Posts Tagged ‘Women’s Rights in Iran’

Ashraf 3,Gender equality,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,MEK Abania,Mujahedin-e Khalq,National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI),NCRI,PMOI,Women's Rights in Iran

MEK guard of honor-Ashraf 3- Albania

Women lead the Iranian Resistance

MEK guard of honor-Ashraf 3- Albania

Guard of honor at MEK headquarter in Albania-July 2019

The Iranian Regime has denied basic human rights to the Iranian people, especially women, for 40 years now, but the pro-democracy movement has remained strong and active, despite vicious reactions by the Regime.

On occasion, this resistance has been visible to the world, such as for the 2009 protests against the rigged election and the nationwide uprising in January 2018. In every uprising, protest, and pro-democracy movement, women have been at the forefront and, according to women’s rights advocate Dr. Maria Ryan, that is no accident.

She wrote for The Hill on Thursday, September 12, 2019, that the mullahs have targeted Iranian women with “repressive, misogynistic laws and execution”, explaining that a female soccer fan died from self-immolation last week because she expected to be jailed for attending a football match.

Ryan spoke at the annual conference of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) in July, at Ashraf 3, the new home of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI, Mujahedin-e Khalq or MEK), during a panel entitled “Women in the Iranian Resistance: Defying the Misogynist Regime, Paying the Price of Freedom”.

Ryan wrote of that event: “I met many brave women who survived the mullahs’ brutal crackdown. Many said they had suffered in torture chambers for long years. They shared their stories with me, their personal suffering and the loss of loved ones.”

She continued: “They explained that, while living in Iran, they were not able to choose their own clothes or their professions; a girl as young as nine years old could be married, they said, and a man could have multiple wives. They were forced to leave Iran and were promised safety in camps inside Iraq, they recounted to me, only to be targeted by bombs and gunfire. Several of them said they lost many of their friends to these attacks.”

Ryan said that daily life had become so difficult for many Iranians that growing numbers are turning to drugs to dull the pain or selling their organs to make ends meet. She said that, despite this, the women she met “inspired” her with their “determination, loyalty, patriotism and faith”.

She explained that the NCRI and its members want basic freedoms and are preparing to serve as an interim government if the Iranian people overthrow the mullahs.

Ryan said: “Whether or not you believe that regime change in Iran is truly just around the corner, I am absolutely convinced that with such women in the ranks of the resistance, the change will come to Iran.”

 Staff writer

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Human Rights,Iran human rights,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,NCRI,PMOI,Women's Rights in Iran

Arresting women in Iran for "malveiling"

Defiant Woman Arrested for “Improper” Hijab and then Beaten in Prison

Arresting women in Iran for "malveiling"

Archive photo- The Iranian regime security forces (IRGC) arresting a young woman for “improper” veiling

On Tuesday, February 26th, a young woman was brutally beaten in an Iranian prison and tied to the rails in the hallway of the prison for several hours as reported by Irannewswire.org and a number of other outlets.

Arrested for Not Observing Hijab

The 25-year-old woman, known only as “Zahra,” was stopped and arrested on a street in central Khoy in West Azerbaijan Province on Sunday, February 24th for a violation of the mandatory hijab.  She was then taken in front of a judge, who transferred her to prison for “arguing” with him. It is not clear what the argument entailed.

Beaten in Prison

On Tuesday, February 26th, Zahra was helping another woman at the prison with her child at around 10 PM. A prison guard verbally abused her for “not observing the lights out” and claimed that she was being too loud.

Zahra argued with the guard, and then more guards arrived and brutally beat the young woman, despite the lack of physical threat posed by her. According to reports, the beating ripped Zahra’s clothes and dislodged her prosthetic leg.

Tied to Hallway Rail

After the violent beating, guards dragged Zahra to the prison hallway and tied her to the rails there. She was left in the hallway for five hours until other prisoners begged guards to release her and allow her to return to her cell to sleep.

Morality Police

Iranian women are often subjected to violence at the hands of the regime and its agents. Women found in violation of the mandatory hijab may be arrested or beaten in the street by the so called morality police. Last year a young woman was beaten in the street and dragged on the ground by morality police after she was accused of improper veiling.

A bystander took a video of the incident, which shows the woman’s hair barely visible underneath her scarf. After the severe beating, her friend shouts that she has a heart condition and threatens to file a complaint against the female morality officer who carried out the attack. The officer responds, “You can’t do anything.”

An official of the theocratic regime claimed in January that allowing Iranian women to choose their clothing would lead to the end of the regime.

Jafar Dolatabadi, Tehran’s Chief Prosecutor said, “The enemy is trying to turn chastity and the hijab into a choice.”
He continued, “Therefore they have instigated some people to take off their hijab, trying to make their plans operational, but they were met with the decisive approach of the judiciary and the police.”

The regime has refused to take action to make Iran a safe place for women. The regime parliament refuses to raise the marriage age or pass a law criminalizing domestic violence, claiming that both laws would destroy families.

The MEK and the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) believe that the women of Iran deserve better. Mrs. Maryam Rajavi, President-elect of the NCRI, has a ten-point plan for the democratic future of Iran that includes gender equality and separation of religion and state. The women of Iran have been denied their voices for forty years. The time has come for women to take back their freedom. The MEK is proud to be part of that effort.

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Arresting Women for not obeying the regime dress code

Second-Class Citizens: The Fight for Gender Equality in Iran

Arresting Women for not obeying the regime dress code

The repressive Iranian regime security forces arrest women for what they call mal-veiling

February marks the 40th anniversary of the Islamic Revolution, and the Iranian regime is using the occasion to celebrate the fact that it has managed to hold onto power: a lukewarm achievement at best.

Iranian women felt the sting of oppression under the mullahs’ rule immediately and have suffered daily for the last forty years. It is hard to understate how drastically life changed for women in Iran after 1979 and how deeply this has altered Iranian society.

Second-class Citizens

The regime’s misogynistic views toward women are documented well before the 1979 Revolution. In 1962, Ruhollah Khomeini previous regime Supreme Leader wrote a letter to the Shah of Iran, conferring his extremist views under the banner of Islam, saying that the “interests of the state are better served by preserving the religious teachings of Islam and calmness of the heart.” He advised that women should no longer be allowed to vote.

After the Shah’s monarchical dictatorship was overthrown in the 1979 Revolution, Khomeini seized control of the country and established the clerical regime that is still in place in Iran. Shortly after the Revolution, Khomeini abolished the Family Protection Law, which gave women family rights. Soon afterward, female judges were banned from working in the judiciary, and social services for women were canceled.

 

Almost overnight the women of Iran were relegated to the status of second-class citizens, and over the past forty years, their treatment has worsened under the mullahs’ rule. Under regime law, Iranian women must comply with mandatory hijab, a dress code that includes strict standards for modest dress and veiling. The regime has cracked down on its enforcement of hijab over the years, and women who are found to be out of compliance may be beaten in the street.

 

In 2014, a number of Iranian women were the victims of acid attacks and stabbings. According to the National Council of Resistance of Iran’s (NCRI) Women’s Committee, these attacks were carried out by gangs backed by the Iranian regime.

An estimated 87 women have been executed since current regime President Hassan Rouhani took office in 2013. In the summer of 1988, tens of thousands of women were executed during the 1988 Massacre of  political prisoners, mainly MEK members. These women, who included elderly women, pregnant women, and teenagers, were executed for exercising their freedom of expression.

Advocating for Women’s Rights in Iran

 

The NCRI’s Women’s Committee partners with women’s rights organizations across the world to draw attention to the plight of Iranian women and to advocate for equal rights in Iran.

 

The NCRI, the democratic alternative to the ruling regime, offers hope to the people of Iran who want to live outside of the shackles of the oppressive theocracy. The NCRI and its leader, Mrs. Maryam Rajavi, will not allow women to be treated as second-class citizens in a free Iran. This commitment is spelled out in Mrs. Rajavi’s ten-point plan for the future of Iran, which guarantees gender equality and equal representation in government.

Women in Iran, says Mrs. Rajavi, are “paying the price for freedom and turn the page of history in their homeland.” The women who are protesting on the streets of Iran today are ensuring that their daughters and granddaughters can live as equals alongside their sons and grandsons.

 

The NCRI’s Women’s Committee supports the people of Iran in their protests against forced marriages of girls and violence against women. This is not a fight for just the women of Iran. Men are part of the protests for equality, and international activists have taken up the cause of equality for Iranian women.

 

Khomeini said that equality between women and men is “in fundamental violation of some of the most crucial rulings of Islam and in defiance of some of the explicit commandments of the Quran.” The MEK believes that this is a false and misogynistic representation of Islam.

 

Despite forty years of oppression, the women of Iran refuse to be silenced. Society benefits when strong women are free to raise their voices. The women of Iran will no longer wait for permission to do so.

Staff Writer

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Child marriage in Iran,Human Rights,Iran human rights,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,PMOI,Women's Rights in Iran

Child marriage in Iran

Iranian Regime MP Defends Parliament’s Failure to Pass Child Marriage Bill

Child marriage in Iran

Photo Credit to IranNewsWire: The Iranian regime promotes child marriage rather than protecting young girls from forced and early marriages.

The Iranian regime parliament’s Legal Commission defended the rejection of a bill which would have completely banned child marriage in Iran. The “Child Spouse Bill,” which was introduced into the regime parliament in 2016, would have completely banned marriage for girls under the age of 13 and boys under the age of 16.

