the people might release videos or pictures on social media that would expose the regime and go viral so that all the world could see the regime’s abuses.

The Secretariat of the National Council of Resistance of Iran wrote: “The Iranian Resistance hails the protesters and urges the residents of Tehran, especially the young people, to support the retirees. It also calls on the United Nations Human Rights Council and the High Commissioner for Human Rights as well as other human rights organizations to take urgent action to secure the release of those detained.”

The Iranian people have been rising up to protest the regime for corruption, humans rights abuses, warmongering, terrorism, and much more besides for nearly two years and the mullahs are terrified that the people will overthrow them because then the regime’s leaders will  be held accountable for their many crimes against the people of Iran, including the 1988 massacre of 30,000 political prisoners. Most of the victims were the members or sympathizers of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI, Mujahedin-e Khalq or MEK).

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

1988 Massacre,Human Rights,Iran human rights,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,People's Mojahedin organization of Iran,PMOI

Prof. Sheehan

Prof Sheehan: The Main Target of 1988 Clerical Edict Was MEK

Prof. Sheehan

Prof.Ivan Sascha Sheehan

The 40th anniversary of Iran’s hostage crisis reminds us of the terrorist nature of the ruling regime in Iran. In 1979 a number of thugs seized the American embassy in Tehran and took 55 embassy employees and diplomats hostage for 444 days. Hostage-taking and warmongering as well as exporting terrorism have always been the fundamental strategy and diplomacy of this regime.

In an article published in Town Hall, Prof. Ivan Sascha Sheehan,  director of the graduate programs in Negotiation and Conflict Management and Global Affairs and Human Security in the School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Baltimore, discussed the Iranian regime’s four-decade history of terrorism, saying: “For four decades, Western powers have regrettably but repeatedly failed to address the looming Iran threat or the belligerent regime’s underlying ideology,”

Dr. Sheehan then refers to the regime’s ongoing hostage-taking and writes: “At present, at least 17 dual nationals are held captive by Iranian authorities, often on the flimsiest of pretenses.”

Referring to the execution of 30,000 Mujahedin-e Khalq (PMOI/MEK) members and supporters in 1988, the article reads: “Mass arrests are a reminder of the Islamic Republic’s past crimes against humanity, particularly the massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in the summer of 1988. That incident stemmed from a fatwa by Ayatollah Khomeini which declared all opponents of the theocratic system to be at war with God himself, and thus subject to summary execution.”

The writer points to the regime’s animosity toward its main opposition, the MEK and writes: “The main target of that clerical edict was the highly capable resistance organization known as the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK) and this group made up the overwhelming majority of the massacre’s victims.”

Dr. Sheehan, then discusses the MEK’s leading role in an ongoing struggle for freedom and democracy in Iran, saying: “The movement endured in spite of the fierce persecution and even thrived in the ensuing decades. Last year, it was credited with leading the countrywide anti-regime protests and giving voice to the people’s progressive aspirations. But Khomeini’s fatwa remains in force, and political prisoners have been executed for actual or perceived support of the MEK.”

Pointing to the disastrous policy of appeasement toward the religious fascist regime ruling Iran, Dr. Sheehan writes: “These tactics were used, for instance, in 2016 around the time that the Iran nuclear deal was implemented. Four Americans were released in January of that year, but only in exchange for the U.S. settling an old debt to the previous Iranian government, as well as releasing or dropping charges against 21 Iranian nationals” he continued, “this only served to reinforce the impression that hostage-taking is a potentially lucrative endeavor. It is, therefore, no surprise that all four of the American hostages were promptly replaced by others.”

