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Iranian regime court will be charging 5 arrested environmentalists for "heavy charges:

The Iranian Regime Targets Environmental Activists in a String of Arrests and Suspicious Deaths

Iranian regime court will be charging 5 arrested environmentalists for "heavy charges:

Five environmental activists arrested nine months ago will be facing charges of “corruption on earth”. This is while Farshid Hakki another environmentalist was murdered outside his home last week.

The clerical regime in Iran has brought charges against five environmental activists arrested nine months ago. The five will appear in court on charges of “corruption on earth”, although the regime previously charged them with espionage charges.

Environmental activists have been the target of the clerical regime in recent months. On October 17th, environmental activist Farshid Hakki died in suspicious circumstances near his home in Tehran.

The state-run news networks and IRGC media outlets reported that the cause of Hakki’s death was self-immolation. However, the Iranian opposition, the People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK) remains skeptical.

Suspicious Deaths of Activists

Environmental activists have been subject to extreme violence and physical abuse at the hands of the regime. In January, IRGC intelligence officers arrested several activists, among them was Dr. Kavous Seyyed Emami, a former director of the Wildlife Agency.

Iran says prominent environmentalist committed suicide in a Tehran prison

Emami died shortly after his arrest while he was in regime custody in Evin Prison. The regime absolved itself of responsibility and claimed that the Emami had committed suicide.

In the wake of the national uprising at the start of the year, the regime claimed that at least 14 prisoners that died in custody committed suicide or died due to drug use. The National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) asserts that in reality, the prisoners died due to the regime’s violent and brutal use of torture.

Mohammad Reza, the head of the parliamentary environmental faction voiced his concerns. “The arrest of a number of environmental activists… is suspicious”, he said, “and the death of Dr. Seyyed Emami in prison is unfortunate and increases the ambiguity regarding the charges against the detainees”.

The MEK has previously reported the dangers of arbitrary arrests and fabricated charges. The regime’s increased weaponization of the judicial system to silence critics is an indication of its vulnerability.

In an attempt to preserve its weakening grip on power, the regime is locking up activists and political opponents.

The Iranian resistance movement and the MEK remains vehemently opposed to the regime’s misuse of justice and crimes against humanity. The President-elect of the Iranian opposition, Maryam Rajavi, have repeatedly called on the international community to stand with the abused Iranian people and condemn the regime’s actions.

The MEK and NCRI have urged international NGOs and governments to establish a delegation tasked with investigating the abuse of political and environmental activists in Iranian prisons and the 14 suspicious deaths that occurred in custody.

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Iranian regime officials express fear about upcoming protests in Iran

Regime Officials Predict Riots and Revolt on State Media

 

Iranian regime officials express fear about upcoming protests in Iran

Photo Credit: The Media Express- Iranian-Americans gathered in New York protest against the Iranian regime president invitation to the United Nations, calling for regime change in Iran-September 2018

A recent analysis published at the official website of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) revealed that regime officials fear that the people will revolt and overthrow the regime. Iran’s economy has taken a nose-dive, while the Iranian Resistance movement, led by the MEK, has gained momentum. Regime officials are terrified that these two factors will lead to the end of the mullahs’ regime.

The MEK came to this conclusion through close scrutiny of recent comments by regime officials in state media. A large number of the comments made contained dire warnings about the future of the regime, using words such as “enemy,” “mistrust,” “dangerous times,” and “current conditions.”

Regime Minister of Information and Communications Technology Mohammad Javad Azari Jahromi openly discussed the ramifications of the “social gap” and the “trust gap” caused by his own regime. In an October 12th interview on state-run TV, he said:

“What will become even more transparent these days is the social gap between various classes. We are facing a reality that there is a trust gap, with people knowing officials will not live up to their pledges. We shouldn’t deny this. Why should we? The reason is that they see our actions differ from our words, and this is seen in different fields of work.”

Regime economic expert Hossein Raghfar spoke of his concern that the economic crisis in Iran will lead to food shortages, further uprisings, and an eventual revolt by the people.

Raghfar said:

“Those who are living on subsidies, they have nothing. We are heading towards riots. These riots are due to economic insecurity. Workers who haven’t been paid, how are they supposed to provide for themselves…and this leads to riots. All these riots will be taking shape.”

Raghfar is right to worry about a revolt. The economic crisis is due to decades of corruption and mismanagement by the regime. U.S. sanctions have aggravated a problem that was ongoing when the current uprising began last December. The people are angry, and they are ready to overthrow the mullahs.

