Posts Tagged ‘Mujahedin-e Khalq’

Iran Protests,MEK,MEK Network,Mujahedin-e Khalq,PMOI,railway workers,Taxi drivers

Protest by workers, taxi drivers, students, etc.

Iranians Protest Unpaid Wages, Regime Suppression, and Unfair Rules in Daily Acts of Rebellion

Protest by workers, taxi drivers, students, etc.

Photo Credit to Mojahedin.org-Protest by various sectors of the society in Iran continues.

Anti-regime protests in Iran continue on a daily basis in response to the country’s failing economy, government corruption, and human rights abuses. These protests have continued for over a year, despite the regime’s repeated attempts to suppress them.

The following is an abbreviated list of some of the protests that have taken place in Iran and reported by MEK sources, over the past week :

Railway Workers

On Tuesday, railway workers in Tabriz launched a strike in protest of unpaid wages. Regime officials attempted to intimidate the workers, but despite their threats, the striking employees of the Islamic Republic Railroad Company blocked the railroad tracks and prevented the train from entering the station.

 

Unpaid wages for railway workers in Iran have been an ongoing issue, leading to several protests over the past year. The Tabriz railway workers went on strike for several days in January to protest unpaid wages but ended their strike after the regime promised to pay their wages in full. Unfortunately, authorities have not made good on these promises, and the railway workers were forced to strike again.

Meanwhile, in Shahrud, railway workers continued their strike for the fourth consecutive day on Tuesday. The Shahrud railway workers launched their strike on Sunday in response to unpaid wages.

Railroad workers in Hormozgan and Kerman have launched similar strikes over the past week. The workers are all demanding that their overdue wages be paid.

Regime authorities have refused to take responsibility for the problem, claiming that other organizations and authorities bear the responsibility for paying the railway workers. The Islamic Republic Railroad Company claims that its subcontractors are responsible for paying the workers’ wages.

 

While the regime passes blame, the workers who maintain Iran’s railroads are left without the means to feed their families or meet their basic needs. The MEK has reported on numerous strikes over the past year by workers who were forced to protest because their wages were withheld for months. The regime refuses to acknowledge its patterns of denying its people pay for their work.

University Students

On Tuesday, students at Tehran University protested against the university’s imposition of arbitrary rules in its housing system. Earlier this week, school regulators canceled the housing of several students at the university. The students were living in the married students’ dormitory. Students were angered by the action and scheduled a number of protests in response.

Taxi Drivers

On Tuesday, taxi drivers in Dorud rallied in front of the governor’s office to protest the arrest of their colleagues. They chanted, “Imprisoned drivers must be freed!”

The taxi drivers were arrested after another demonstration on Saturday in protest of poor working conditions. The regime responded to that protest by raiding the homes of the protesters after the demonstration and arresting four of them.

 

The drivers refused to be intimidated by the regime’s acts of suppression and gathered again on Tuesday to demand the release of their colleagues and to continue their protests for better working conditions.

The MEK’s Resistance Units work with protesters on the ground and through social media to organize and spread the word of strikes and demonstrations. Dissent can no longer be suppressed, and the people’s voices are being heard. The cries for regime change grow louder each day.

 

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Iran Diplomat Terrorist,Iran Terrorism,Javad Zarif,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI),PMOI

MEK demonstration outside MSC2019 conference in Munich

Javad Zarif Resigns in Wake of Widespread Foreign Policy Failure

MEK demonstration outside MSC2019 conference in Munich

MEK protesters rally in front of the Munich Security Conference, condemning Javad Zarif’s presence at the conference and asking for his accountability for 40 years of terror and executions in Iran and in the region-February 17, 2019

On Monday night Iranian regime Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif announced his resignation in an Instagram post, which read, in part: “I apologize for my inability to continue serving and all the shortcomings during my tenure.”

Zarif’s resignation made headlines around the world within hours of his Instagram post, and regime state-run media outlets rushed to confirm the story.

The Fars news agency confirmed Zarif’s resignation in an interview with their foreign affairs reporter, who said that “an informed source close to the Foreign Minister confirmed this report.”

Zarif’s departure is the latest in a series of international crises facing the regime. The re-imposition of sanctions following the U.S. withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal has further weakened the already struggling Iranian economy, the regime recently failed to meet the terms necessary to retain its membership in the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), and the European Union has taken a series of measures to sanction Ministry of Intelligence and Security (MOIS) agents and expel regime diplomats over the past year because of their involvement in terrorist activities.