Finally, Prof. Sheehan concludes: “The only way this phenomenon’s recurrence can be prevented over the long term is if Tehran’s behavior – or the regime itself – changes completely,” “Domestic unrest demonstrates that there is no need for Western powers to actively pursue regime change. But they most definitely should promote an alternative vision for Iran’s future,”

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

1988 Massacre,Amnesty International,Amnesty International report,Amnesty International Report on 1988 massacre,Human Rights,Iran human rights,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,People's Mojahedin organization of Iran,PMOI

Amnesty International report on 1988 massacre in Iran

Iran: Amnesty International Calls for Condemnation of Iran’s Deterioration of Human Rights Record at the UN Human Rights Council

Amnesty International calls on publicly condemn the deterioration in Iran’s human rights record during the country’s upcoming review session at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva on 8 November”

On November 6, 2019, Amnesty International released a statement calling the international community to “publicly condemn the deterioration in Iran’s human rights record during the country’s upcoming review session at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva on 8 November”

The organization urges states taking part in Iran’s Universal Periodic Review (UPR) to denounce the widespread human rights violations and make concrete recommendations for the Iranian authorities to address them.

“From horrific execution rates to the relentless persecution of human rights defenders, rampant discrimination against women and minorities, and ongoing crimes against humanity, the catalog of appalling violations recorded in Iran reveals a sharp deterioration in its human rights record,” said Philip Luther, Research and Advocacy Director for the Middle East and North Africa at Amnesty International.

It is worth noting that on September 20, 2019, Human rights experts from various countries took part in a conference held at the United Nations European Headquarters in Geneva, calling to end the three-decade-long impunity Iranian regime officials have been enjoying in relation to continuing human rights violations across the country, and especially the 1988 massacre of political prisoners. Over 30,000 political prisoners, mainly members and supporters of the Iranian opposition Mujahedin-e Khalq (PMOI/MEK), were then executed in just a few months.

“Why should there now be a tribunal on the crime against humanity committed in 1988? First, because lawyers have examined evidence and know beyond doubt that a crime was committed. If Iran disputes that, we have a process for that,” Kristy Brimelow, QC, an international human rights lawyer, said in her remarks.

“In July 2019, Mostafa Pourmohammadi, mullahs’ former minister of justice, responded to allegations of 1988 executions and defended them as the execution of terrorists. But evidence shows the contrary. Many of the people had been arrested for distributing leaflets, many were children.”

“It is time that we write the history within the judicial setting as to what happened in 1988, and this crime against humanity must be recognized beyond political goals, but within its judicial context. Otherwise, what’s the point of the UN?” said Swiss MP Laurence Fellman Rielle

“We are witnessing progress in seeing the perpetrators of this crime being brought before a court. Since launching the campaign for justice for the 1988 massacre victims, many of the perpetrators have been exposed and the crime has been documented,”.

“Amnesty International has also rallied to expose this crime. It has underlined that if the perpetrators are not held to account before a tribunal, more crimes and massacres will take place. Amnesty called it a crime against humanity. Amnesty has also gathered testimonies from hundreds of witnesses,” she added.

Henrik Hermansson, a political scientist and human rights researcher, reminded the conference of a number of reports covering the 1988 massacre.

“We have the locations of 60 mass graves… The 1988 massacre shaped Iran’s political system. The massacre was carried out by many authorities. Many death commission members now hold important positions in the government,” he explained.

“Iran’s large financial institutions are controlled by the perpetrators. Iran’s current supreme leader, who was the regime’s president in 1988, was directly involved. The 1988 massacre became a career-making moment for many Iranian officials.

“When officials are trained on the mass murder of dissidents, mass murder is how they will respond to protests. The continued impunity of this crime contributes to this continued crime.

“We should understand impunity is a cause of human rights violation and a violation of itself. There’s still a role for the UN and international human rights community to end impunity, even if it has political ramifications.

“I call on member states to discuss the 1988 massacre with the Special Rapporteur to make sure it’s not dropped again. Failure to investigate is also a crime,” he concluded.

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

1988 Massacre,Human Rights,Iran human rights,Iran Opposition,Iran Protests,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,PMOI

Dr. Ivan Sascha Sheehan

Iran Regime’s Deadly Pattern of Hostage Taking and Terrorism

Dr. Ivan Sascha Sheehan

Dr. Ivan Sascha Sheehan is the director of the graduate programs in Negotiation and Conflict Management and Global Affairs and Human Security in the School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Baltimore.

Monday was the 40th anniversary of the Iran hostage crisis and marked four decades of hostage-taking and terrorism by the Iranian regime and its proxies. But over the course of that time, the West has failed to address the looming threat from the regime and its ideology.