Hassan Nourozi, the spokesperson for the parliament’s Legal Commission, justified the bill’s failure in comments that were broadcast on state-run media.

“For a girl who is alone and has no one, marriage is definitely a game changer,” he said.

The Child Spouse Bill

The Child Spouse Bill would prohibit marriage for girls under the age of 13 and boys under the age of 16. Girls between the ages of 13-16 and boys between the ages of 16-18 would need parental consent and permission from the court to marry. Girls over the age of 16 and boys over the age of 18 could marry without permission.

Child Marriage Statistics

Official sources cite at least 37,000 registered marriages of girls between the ages of 10-14 in Iran in 2017. There are 24,000 divorcées under the age of 18 in Iran. 15,000 of those women are under the age of 15.

A 2017 Iranian media report said that 17% of girls in Iran married when they were under 18 years of age.

Contradictions in Current Law

In his defense of Parliament’s rejection of the bill, Nourozi said, “In our opinion, there are some problems in the proposed bill because many of the criteria are not acceptable. According to the representatives in the Legal Commission, a 15-year-old girl is not considered a child … and is fit to marry.”

Nourozi noted that Sharia law, Qom jurisprudence, and Iranian and Lebanese experts all say that girls enter puberty at the age of nine. He compared the experience of his grandmother with Iranian girls in 2018, saying, “My own grandmother was married at 9 years of age and did not have any problems.”

 

He added, “Our point is that if a girl who does not have a father and has problems can marry a 17-year-old young (man), and there is no problem with that.”

 

Statistics contradict Nourozi’s contention that girls marry 17-year-old boys. Most underage girls are forced to marry much older men. In 2013, over 41,000 girls under the legal age were registered for marriage, but only 300 underage boys were registered.

 

Shahnaz Sajad, an official at the Vice Presidency for Women and Family Affairs, said in an interview with the state-run ILNA news agency that child marriage results from poverty, cultural deprivation, and addiction.

“What percent of 13-year-old girls or under 13 year-olds in our society think about marriage with a 14 or 16-year-old boy?” Sajad asked. “These cases are very rare.”

She added, “When the father of a 12-year-old girl forces her to marry because she does not want to marry, the legitimacy of such a marriage is legally and religiously problematic.”

The MEK is opposed to the regime’s oppression of women, including child marriage. The MEK and the Iranian Opposition offer a democratic alternative to the religious dictatorship, in which men and women can have equal representation in government. Mrs. Maryam Rajavi, President-elect of the Iranian Opposition, has a ten-point plan to restore democratic rule to Iran after the fall of the mullahs’ regime and to ensure that child marriage is a thing of the past.

Staff Writer

 

 

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Compulsory Hijab,IRGC,Maryam Rajavi,Morality Police,Women's Rights in Iran

Women’s Rights Activists Urged to Condemn Savage Beating of Ailing Young Woman for Improper Veiling

Women’s Rights Activists Urged to Condemn Savage Beating of Ailing Young Woman for Improper Veiling

Women’s Rights Activists Urged to Condemn Savage Beating of Ailing Young Woman for Improper Veiling

Women’s Rights Activists Urged to Condemn Savage Beating of Ailing Young Woman for Improper Veiling

On Thursday, the Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) condemned the savage beating of a young woman who was accused of “improper veiling”. The MEK (PMOI) joins them in their condemnation of this human rights abuse by Rouhani’s regime repressive “Morality Police” (Gasht-e Ershad).

 

The NCRI and MEK (PMOI) urge all organizations supporting women’s rights and human rights to stand with them in strong condemnation of this brutal attack by the regime’s suppressive forces.

 

The beating took place in Tehran on Wednesday, April 18th. The Morality Police attacked the young woman, claiming that she was improperly veiled, and beat her into unconsciousness. The brutal attack occurred despite the protestations of the woman’s friends, who said that she had a heart condition.

 

Mrs. Maryam Rajavi, President-elect of the National Council of Resistance of Iran, responded to the savage attack, saying that the brutal beating once again illustrated the ugly, inhuman and anti-Islamic face of the misogynous ruling regime in Iran.

She also called upon the Iranian youth “to confront such disrespect and violation of Iranian women’s dignity and not to allow their sisters to be attacked by Revolutionary Guards (IRGC) and their mercenaries”

The violent enforcement of the strict women’s dress code, or hijab, in Iran is a means of controlling women and restricting the actions of Iranian society as a whole. Iranian women have fought against this oppression for 40 years and continue to do so, despite the brutality of the suppressive forces of the mullahs’ regime.

 

Mrs. Rajavi called upon the youth of Iran to counter this violence and repression against women by the Revolutionary Guard and its mercenaries and to stand up for their sisters and not allow them to be insulted, abused, and suppressed.

Staff Writer

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