Munich Security Conference

Zarif has recently come under pressure for his role in the regime’s terrorist plots and meddling in the Middle East. Earlier this month, world leaders from sixty countries gathered in Warsaw to discuss Iran’s role in fostering instability in the Middle East. Days later Zarif lost his temper when asked a series of tough questions while attending the Munich Security Conference in Germany.

 

Zarif, who was clearly rattled by the presence of hundreds of MEK protesters calling for his ejection from the conference, was unable to coherently answer questions about the regime’s terrorist plots on European soil in 2018. Instead, he chose to vilify the MEK: the intended victims of the regime’s plots.

“The United States is listening to the wrong folks… what is clear is that there are people in Europe who have been on Europe’s terrorism list up until 2012,” Zarif said. “What happened all of a sudden that they were withdrawn from the terrorism list?… In 1998, the U.S. put the MEK on the terrorism list and in 2012 they took them off the terrorism list.”

 

Zarif continued his off-topic rant with angry words directed at high-ranking U.S. officials. “[U.S. President Donald Trump’s lawyer] Rudy Giuliani spoke yesterday for the MEK. [U.S. National Security Advisor] John Bolton has spoken for the MEK. John Bolton is angry because he promised the MEK that he would celebrate in 2019 in Iran with them. They are still in Paris,” he added.

MEK Protests

Zarif’s unhinged behavior at the Munich Conference was most likely a contributing factor to his sudden resignation, but his tantrum in Germany was reflective of the regime’s frustration with international relations. When Zarif arrived at the Munich Security Conference, he was greeted by hundreds of MEK supporters holding signs and banners calling him a terrorist and demanding that he be expelled from the conference. They chanted, “Terrorist Zarif, out of Munich!” and “Kick Javad Zarif out!”

MEK Supporters Protest for Zarif’s Expulsion from Munich Security Conference

As a member of the regime’s Supreme National Security Council, Zarif plays a key role in all decisions regarding terrorist attacks and assassinations. The MEK protesters in Munich urged the international community to expel Zarif because of his terrorist actions and to recognize the right of the Iranian people to rise up and overthrow their oppressors.

 

The MEK previously held protests this month in Paris and at the Warsaw Conference. All three protests were attended by hundreds of members of the Iranian diaspora and included well-respected speakers who called for the international community to recognize the right of the Iranian people to overthrow the mullahs’ regime and establish a free Iran.

 

This series of large and well-organized protests across Europe in such a short period of time has left the regime angry and afraid. The mullahs already see the MEK as an existential threat, so the presence of an organized resistance that can follow international conferences around the world has become a thorn in the side of regime leaders. The Munich protesters appear to have caused Zarif to have a total meltdown. The Iranian Resistance grows stronger by the day; the regime grows weaker. Freedom is close at hand.

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Human Rights,Iran human rights,Iran Opposition,Iran Womens Rights,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,Struan Stevenson

Struan Stevenson holds his book "Self Sacrifice"

Struan Stevenson:Good news, The Opposition is Headed By a Charismatic Female Leader Maryam Rajavi

Struan Stevenson holds his book "Self Sacrifice"

Struan Stevenson, Former MEP and the Coordinator of Campaign for Iran Change, holds his book on his experience with MEK.

On Tuesday, February 26, 2019, Struan Stevenson, a former member of the European Parliament (MEP) and frequent Iran commentator wrote his latest piece for UPI. His op-ed called on women in the West to lend their support to Iranian women in their fight to break free from the repressive policies of the Iranian regime.

Stevenson calls Iranian women, “among the most repressed in the world, ruled by a regime dominated by elderly, bearded misogynists.”

For this reason, Iranian women have played a central role in the Iranian opposition movement. They have been central figures in the protest movement that has swept across all 31 of Iran’s provinces. “Female teachers, medical staff, students, factory workers, and pensioners have taken to the streets to demand an end to corruption, and an end to discrimination and repression and an end to the clerical regime’s aggressive military adventurism across the Missile East,” Stevenson writes.

Leading Figures in the Calls for Regime Change

The largest voices in the calls for Iranian regime change come from the most influential and popular opposition group, the People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK). Within the MEK, many of the senior leadership is made up of women. Its leader, the president-elect Maryam Rajavi, is also female and is held in high esteem by political figures from around the world.