Right now, there are at least 17 dual nationals being held captive in Iran of flimsy pretences, with most of them charged with “national security” crimes, despite a severe lack of evidence. At least four American citizens are serving 10-year sentences, but the regime has hinted that they could be released if the US pays a ransom. Why would any country release people who are real threats to their national security?

Dr Ivan Sascha Sheehan, an expert in global terrorism, counterterrorism, U.S. foreign policy, and international conflict management, wrote: “It is safe to assume that this pattern will repeat for as long as the US and its allies take a short-term approach to address Iranian hostage-taking. The only way this phenomenon’s recurrence can be prevented over the long term is if Tehran’s behaviour – or the regime itself – changes completely. Last year’s public protests underscore the fact that this outcome is within reach. But for the Iranian people to grasp it, they must recognize support from foreign governments that are interested in more substantial goals than the begrudging release of Iran’s hostages du jour.”

But the regime is not just a major threat to other countries’ citizens. In fact, the suffering of the rest of the world is very small compared with the horrors endured by the Iranian people. The number of Iranian political prisoner grew by thousands during the regime’s suppression of pro-democracy protests in early 2018, with many of them facing or serving lengthy prison sentences.

And prison is one of the better sentences for Iranian dissidents, with executions being the regime’s favourite method to punish those who question them. Some 120,000 political prisoners have been executed in the past 40 years, 30,000 of them in the summer of 1988 alone. Most of them were members of the Mujahedin-e Khalq (PMOI/MEK), but in spite of their persecution, the group has thrived and gained support from all over Iran. Even the regime has been forced to admit that the MEK has been influential in the ongoing anti-regime uprisings.

The West must support the Iranian people in their quest for freedom.

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

Human Rights,Iran human rights,Iran Terrorism,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,People's Mojahedin organization of Iran,PMOI

UN_General_Assembly

Iran Regime shunned at UN

UN_General_Assembly

UN_General_Assembly

Normally, the UN General Assembly’s annual session is made a mockery of by the Iranian Regime’s mere presence, with President Hassan Rouhani spreading lies about what is happening. However, this year, the Regime was isolated and no one listened to them.

The mullahs’ regime was targeted for its violations of international laws in UN special committees, in particular, the Third Committee, which examines human rights violations, and the First Committee, which examines violations of international disarmament and global security standards.

In fact, the theocratic regime faced an unprecedented reaction from the international community for its hostile and belligerent behavior; something that hasn’t happened since the Iran-Iraq war.

This is the direct result of the Regime announcing that it would stop complying with the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), which is the international nuclear deal that gives Iran sanctions relief in exchange for stopping work on its nuclear program. So far, the regime has already completed three steps that violate the deal and plan to complete a fourth.

There is now an international consensus against the regime in the UN General Assembly, which meant that Rouhani’s hypocritical plan for a “world devoid of violence” was not recognized in the General Assembly. Indeed,  the regime’s UN trip was such a failure that even state-run media outlets couldn’t find any praise.

The Third Committee has condemned the mullahs’ regime’s human rights violations over the past 38 years and this year was even worse for the mullahs, with representatives from different countries speaking up about the gross violations, including Dr. Javaid Rehman, the UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Iran.

In his report, Rehman said: “In 2018, there were seven reported cases of executions of child offenders. There are currently an estimated 90 individuals on death row who were all under the age of 18 at the time of their alleged offenses. Among the most recent cases, on 25 April 2019, two 17-year-old children, Mehdi Sohrabifar and Amin Sedaghat, were executed.”

The UN has condemned the Iranian regime for human rights abuses at least 65 times over the past four decades; a constant reminder that the regime lacks credibility domestically and abroad.

The Iranian Resistance has consistently exposed the mullahs’ human rights violations for 40 years, but it has cost them greatly. The People’s Mujahedin-e Khalq (PMOI/MEK) has lost 120,000 MEK members and supporters to the executioners in Iran, merely for defending human rights and freedoms.

Please follow and like us:
error

Continue Reading

Copyright © 2018 MEK-Iran.com. All Rights Reserved
Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial