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The protester that raises her arm as a symbol of resistance, while stepping out of teargas

One Year Later: A Summary of Protests in Iran in 2018

The protester that raises her arm as a symbol of resistance, while stepping out of teargas

The photo symbolizes the December 2017 uprisings in Iran that has not stopped and has continued in forms of protests and strikes across the country.

December 28th marks the one year anniversary of the nationwide uprising that mobilized people from all walks of life to take to the streets in protest of Iran’s theocratic regime. The protests began in Mashhad on December 28, 2017, and spread to over 140 cities in every province in Iran over a two week period.

The initial protests were in response to the economic disaster facing the country. Poverty, corruption, inflation, and rising unemployment drove many Iranians into the streets to protests. But as the uprising grew in strength and numbers, the demonstrators began to protest the regime itself.

Protesters chanted, “Death to the dictator!”

“Death to [Supreme Leader] Khamenei!”

“Khamenei shame on you, let go of your rule!”

One year later, Iran is still the scene of daily protests and demonstrations against the authoritarian regime. The protesters have made it clear that they will not be satisfied until the ruling regime is toppled and democracy is restored to Iran.

The MEK has played a leading role in the protests taking place across Iran. As the movement to topple the mullahs’ regime has grown, the people have sought a viable alternative to the corrupt dictatorship that has destroyed Iran’s economy and environment, and that has oppressed its people for the past four decades. The MEK offers a democratic alternative that will restore freedom to Iran.

Iran News Wire summarized protest activity in Iran over the past year. The following is a summary of their report:

January

Recorded Protests: 643

Daily Average: 21

The uprising that began in December 2017 continued into January, and protests took an anti-regime turn in the month of January. Protesters set fire to Basij bases and tore down images of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei.

February

Recorded Protests: 596

Daily Average: 21

March

Recorded Protests: 422

Daily Average: 14

April

Recorded Protests: 452

Daily Average: 15

May

Recorded Protests: 1,093

Daily Average: 35

June

Recorded Protests: 475

Daily Protests: 16

 

In June, bazaar merchants in Tehran launched a large-scale strike in protest of the failing economy and rising prices. Protesters in Khoramshahr took to the streets to protest water scarcity.

Protests quickly turned to calls for regime change, with chants of “Death to the Dictator!”, “Death to Rouhani!”, “Death to Khamenei!”, and “Our enemy is right here, they lie when they say it’s the U.S.!”

Women played a key role during the protests in Khorramshahr and in Khuzestan in southwest Iran.

July

Recorded Protests and Strikes: 970 in cities and regions

Daily Average: 31

August

Recorded Protests: 133

Daily Average: 20

September

Recorded Protests: 1,367 in 293 cities, villages and business and industry regions

Daily Average: 46

Iran’s truck drivers began their nationwide organized strike in September.

October

Recorded Protests: 1,533 in 323 cities, villages, and business and industry regions

Daily Average: 49

October saw the most protest activity in Iran in 2018. Truck drivers, teachers, and bazaar merchants all went on strike in October.

November

Recorded Protests: 911 in 171 cities, villages, and business and industry regions

Daily Average: 30

Iranian truck drivers went on another round of strikes in November, as did Iran’s teachers.

The workers of the Haft Tappeh Sugarcane Factory workers in Shush and the Iran National Steel Group workers in Ahvaz also began striking in protest of months of unpaid wages. Their weeks-long strikes would attract international attention.

Head of Iranian Regime’s Judiciary Threatens Striking Workers

December

Recorded Protests: 273 as of December 21st

Daily Average: 9

Workers, credit union clients, retirees, students, and prisoners all protesters during the month of December.

The regime arrested a number of striking Ahvaz steelworkers and Haft Tappeh factory workers in an escalation of their previous attempts to suppress the strikes. Regime agents carried out a series of midnight raids on the houses of striking workers and arrested dozens of workers. Reports indicate that labor activist Esmail Bakhshi was tortured in prison.

Iranian truck drivers started their fifth round of strikes this month as well. Those numbers are not included in the report, which will be updated by Iran News Wire in January.

Staff Writer

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Demonstrations in Mashhad, Iran- December 2017

History of Iranian Uprising since December 2017

Demonstrations in Mashhad, Iran- December 2017

Archive Photo- Demonstration in Mashhad against the high prices – December 2017

On December 28, 2017, a protest began on the streets of Mashhad that triggered an uprising that continues on eight months later.

This new wave of protests has been marked by continuity. But the uprising can be divided into three main phases. Mojahedin.org reported on the three phases of the current uprising taking place in Iran.

Phase One

The first phase started on December 28, 2017 with a protest about inflation. It quickly mutated into a series of anti-government protests targeting the regime as a whole. The protests lasted until January 6, 2018. Though the uprising has ebbed and flowed, it has continued in one form or another since then.

Phase Two

The second phase of the uprising started in March 2018, at the beginning of the Iranian New Year.

The Ahwazi Arabs began protesting on March 28, 2018. The farmers of Isfahan took to the streets after the start of the new year, taking the lead in the uprising. The farmers had already begun protesting for water rights before the beginning of the new year. The authorities cracked down on the farmers, making widespread arrests.

On April 14th, the people of Kazerun began weeks of protests for freedom. Four protesters were killed when security forces opened fire upon a crowd of protesters in May.

On May 10th, teachers went on a nationwide strike in 34 cities across Iran. Their strike had a major impact on the next events in the uprising.

The border city bazaars went on strike in April and May, and on May 14th the strikes spread to Tehran’s Grand Bazaar and then to other cities.
On May 22nd, Iran’s truckers began a nationwide strike that spread to almost every province in the country. The strike had a deep impact on the regime. The strikes were widespread, highly visible, difficult to suppress, and enjoyed popular support. The truck drivers strikes drew a great deal of attention to the regime’s incompetence.

Phase Three

On July 23rd, Iran’s truck driver’s began their second round of strikes. The regime made a number of concessions and promises for reform after the first round of strikes, but most of these had gone unfulfilled.

 

On July 31st, the industrial workers of the Shapur district in Isfahan were joined by other citizens of Isfahan in a grand uprising after the plunge in value of the rial. The uprising quickly spread to a number of other cities, including Shiraz, Karaj, Arak, Mashhad, and Tehran. Calls for regime change were reported by the MEK network inside Iran within the first day of protests.

The third phase of the Iranian uprising is currently in progress. Protesters are asking for the same things they have asked for in past uprisings: Freedom, economic opportunity, human rights, and a free and democratic government.

Characteristics of the Current Uprising

 

Since the mullahs took power in the 1979 revolution, there have been a number of protests and uprisings. These protests and uprisings may be organized into three major cycles.

 

The Iran student protests of 1999:

 

These protests consisted mostly of students and resulted from an internal power struggle between “reformists” and conservatives within the Iranian regime. Protesters hoped to find a solution within the existing political system.

 

 

The 2009 Iranian election protests:

 

These protests included the middle and upper classes of Iran and also resulted from internal struggles between “moderates” and conservatives. In contrast to the 1999 protests, the 2009 protests were not limited to students and included Iranians of different education levels, ethnicities, and origins. The protests were widespread, including virtually every major city. And while protesters initially hoped to find a solution within the system, as the protests grew and spread, that hope was abandoned and the protesters turned on the regime as a whole.

 

2017-present uprisings:

 

The ongoing uprising is fundamentally different in nature from past protest movements. These difference could lead to its eventual success in overthrowing the regime.

 

Protesters are looking outside of the system for answers. The Iranian people have learned that the myth of the moderate is a lie. Rouhani promised reform during the election and has failed to follow through on a single promise. The MEK network has repeatedly reported chants of “Moderates, conservatives, the game is over!” at protests. Protests on issues as diverse as water access and economic stability turn to calls for regime change within hours. The people are done with the lie that “moderates” are willing or able to change the system.

 

Second, the current uprising is unprecedented in its duration. The uprising has lasted for over eight months. In the almost 40 years of the mullahs’ rule, no wave of protests has ever lasted this long. This is despite the brutal crackdown by the regime.