Women, in particular, have been mobilized by the regime’s repressive policies and discriminatory practices towards women. Stevenson describes some of these laws, “in Iran, women are considered the property of their closest male relative and have no legal rights. Girls of 9 can be married off by their parents.”

In the Iranian legal system, evidence provided by a woman is worth half that provided by a man. As a result, women cannot charge a man with rape unless they have four credible witnesses, a near impossibly high standard.

A Violent and Aggressive Brand of Fundamentalism

Prior to the 1979 revolution that brought the mullahs and their regime to power, Khomeini criticized the Shah’s permissive attitude towards women voting. He cited an extremist interpretation of Islamic teaching and called gender equality a “defiance of some of the explicit commandments of the Qoran.”

Following the revolution, as expected, Khomeini retracted many women’s rights. The regime prevents females riding bicycles, forces them to wear the hijab, and scrutinized the way they dress.

Under the clerical regime, gender violence has drastically increased. Stevenson says, “girls who were deemed to be improperly dressed in the street have suffered horrific acid attacks and stabbings, in assaults openly condoned by the mullahs.” Even something as innocuous as dancing or singing on social media can be enough to get a girl flogged or fined.

Women Around the World Should Stand with Iran’s Women

In a public statement, the former first lady of Algeria, Anissa Boumediene pledged her support to Maryam Rajavi and the MEK. The statement read, “yes, we stand with you Maryam, as we stand with all our Iranian sisters in your fierce fight seeking to free Iranian women from what enchains and imprisons them.”

Stevenson concludes, “her words should resonate in the West, where female politicians and activists must show solidarity with their oppressed and brutalized Iranian sisters.” They can do this by pledging support to Maryam Rajavi and the MEK, who are fighting tirelessly for freedom, gender equality, and democratic secularism for Iran to give the nation’s daughters a brighter future.

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1988 Massacre,HRC40,Human Rights,Iran human rights,Javad Zarif,MEK,MEK Support,Mujahedin-e Khalq,National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI),PMOI,UN Human Rights Council

MEK's supporters protest outside HRC40 in Geneva

Zarif Resigns as Protesters Protest His Planned Speech in Geneva

MEK's supporters protest outside HRC40 in Geneva

MEK supporters rally opposite UN Geneva amid the Fortieth Session of the Human Rights Council, to protest Javad Zarif’s planned speech at the council. Protesters called for regime’s accountability for the 1988 massacre of 30,000 political prisoners and for the ongoing violations of human rights in Iran, urging the UN to expel regime’s representatives from the Council.

Members of the Iranian diaspora across Europe and their international allies gathered in Geneva to protest the arrival of the regime’s foreign minister Javad Zarif at the UN. As the UN’s fortieth Human Rights Council convened, the Iranian resistance used Zarif’s arrival as an opportunity to draw attention to the glaring human rights violations perpetuated by the Iranian regime.

A Violent and Bloody Regime

Under current President Hassan Rouhani, the Iranian regime has carried out at least 3,590 executions, including 30 executions on those that were juveniles when the crime was allegedly committed. This figure makes Iran the country with the highest rate of executions per capita in the world.

As members of the Iranian resistance protested the regime’s atrocities in Geneva, they carried images of those executed by the mullahs over the forty years of their tyrannical rule. They also carried banners condemning the regime’s 1988 massacre of the People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK).

Over the space of a single summer in 1988, the clerical regime executed around 30,000 members of the political opposition group, the MEK. In Geneva, a small exhibit dedicated to the 30,000 victims of the massacre was erected. The protestors echoed Amnesty International’s recent calls for the UN to open an investigation into the massacre and hold those accountable to justice.

Ending the Mullahs Export of Terror

The protestors also expressed their anger and dismay at the regime’s state-sponsored terror activities that played out across Europe and the West in 2018. The regime was involved in the planning of terror attacks in France, Albania, and the US.

The protestors in Geneva called on the European governments to expel Iranian diplomats and prevent the regime using diplomatic buildings and figures as cover for underground terror activities. The protestors held banners with messages stating that there is no place in the UN for executioners and terrorist-agents.

Infighting in Within the Regime Leadership

As protestors gathered, Javad Zarif issued his resignation in a surprise twist of events. His resignations underscored protestors messages that the Iranian regime is in turmoil. Infighting has caused deep rifts in the leadership, which most likely prompted Zarif’s sudden resignation.

Explaining the decision, the National Council of Resistance of Iran’s (NCRI’s) Mohammad Mohaddessin tweeted, “Zarif’s resignation for whatever reason and regardless of the outcome, indicates [an] escalation of the crisis and internal power struggle in the regime, also its international failures.”

Mohaddessin said, “in the past 5.5 years, Zarif tried to create a façade of a “moderate image” for Iran’s religious fascism and pave the way for trade with the regime,” he added, “Zarif’s time has come to an end. Whether his resignation is finalized or overturned… [the] world will no longer be duped by Rouhani & Zarif.”

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MEK's Social Media

Regime Expresses Growing Concern over MEK’s Use of Social Media

MEK's Social Media

MEK’s social media activities and their popularity has broken the walls of censorship in Iran causing fear for the regime officials.

Officials within the Iranian regime are showing their increasing discomfort over the influence of social media in Iran. In recent months a number of high-ranking officials within the regime, including regime Presidentو Hassan Rouhani have expressed their fear that social media could be used by the MEK and Iranian Resistance to rise up against the mullahs.

The most recent official to comment on social media’s role in the growing protest movement in Iran is regime Prosecutor General Mohammad Jafar Montazeri. In an interview with the Fars News Agency, which is linked to the Revolutionary Guards (IRGC), he said, “Why should we be witnessing so much crime and sin in our society? The numbers are terrifying and this should be a warning to our officials. My messages are to those who can cleanse [social media], even if its 50 percent lesser. In the past ten months alone, cyberspace crimes and computer-based crimes have increased by 140 percent.”

Montazeri’s comments follow a series of similar remarks by regime officials. Their words invoke scare tactics that vilify the free exchange of information and set the stage for further crackdowns on social media usage and more extreme censorship of the Internet.

“Our authorities should know what a disgraceful atmosphere has been created in our society,” Montazeri went on to say.”Pay a visit to the Anti-Computer Crime Department. Who is responsible for all this?”

Countering Propaganda

Javad Javeed-Nia, the regime’s Deputy Prosecutor General in Cyberspace Affairs also spoke about the role of the Internet in changing people’s minds about issues. This is a deep concern for the regime, which relies heavily on propaganda.

Javeed-Nia said, “90 percent of the country’s cyberspace is controlled by foreigners and their main objective is to change the society’s tendencies and tastes. Everyone should react strongly through a planned process to the measures of our enemies and the [People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK)].

“Considering the fact that our enemies have established cyber armies against the [mullahs’ regime], those who care about our state must launch a media campaign against the enemy, identify the enemy’s strengths and weaknesses, and place forward an adequate analysis,” Javeed-Nia continued. “In a study conducted last year, the aggressive content published in Instagram on a daily basis was very extensive.”

The MEK’s Use of Telegram

The state-run Tehran Press news agency acknowledged that the MEK’s use of social media platforms, particularly Telegram, has left the regime unable to suppress the Resistance. “Considering the specific type of our culture, we have not been able to surpass the enemy in regards to cyberspace,” it said. “In fact, we have been very behind and continuously suffered heavy attacks. I can dare to say that the enemy, especially the [PMOI/MEK] organization, is in control of the Telegram platform. For those who should be familiar with this organization’s tactics, these remarks are not exaggerations at all and are in fact a reflection of our status quo.”

The state-run news agency continued:

“If not 100 percent, the mentality of toppling [the regime], seen very active today in social media platforms, is very much influenced by the literature and terms of overthrowing that is used very vividly by the [PMOI/MEK]. This culture and vocabulary are witnessed in most Telegram groups, including political groups and even social groups. We may not believe it that many of the so-called principalists groups, those who appear to be loyal to the [regime], are not safe from the influence of this organization’s hypocritical culture. This is the mysterious and low-profile ruling state that continues to be active even in the homes of our senior officials. These days we are witnessing how the children of these loyal individuals and insiders are literally drowned in cyberspace platforms heavily influenced by the [PMOI/MEK] and are not aware of this reality.”

Social media has changed the landscape of the revolution. The mullahs no longer control access to information, and the information is power. The people of Iran are closer to freedom than ever now, and the regime and its officials can no longer deny this fact.

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Europe Policy on Iran,Iran Deal,Iran Regime Change,Lord Maginnis,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,NCRI,PMOI

Lord Ken Maginnis

UK Lord Says European Lawmakers are “Divorced from Reality” on Iran Issue

Lord Ken Maginnis

Lord Ken Maginnis
Member of House of Lords in UK Parliament speaking at a Parliamentary committee asking for a firm policy on Iran

Lord Ken Maginnis, who sits in the United Kingdom’s Parliamentary House of Lords, called out European leaders who wish to preserve the status quo with Iran as “divorced from reality.”

The diversion between US and European attitudes towards the Iranian regime has appeared since the Trump administration took office. Under President Trump, the US has adopted a firmer stance towards the Iranian regime over its support of international terror and blatant human rights abuses. The President pulled out of the Iran nuclear deal and re-introduced economic sanctions.

However, Europe has been reluctant to follow the US’s lead. Many UK, French, and German lawmakers believe salvaging the Iranian nuclear deal is preferable to slapping economic restrictions on the Iranian regime and cutting off Iranian markets. Maginnis writes, “what they fail to take into account is the strong possibility that this and any other deal may be rendered null and void anyway, by domestically driven regime change.”

A Year of Unrest

2018 represented a year of unrest for the Iranian regime. What began in the nationwide uprising of December 2017, continued across all 31 provinces of Iran in the form of isolated protests among workers, teachers, students, merchants, truck drivers, investors, pensioners, and farmers.

Each time a protest emerged, and Iranians took to the streets, the regime responded with brutality and violence, imprisoning thousands of Iranians and torturing and executing many.  “But this did not prevent Iranians in countless localities from returning to the streets over and over again throughout 2018 to repeat provocative anti-government slogans and give shape to what was described as a “year full of uprisings” by Maryam Rajavi, the leader-in-exile of Iran’s democratic resistance movement,” Maginnis writes.

A Ten-Point Plan for Democracy

Mrs. Rajavi, the president-elect of the National Council of Resistance of Iran(NCRI), has a ten-point plan for restoring democracy in Iran. Her plan would see an Iranian government with democratic legitimacy, committed to the values of equality, secularism, and religious freedom.

What Europe fails to see is that Mrs. Rajavi’s dream is approaching reality. Demonstrations, both within Iran and abroad, are increasing in frequency and size. The MEK now has a host of support from prominent international politicians, including Donald Trump’s personal lawyer and former mayor of New York, Rudy Giuliani, and the National Security Advisor, John Bolton.

Last week, this was on display when governments from around the world convened in Warsaw at the behest of US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to discuss the Iranian threat. As the politicians convened, the MEK and its supporters staged protests to call on Europe to protect their national security interests, help bring stability to the Middle East, and protect the abused and downtrodden Iranian population by adopting a firmer stance towards the Iranian regime.

It is in Europe’s interests to do so. Maginnis charts the increased threat of Iranian state-sponsored terrorism poses to those across the globe. The regime was involved in terror plots on French, American and Albanian soil last year. It was also behind attempted assassinations in the Netherlands and Denmark. As the regime becomes more violent in the face of mounting internal challenges, Maginnis argues that to ignore the escalating Iranian threat is to be “divorced from reality.”

“The notion of internal moderation by the existing regime has been proved over 40 years to be a fantasy,” he writes. “But now that [the] regime is clinging to power with all the violence at its disposal, the long-term survival of that regime is revealing itself to be a fantasy as well.”

Maginnis is clear that he is not calling for the US and Europe to interfere in Iranian affairs to bring about regime change. He decries imposing regime change on a country that “is not ready for it.” But he is also clear to point out that Iran is increasingly resembling a country that is ready for it. By “encouraging support for the Iranian people who, under the leadership of the NCRI (National Council of Resistance of Iran) and Maryam Rajavi, have been making great strides toward democracy on their own.”

Maginnis concludes that it is becoming impossible to ignore the voices of the Iranian people who are overwhelmingly calling for regime change in the country. He asserts, “it is now time for the careless UK and European politicians to recognize the legitimacy of the Iranian Resistance and to help it in achieving its democratic aims.” He concludes, “it is long past the time for the reluctant UK and European Press to grapple with the moral reality of having downplayed the 40 years of pseudo-religious persecution of a people who know better, seek better, and deserve better.”

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Iran human rights,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,PMOI

MEK supporters Rally in Geneva

MEK Iran-Iranian Communities in Europe Prepare to Demonstrate Javad Zarif’s Arrival at the UN

MEK supporters Rally in Geneva

Rally in Geneva, to protest Iranian regime’s top diplomat terrorist the current Human Rights Council in Geneva-February 26, 2019

Iranian communities across Europe and supporters of the MEK will travel to the United Nation’s headquarters on the 26th of February to protest the arrival of Javad Zarif, the Iranian regime’s foreign minister. Between 2.30pm and 4.30pm, the Iranian opposition and their international allies will protest at Place des Nations and call for the Iranian regime and Javad Zarif´s immediate removal from the United Nations.

Rouhani's record of terror and executions in Iran

Rouhani’s record on violations of human rights during his tenure.

Zarif is part of the regime leadership that has organized at least 120,000 executions of Iranian citizens. It has routinely employed torture and terrorism. Medieval torture methods have been permitted to return to Iran, including stoning, eye gouging, and sleep deprivation.

The UN General Assembly has condemned the regime’s use of torture on 65 separate occasions, yet still welcomes regime figures into the UN General Assembly.

A Year of Shame

Speaking about the human rights abuses carried out in Iran, human rights group Amnesty International’s the Middle East and North Africa Research and Advocacy Director, Philip Luther, said, “2018 will go down in history as a ‘year of shame’ for Iran.”

The Iranian regime responded to a growing protest movement by intensifying its bloody crackdown on political dissent and free speech. The regime arrested at least 7,000 protestors in the twelve-month period, with many of them languishing in regime custody on arbitrary charges.

In December, Amnesty International revealed the findings of its investigation into the 1988 massacre of the People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK). The regime executed 30,000 MEK members in a single summer in 1988. The lack of international response, both at the time and since the massacre, has empowered the Iranian regime and led it to conclude that it can carry out violent human rights abuses with impunity.

Changing Times?

There are signs of change on the horizon, however, the change will only materialize if the Iranian community, both at home and abroad, applies pressure to international organizations like the UN.

Amnesty International issued a statement to the UN Human Rights Council calling for the group to investigate the Iranian regime and its conduct in 1988 in its next session.

It is in this vein that the Alliance for Public Awareness-Iranian Communities in Europe (APA-ice) invites all Iranians to participate in the upcoming demonstration in Geneva. It is up to the Iranian diaspora living in Europe to give their family and friends in Iran voices. The regime is doing everything it can to silence these voices, but they must, and will, be heard.

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Golrokh Iraee,Iran human rights,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,PMOI

Arash Sadeghi

Iranian Regime Denies Life-Saving Medical Care to Political Prisoner

Arash Sadeghi

Arash Sadeghi, a political prisoner, that has been denied medical care

The Iranian regime is once again refusing to allow a critically ill political prisoner access to lifesaving medical care. Arash Sadeghi has a rare form of bone cancer and is being denied a transfer for specialized medical treatment, despite the recommendations of his doctors and his deteriorating condition.

The 38-year-old Sadeghi was sentenced to 19 years in prison for his peaceful human rights activism, which included speaking to Amnesty International and media outlets about human rights and the illegal 2009 Presidential election in Iran. He was convicted of “acting against national security, attending protests, defamation of the supreme leader, forming illegal groups, and propaganda against the regime” and sentenced to 15 years. He had been given a four-year suspended sentence in an earlier trial, and this was added to his new conviction.

Sadeghi disputes these charges, saying that they were fabricated by the regime judiciary and the Revolutionary Guard Corps.

Sadeghi has had medical issues since being transferred to Raja’i Shahr prison in Karaj in June 2016. Physicians believe that his problems stem from an untreated shoulder infection that developed after surgery, leaving him with severe arm pain. Infections are common in Iranian prisons, where hygiene conditions are poor and medical care is substandard.

Sadeghi was finally sent to a medical center, where doctors found a malignant tumor in his shoulder and recommended that he be transferred immediately to a hospital where he could receive treatment for cancer. Prison authorities blocked this request, though, and denied all requests for further treatment. Sadeghi has even been denied checkups by prison doctors. Sadeghi was initially not even informed that he had cancer.

Sadeghi has been denied hospital care since September, and his shoulder infection continues to worsen. He is no longer able to move his right arm at all.

Amnesty International Campaign

Amnesty International launched a campaign in September in an attempt to compel the Iranian regime to transfer Sadeghi to the Cancer Institute. The Amnesty Campaign followed an earlier plea to the Prosecutor’s office in Tehran from Sadeghi’s family to authorize his transfer so that he could undergo further tests.

The Amnesty campaign stated: “Arash’s life is hanging in the balance – medical staffs are saying that “time is of the essence” … The Iranian authorities [need] to release Arash immediately and ensure he gets the specialized medical care he needs.”

The campaign gathered 11,000 signatures but was ignored by the Prosecutor’s office and prison authorities. Sadeghi is still badly in need of treatment.

The regime is well-known for its treatment of political prisoners. In 1988, the regime rounded up 30,000 political prisoners, most of them MEK members, and executed them in groups because of their political beliefs. The regime has still not been held accountable for this crime against humanity, despite calls from numerous human rights groups, including Amnesty International, and the families of the MEK members who were massacred.

Golrokh Ebrahimi Iraee

Golrokh Ebrahimi Iraee, Sadeghi’s wife, is also currently a political prisoner in an Iranian prison. Iraee was given a six-year sentence after security forces discovered a fictional story she had written in a journal during a raid of her home. Iraee’s story was about women who were stoned to death by the Iranian regime, a practice that is still in use today.

Iraee was hospitalized at the time of her trial and was unable to mount a defense on her behalf. The judge in her trial, Abolqasem Salavati, refused to postpone the proceedings until she could be present and convicted her in absentia of “collusion against national security,” “propaganda against the state,” “spreading lies in cyberspace,” and “insulting the founder of the Islamic Republic [regime Supreme Leader Ali Khameini]. Her conviction was upheld on appeal.

Sadeghi went on a 71-day hunger strike to protest his wife’s sentence. The strike received international attention but left him with a number of health issues.

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Human Rights,Iran Economy,Iran Terrorism,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,NCRI,PMOI,Robert Torricelli

Senator Torricelli's interview with INTV

Senator Robert Torricelli Believes “a Lot” of Nations Support Regime Change in Iran

Senator Torricelli's interview with INTV

Robert Torricelli, who served as the United States senator from New Jersey from 1997 to 2003 participates in a private interview with Iran NTV, the satellite TV program affiliated with the Iranian opposition-February 2019

In the wake of the Warsaw conference earlier this month, there have been signs the world is beginning to take note to the Iranian threat. The conference, organized by US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, saw 65 governments come together from across the globe to explore ways of applying pressure to the Iranian regime in response to its destabilizing activities across the Middle East and rampant human rights abuses.

Alongside the conference, the Iranian resistance held vast rallies condemning the regime and outlining its plan for bringing democracy to Iran. The rallies garnered international attention and brought an increasing number of high-profile political figures into the ranks of its supporters.

One such supporter, Senator Robert Torricelli who spoke at the People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran’s (MEK’s) rally in Warsaw, appeared on INTV, the television station run by the Iranian resistance, to discuss the importance of a united international coalition against Iran.

“The dictatorship in Iran is not simply a regional problem,” he said, “the terrorist activities of the regime in Tehran is a global concern.” The Iranian regime intensified its terror activities abroad in 2018. A string of high-profile terror attacks saw the regime plan bombings in Albania, the US, and Paris, as well as a number of assassination attempts in both the Netherlands and Denmark.

Speaking about the Warsaw conference, Torricelli went on, “I think it would have been a mistake to just bring together regional nations. It was important to have a global look… about first containing and eventually eliminating this regime.”

While the Iranian regime’s destabilizing activities are felt most ardently in the Middle East, the threat of Iranian state-sponsored terrorism poses is not limited to Middle Eastern nations.

A Growing International Interest in Regime Change?

Torricelli also seemed to acknowledge a growing appetite for Iranian regime change in embassies across the globe. “I don’t have any doubt that the United States was talking about regime change,” he said. “My guess is a lot of other nations that may have ambassadors in Tehran also support regime change but they’re more careful with their words.

Demonstrating the need for regime change, Torricelli spoke of the widespread suffering the clerical regime has caused among the Iranian population. “We’ve lost a generation of Iranian people,” he said, “generations have been born who’ve never had a free government. Kids going to school and having no jobs. Children without enough food. People can’t speak their minds, really choose their leaders,” he said.

He also acknowledged the growing calls for regime change among Iranians, both within Iran, living under the weight of regime rule, and abroad. “Look at the streets of the cities and towns of Iran. Look at the young people. Look at the universities. Look at those who are standing up,” he said. “Look at the people who put their lives on the line. They’re not thousands, they’re hundreds of thousands of Iranians around the world, who with the right government would come back and rebuild Iran.”

He concluded, “you look at those young people. There’s your leaders. You see the conference we do in Paris every year (the MEK’s annuals Grand Gathering event). Mrs. Rajavi (president-elect of the Iranian opposition) speaks. Look at her and those people around her. There’s your leaders.”

Staff Writer

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1988 Massacre,Amnesty International Report on 1988 massacre,HRC40,Iran human rights,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,PMOI

HRC40

Amnesty International Issues Written Statement to the UN Urging an Investigation into Iranian Human Rights Abuses

HRC40

40th session of the United Nations Human Rights Council will discuss Iranian regime’s violations of Human Rights in Iran

The fortieth session of the United Nations’ Human Rights Council (UNHRC) will convene on February 25th and run until March 22nd, 2019. Of particular note will be the fourth item on the agenda, a written statement by Amnesty International, the human rights advocacy group that enjoys special consultative status within the UNHRC.

Amnesty International’s written statement explicitly calls on the UNHRC to investigate and report on the Iranian regime’s sustained crimes against humanity. It said that the impact UNHRC Special Rapporteurs could have on the situation could save lives, reduce suffering and demand accountability.

Forced Disappearances

In particular, Amnesty International is calling on the Human Rights Council to investigate “the forced disappearance of thousands of political dissidents over the past 30 years, including many who were under the age of 18 at the time of the arrest.”

The recommendation comes just months after Amnesty International released a damning report following its own investigations into the regime’s 1988 massacre. The group found that the regime had executed thousands of members of the political opposition group, the People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK).

“While it may appear that these crimes belong to a distant past, the pain and anguish inflicted on the family members of the victims is both severe and current,” the statement read. The Iranian regime continues to withhold information regarding the whereabouts of the victims, preventing their families from disposing of the remains according to their religious or cultural rituals.

Most of the bodies were disposed of in unmarked graves at undisclosed locations that remain concealed to this day. Amnesty International puts the death toll at around 5,000, however, some estimates suggest up to 30,000 political prisoners, mainly MEK members and other political dissidents were killed in the summer of 1988.

The Iranian regime has not taken any action to bring those accountable for these forced disappearances to justice. Quite the opposite, current Iranian president, Hassan Rouhani, has filled his cabinet with a number of prominent regime figures who played an active role in the 1988 massacre. “They have also subjected survivors, families of victims and human rights defenders to reprisals for seeking truth and justice.”

Amnesty International’s statement read, “for years, Iranian officials at all levels have sought to disguise, distort, and “justify” the mass extrajudicial executions.” They have denied the scale of the massacre and attempted to pass the deaths off as “battlefield deaths”.

A Crumbling Wall of Secrecy

In recent years, events have chipped away at the regime’s wall of secrecy surrounding the 1988 massacre. Leaked official records have revealed the planning of the executions. In response, the regime has intensified efforts to vilify and demonize the victims, labeling them “murders,” “terrorists,” and drug addicts.

Beyond the 1988 massacre, even today, the Iranian regime arbitrarily detains journalists, protestors, dissidents, lawyers, activists, religious and ethnic minorities, trade unionists, and members of the MEK. While in regime custody, prisoners are also routinely subjected to torture and inhumane living conditions.

“This succession of grave human rights violations committed in Iran is inextricably linked to the impunity the Iranian authorities have enjoyed,” Amnesty International wrote.

The statement concluded with the human rights group urging “states to break this link, to speak openly and firmly about Iran’s ongoing crimes against humanity.” Amnesty International calls on the UNHRC to find the location of the remains of the victims killed in 1988. It also asks that the UN protects the victims’ family members from harassment and intimidation and puts an end to arbitrary detention in Iran.

Finally, the group asked for the UN to “identify effective pathways to justice, truth and reparation with a view to ensuring those suspected of responsibility are prosecuted in fair trials, without imposing the death penalty.”

 

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