 

Third, the protests are comprised of a wide range of Iranians from across the political spectrum and from every class, ethnicity, and occupation. Farmers, merchants, truckers, and industrial workers are all marching side by side for freedom. Young people march for a secular government, while religious protesters go to Friday prayers and turn their backs on regime-backed prayer leaders, chanting, “We turn our backs to the enemy, and embrace the country!” Fully chador-clad women join protesters on the streets after Friday prayers, chanting, “Our enemy is right here, they lie about it being America!”

 

Finally, the Iranian regime is in a tailspin due to its corruption, mismanagement, incompetence, and sanctions. In the past, the mullahs have been able to use oil profits to cover for their incompetence. But the economy is no longer able to sustain decades of mismanagement. Experts estimate Iran’s inflation rate is between 100-200 percent per year, and the rial has dropped 100 percent in value against the U.S. dollar in the past six months alone. With the economy in free fall, the mullahs may have lost any leverage they once had to deal with dissent from the people.

 

The people are no longer afraid of the regime’s security forces. Phase three may be the final phase of the uprising.

Staff Writer

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Kazerun protest in May 2018

Iranian Regime Requires a Firm Approach

Kazerun protest in May 2018

A scene of the massive protest in Kazerun against regime’s repressive measures- May 2018

U.S. President Donald Trump’s historic summit with Kim Jong Un of North Korean in Singapore culminated in a joint statement by the two leaders promising security guarantees from the United States in return for North Korea’s “firm and unwavering commitment to complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.”

The exact details of the agreement remain to be seen, and the timeframe will prove vital to its success or failure. It is clear, though, that having a firm policy helped the outcome.

 

An editorial on ncri-iran.org made the case that, whether dealing with North Korea or Iran, the underlying issues are the same. “[W]hen dealing with rogue regimes that suppress their own people, firmness is the only appropriate approach. History tells us that the policy of appeasement, under any pretext, is a recipe for war and more instability.”

Lobbyists for the Iranian regime and advocates for appeasement toward the regime repeatedly state that taking a tough stance against the regime would lead to war. This is a false notion that denies the Iranian people the right to change the regime that is responsible for their oppression. Those who favor appeasement claim that regime change will lead to chaos and uncertainty. This deception, while impressive in its drama, is no longer effective. The time for appeasement has passed.

The “‘echo chamber’ has lost its power.”

 

Though Iran and North Korea differ in a number of areas, these differences only strengthen the need for a strong policy to deal with the “regime’s nuclear ambitions and meddling in other countries as well as its support for international terrorism.”

 

First, unlike North Korea, the Iranian regime has the goals of expansion and exportation of terrorism and fundamentalism. They achieve these goals through the destabilization of other countries. This pillar of their survival is part of their constitution.

Second, Iranian society, despite the regime’s efforts at suppression, is characterized by unrest, with a volatile population that protests daily for change. A nationwide uprising began last December and spread to 140 cities, with cries for regime change echoing across the country. Protests since then have been constant and widespread. Protests in Ahvaz and other cities in Khuzestan Province lasted over a week. Farmers in Isfahan protested for days. Anti-regime protests even broke out at Friday prayer sermons, which are the regime’s official platform.

 

Massive protests in Kazerun basically led to the people controlling the city for almost a week this May. The regime was only able to regain control of the city after sending in additional security forces, killing at least four protesters, and making concessions to the protesters. A large-scale strike by truck drivers over the past two weeks has further destabilized the regime. The MEK has helped to organize all of these protests and to mobilize the people in protest.

Third, Iran has a long history of fighting for democracy and freedom. The people of Iran are not strangers to fighting for regime change.

 

Fourth, there is a viable alternative to the oppressive regime in Iran, which can both lead the movement for regime change and govern the nation during the transition after the regime is overthrown. The National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), of which the MEK is the largest member, represents the aspirations of the Iranian people for freedom, and it represents and embraces people from all political identities and religious and ethnic minorities.

A firm policy toward Iran would prevent the regime from taking advantage of the past policy of appeasement by the West that has allowed the mullahs to flourish for decades. Currently, the Iranian economy is on the brink of collapse, and trade will not save it, even from its traditional allies.

 

Establishing a firm policy toward the Iranian regime while siding with its people is indeed the only way to prevent war and to move toward peace in the region. The people of Iran and their resistance movement, specifically the MEK, are equal to the task of regime change. The task of the world’s governments is to abandon the policy of appeasement toward Iran and create a firm policy that will make a lasting peace.

Staff Writer

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Truck drivers protest in solidarity with their fellow truck drivers in more than 240 cities.

MEK – Iran Protests Rise by %233 During The Month of May

Truck drivers protest in solidarity with their fellow truck drivers in more than 240 cities.

Striking truck drivers raise their hands in solidarity with other strikers in more then 240 cities across the country.

Reports from MEK network inside Iran indicate a major rise in protests in Iran in comparison to the month of April. A report by “our Iran” confirms the rise in protests in the month of May.

Our Iran published a summary highlighting the increase in protest activities in May. The month of May saw protests spread like wildfire across Iran’s urban and rural population. 1093 individual protests took place, an average of 35 a day, with people from all walks of Iran’s population putting down their work and taking part. Poultry workers stood aside truck drivers, laborers, and teachers, united in their shared disgust for the tyrannical regime.

There has been a marked increase in protest activity. April saw an average of 15 protests a day across Iran. May more than doubled this figure. The bulk of the May protests came from striking truck drivers, whose strikes affected 285 of Iran’s cities.

Striking Truck Drivers

Between May 22nd and June 2nd, heavy vehicle drivers in all 31 of Iran’s provinces put down their keys and turned off their engines in an act of defiance. They had plenty to protest. The mullahs have increased insurance prices, highway tolls, and cargo commission rates, in a thinly-veiled attempt to further line their own pockets. Illegal charges, job shortages, and exorbitant vehicle repair prices left the truck drivers with little money for themselves.

The plight of the nation’s truck drivers attracted the attention of other industry sectors. The leader of Iran opposition, Maryam Rajavi, pledged her support and encouraged others to stand with the drivers in a gesture of solidarity. As a result, taxi drivers, minibus drivers, and petrol truck delivery drivers joined the strike, leaving gas stations empty and long queues of cars waiting to fill up.

Tehran’s Taxi Drivers Strike

Taxi drivers at Tehran’s Imam Khomeini Airport also put down their keys to protest their inability to enter the traffic area to pick up patrons. Their plight also inspired others, with taxi drivers across Iran joining their cause, and that of the truck drivers. Taxi drivers in a total of 11 provinces joined the strike in protest at their own appalling working conditions.

A Wide Array of Labour Protests

May saw no less than 249 individual labor protests across 62 of Iran’s cities. The majority of these were born from discontent over non-payment of salaries, unfair dismissals, and closures of factories. Railway workers, coal miners, sugarcane workers and factory workers were among those that coordinated strikes against the regime.

Protestors from Plundered Investors

38 separate protests came from plundered investors. These investors lost their savings after the mullahs looted credit institutions. In Rasht, angry protestors tore down a statue of the head of the central bank of Iran, Saif. In Tehran, demonstrators threw eggs and tomatoes at the doors of the monetary prosecutor’s office, the Trade Bank, and the Future Bank. In another protest, investors conducted a sit-in outside the Central Bank. They blocked the street, and cars prevented cars from moving.

Protests from the Elderly

On May 11th, the retired population of Iran took to the streets to vent frustrations of their own. Pensioners in Iran frequently do not receive payments, and when they do, they are so meagre that they are forced to live in appalling conditions. Retired teachers, steelworkers, and petrochemical workers took to the streets to demand a fairer and more reliable pension system.

Teachers Protests

Teachers accounted for 38 protests across 34 cities in May, a fivefold increase of teacher strike activity for April. The Council for the Coordination of Teachers Organizations called on teachers across Iran to strike over unpaid wages, discrimination, and limited job stability. Like the MEK, the Council has been instrumental in coordinating resistance to the clerical regime.

The teachers faced a violent response from the regime’s agents. They targeted the striking education workers and beat them up, targeting female teachers. Many of those in attendance, including members of the Teacher’s Association, were arrested for their involvement in the protests.

Student Resistance

Iran’s student population was also vocal in its criticism of the clerical regime. They raged against systematic corruption, the regime’s involvement in university affairs, the plundering of student’s tuition, cutting educational terms, and the unplanned movement of university locations. 12 cities saw student protests in May, showing a renewed determination from Iran’s youth to risk their lives and their freedom to have their opinions heard.

Tehran’s Market Strike

On May 12th, Iran’s shopkeepers and market stall owners closed their stalls and shops for business. They were protesting a high exchange rate and significant price fluctuations, causing economic uncertainty for them and their families.

Iconic shopping areas of Tehran were deserted. The Kuwaiti Bazaar, Sadaf Passage, sections of Cyrus Street, and the Aladdin Passage were among the areas affected by the strike. Merchants in Baneh continued their strike after the closure of border crossings impacted their supply routes. They lifted the strike after the regime promised to address their demands. However, when the regime failed to deliver any reforms, they merchants and shopkeepers of Baneh resumed their strike on May 15th, in solidarity with their brothers and sisters in Tehran.

Kazerun’s Protests

Kazerun became the site of clashes between the regime’s forces and the enraged Iranian public. After protestors gathered to air their discontent at plans to divide the city, the Iranian security forces opened fire on those in attendance. Four citizens were killed, starting a period of public mourning which saw the local amenities shuttered.

The people got their wish. The government backed down on its plans to divide the city. However, it cost four martyrs their lives and many more their freedom after the authorities carried out widespread arrests.

Shahrud’s Protests

Merchants at the Shahrud Grand Bazaar went on strike over the regime’s proposal to move the Roads and Transport Department out of Shahrud. The Iranian authorities wanted to move the government department to Semnan, taking with it many of Shahrud’s employment opportunities. After intense public pressure, the regime conceded and backed down on its plans to move the department.

Naser Malek Motie’s Funeral

On May 27th, the Iranian public turned out for the funeral of Iranian film icon, Naser Malek Motie. The actor and cinematographer suffered at the hands of the Iranian regime throughout his life and represented a beacon for supporters of the opposition movement. The funeral soon turned into an anti-government protest as those in attendance began chanting anti-government slogans. Agents loyal to the regime attempted to disperse the crowd, firing tear gas, however, the brave mourners would not be moved.

The tireless work of the MEK orchestrated the May protests, providing Iran’s youth with a beacon of hope for a brighter future for Iran. The growing number of protests in May shows the burning desire for regime change in Iran, despite all the repressive measures has not changed, but grown by 233% in comparison to the protests in April.

Staff Writer

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Iranian diaspora will gather to support Iran Protests

Europe Must Not Become the Jimmy Carter of 1977

Iranian diaspora will gather to support Iran Protests

Iranians in Europe and America, will gather in Paris this June to show support for Iran Protests

In 1977, Iran was on the precipice of change. Yet on December 31st, US President Jimmy Carter described Iran as an “island of stability in one of the more troubled areas of the world”. Ironically, just a few months later, Iran would become engulfed in protests against the Shah’s regime and the country, which once appeared so stable, underwent drastic changes.

Today, Iran appears to be in a similar situation to 1978. Protests litter Iran. The people take to the streets at every given opportunity to display their displeasure towards the Iranian regime. On Sunday, May 27th, the Iranian public gathered to celebrate the life of film star, Naser Malek Motiei at a large public funeral service. It quickly transformed into a demonstration against the mullahs and their clerical regime, as protesters began chanting “death to the dictator, hail to Naser!”

Elsewhere, a truck driver strike has raged for more than a week. Truck drivers went on strike in hundreds of cities across all 31 Iranian provinces to vent their frustration at poor working conditions and unfair tariffs imposed by the regime. Despite petrol stations sitting empty, and long queues, the drivers have the support of the people. They know the difficulty Iran’s industries are facing without the existence of trade unions and the greedy mullahs imposing harsh taxes, fees, and tariffs at every opportunity.

In Kazerun, initial protests against the regime grew in intensity after the Iranian security forces opened fire on protestors. Four protestors were killed in the incident, leading to further public outcry and demonstrations at the martyr’s funerals.

In the last full week of May, there were more than 489 individual acts of defiance and protest against the regime. This amounted to some 69 protests every day. They were not limited by geography or demographic either, students, farmers, teachers, truck drivers, and shopkeepers were among those that took to the streets. In Tehran itself, strikes from local market stall owners left many shops and stalls closed.

The Regime’s Repressive Measures Will Not Work This Time

The regime has responded to the widespread protests with violent reprisals and repressive measures. They arrested protestors, fired on them with live ammunition, resorted to threats and blackmail, and carried out torture on suspects in prison. But the people will not be deterred.

Fury drives the Iranian public. Fury at their economic circumstances, poverty is rife across Iran, as is unemployment and drought. They know that without regime change, they have no chance of escaping a life of poverty. The mullahs’ and Rouhani’s regime divert the flow of money into their own pockets. Corruption is widespread. Until these issues are addressed, the people will not be silenced. This is why the regime’s violence and barbaric suppression tactics will not work.

The more protests erupt, the more the people can see regime change on the horizon. Each act of protest inspires the next. This momentum in Iran’s opposition movement is loosening the mullahs’ grip on power.

The most recent spate of protests has also been far better organized and coordinated than anything in Iran’s history. The People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK) has played a central role in the organization of the protests. With a strong organizational network and widespread public support, the protest movement can only get stronger.

Europe’s Role

Europe is in danger of echoing Jimmy Carter’s position in 1977. The Iranian public has demonstrated their hunger for regime change. The protest movement within Iran is gathering steam, and the position of the mullahs looks untenable.

Europe would be well-placed to avoid financial investment in Iran. Iran has no future with Rouhani and his cronies. The sooner Europe realizes that, the better.

Staff writer

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Iran Protests in Kazerun

MEK Network: Protests in Kazerun Continue Despite Regime’s clampdown

Protests continue in Kazerun

Iran Protests continues in Kazerun, despite repressive measures and mass arrests of the youth by IRGC forces.

Protests continue to rage in Kazerun as the youth of the province remain determined to vent their frustrations with the clerical regime. The protests continued throughout the night on Thursday the 17th of May, and into the morning of Friday the 18th of May.

The protesters turned out in spite of intense repressive measures taken from the regime. On Wednesday, the regime’s state security forces opened fire on protesters, killing two and leaving many more injured.

The mullahs have also brought in anti-riot units from nearby Isfahan and beyond to arrest protesters and quell the demonstrations. The security forces attacked the demonstrators with rubber bullets and tear gas canisters, leading to a number of injuries.

Clashes between the regime’s forces and the protesters broke out in several locations. Vehicles were burnt, as were several government centers. Protesters used burnt tyres and cars to block the roads and prevent the movement of the Revolutionary Guards and more anti-riot units.

Silencing Voices

Iran Protests in Kazerun

MEK Network: Protests in Kazerun Continue Despite Regime’s clampdown

The regime’s agents have threatened the citizens of Kazerun with severe repercussions for anyone that shares information about the situation in the province. The regime is adamant that no information be leaked to the international press and no protesters lying in the hospital be allowed to share their stories. The regime disconnected Kazerun’s internet in an attempt to silence the public and prevent news of the protests spreading across the country.

The official line from the regime, as reported by IRNA news agency, is that some people attempted to “set the Friday prayer’s place on fire” in Kazerun. Mullah Khorsand said, “some people on Friday morning broke one of the doors of the Friday prayer’s place in Kazerun and threw firebombs inside, which resulted in serious damage to an air conditioner”. The Deputy Governor of Fars province, Hadi Pajouhesh Jahromi, added that “the protesters burned a bank building on Friday morning and damaged the public property”.

The mullahs repeatedly asserted that the “situation in this city is completely under control”, calling the clashes “scattered skirmishes”, and urging the public “to ignore and not trust the news broadcast in the social media and foreign networks”.

Standing with the Protesters

The leader of the Iranian opposition, Maryam Rajavi, expressed messages of solidarity with the brave protesters. Rajavi hailed the heroic martyrs in Kazerun, called for the release of those imprisoned by the regime, and urged the Iranian public to assist those that are wounded.

Her message for the international community was to dispatch a UN delegation to the country. She urged a representative for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights to visit the country and see the mullahs abuse of Iranian citizens for themselves.

The US Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo pledged the support of the Trump administration. He tweeted a message of solidarity with the Iranian protesters on Friday morning (May 18th). It read, “we support the Iranian people who are demonstrating against an oppressive government. 3 deaths & internet disruption show the regime’s true nature”.

Staff Writer

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Iran Protests in Kazerun-May 2018

Two Protestors Killed as Demonstrations Intensify in Kazarun

Iran Protests in Kazerun-May 2018

Brave people of Kazerun took it to the streets again to protest against Iranian regime’s repression.

On Wednesday, the 16th of May, demonstrators in Kazaroon resumed protests in defiance of Iran’s clerical regime. The city’s market was closed, and shopkeepers refused to open their stalls in protest. Hundreds of protestors took to the streets to vent their frustrations at proposed changes to the city’s boundaries.

With slogans directed squarely at the regime, the people chanted, “our enemy is right here” and “beware of the day we will be armed”. Expressions of solidarity also rang out, with chants of “do not be afraid, we are all together”.

The demonstrations began outside the city’s government offices. However, the State Security Forces took measures to block the protester’s access to the building. The regime resorted to repressive and violent strategies to restore order, arresting around 30 demonstrators.

The mass arrests prompted protestors to gather outside the police station and the headquarters of the security forces. The demonstrators demanded the release of their loved ones from custody in an effort to disperse the crowd, the security forces fired tear gas and fired live ammunition into the air. The people showed their resolve and determination and would not be moved. Then the regime’s agents opened fire on the crowd. Two young people were killed and many more wounded in the confusion.y.

Maryam Rajavi, president-elect of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) hailed the heroic martyrs of Kazerun and the city’s brave and bereaved people. She has called for the immediate release of those arrested and urged her compatriots to rush to the aid of those wounded. Mrs. Rajavi also called for the dispatch of a UN investigative delegation and a representative of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights to examine the situation first hand.

The protestors defended themselves against the unprovoked violence. They threw stones and wood and set a police station alight. Clashes continued across the city until the early hours of the next day, when reinforcements for the clerical regime entered the city from Shiraz.

The Iranian Resistance movement has urged international human rights groups for assistance in securing the release of those imprisoned.

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Iran MEK: Kazerun Protests Continue Despite Heavy Security Measures

Iran MEK: Kazerun Protests Continue Despite Heavy Security Measures

Iran MEK: Kazerun Protests Continue Despite Heavy Security Measures

Iran MEK: Kazerun Protests Continue Despite Heavy Security Measures

On April 20, protesters in the city of Kazerun took to the streets for the fifth consecutive day. The people of Kazerun are protesting the regime’s plan to split the city into two pieces. Thousands of residents have turned out for days of demonstrations, including many of the city’s youth and a large number of women. Protesters came out for the demonstrations despite the presence of heavily-armed anti-riot forces.

During the five days of protests in the Shohada (martyrs) square, demonstrators have chanted a number of slogans at the suppressive forces sent to quell the uprising. Among them were:

“Here’s the dignity of the people of Kazerun!”

“God is great, with such dignity by the people!”

“Honorable Iranians, support us!”

“Honorable Kazerun, hail to your dignity!”

“Our state TV is a disgrace!”

“We are ready to defend Kazerun.”

Do not be afraid, do not be afraid, we are all together!”

“We swear to the blood of the martyrs that we shall gather every day at the martyrs’ square!”

“We do not accept humiliation!”

“While our enemy is right here, they keep saying America is the enemy!”

“We are the men and women of battle; we fight against the separation plan!”

In an earlier statement, Kazerun’s Friday Prayers leader said that the regime had decided to pause its plan to divide the city. He and the fake city council went on to order the protesters to disperse and to forbid them from gathering until a final plan is made for the city. Protesters have ignored these words and have continued their demonstrations, demanding that their governor responds to the protests.

Shahin Gobadi, a member of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI)’s Foreign Affairs Committee posted a video clip provided by MEK network inside Iran on his Twitter Account:

 Residents of Kazerun are opposed to the regime’s plan to split their city, saying that the move is a misguided attempt to resolve problems resulting from years of corruption and mismanagement.

Staff Writer

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