Raghfar expressed concern that the pressure from the economic crisis might manifest as mental health issues, such as depression. This has been true for many years under the repressive Iranian regime. He also worried that petty crime would increase as a result of economic insecurity.

“A worker that doesn’t get paid has no solution but to revolt,” he commented.

Raghfar also fretted about the so-called “brain drain,” which is a process in which the country’s most talented citizens leave Iran to find better opportunities elsewhere, leaving the already-struggling regime with few people with the ability to address its problems.

He went on: “There will be other riots, seen in the country’s brain drain. There will also be riots against themselves, such as suicides. Other people will be suffering from psychological damage, such as depression. This is another kind of riot in and of itself. And yet another riot is the rise in crime.”

Finally, Raghfar predicted that Iran’s inflation rate could rise to 80-90% by the end of the year, which would likely signal the end of the regime.

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Looted credit firm clients demand their money back.

Looted Credit Firm Clients in Mashhad Demand Return of Their Savings

Looted credit firm clients demand their money back.

A group of looted credit firm clients protest outside one of the branches, demanding their savings to be returned to them.

On Thursday, clients of the regime-linked Padideh credit firm protested in Mashhad for the return of their looted savings. Suppressive forces were dispatched to prevent the protest from spreading, and several people were arrested after security forces attacked the demonstrators, report MEK network inside Iran.

The rally in Mashhad followed a similar rally on

Keshavarz Avenue in Tehran on October 14th by clients of the Padideh and Caspian credit firms.

Protesters at that rally chanted:

“We will sacrifice our lives for freedom! Down with this cruelty!”

“Our three branches pass us to each other, leaving us in limbo!”

“Hands behinds the scenes, what have they done with our money?”

“We shall fight, we may die, yet we will not accept living in shame!”

“Theft has become legal under the cloak of law!”

Hamidreza Jalalipour, one of the regime’s experts frequently cited by the regime, warned against the spread of protests like these, which is what the regime fears most.

In an interview on state TV, Jalalipour said: “We must answer to the people’s demands… you must answer so that the society becomes calm… If we don’t pay attention to these demands, it will become concerning and I can show how since last year these protest rallies are changing and these changes must be taken seriously.”

He went on to say: “In the past year, the people’s measures have changed… Just take a look, during the past year (and even during the 1979 revolution), we had never witnessed violence. However, in the protests of the past 12 months, we have been witnessing violence… people were angry, upset; they have difficulties, people have lost their money, yet banks were set on fire and they headed towards the prosecutor’s office… These are dangerous measures. These are concerning issues that we should be all worried about. The people’s measures must be responded to. It shouldn’t result in unrest, protests, and God forbid, violence, and then strikes… if you look at the big picture, things will get serious.”

Ahmad Hamzeh, a member of the regime’s Majlis (parliament), acknowledged that there was cause for alarm. He warned that widespread poverty could unleash a wave of jobless and hungry Iranians who would revolt.

“Do people have to pour into the streets for us to hear their voices?” he asked.

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Widespread child malnutrition as a result of poverty in Iran

Regime Official Acknowledges Widespread Child Malnutrition, Extreme Poverty is to Blame

Widespread child malnutrition as a result of poverty in Iran

While the Iranian regime spends billions to prop up the Syrian dictatorship, millions of Iranians are living under absolute poverty line.

An official linked to the Iranian regime has acknowledged the devastating effect that extreme poverty is having on the Iranian population. The Deputy of Health and Support of the Hamedan Provincial Relief Committee revealed to the state-run ISA that the province was suffering from a crisis as cases of malnutrition in children have exploded.

Ali Bahiraei said, “3,083 children under the age of six in Hamadan province suffer from malnutrition”. He was of no doubt that extreme poverty was behind the worrying figures.

A Crippling Economic Crisis

Iran is in the midst of a devastating economic crisis brought on by decades of economic mismanagement and pandemic corruption. In the last six months, the rial has lost approximately half its value against the dollar, crippling Iranians purchasing power and leaving many in the grips of extreme poverty.

More than 75% of the Iranian population in Sistan and Baluchistan provinces live in conditions of poverty. Many struggles to purchase enough food to feed their families.

The Chairman of Tehran’s Council, Mohsen Hashemi, said that the mullahs’ “quick and careless formation of policies” has taken its toll on the economy, prompting a wave of inflation that shows no sign of letting up.

Alarm Bells are Ringing

Bahiraei is not the first regime official to raise their concerns over rising food shortages. Two MPs, one from Sistan and Baluchistan and another from Zahedan, also highlighted the problem in interviews.

Mohammad Amini Fard, the representative for Sistan and Baluchistan said the province “ranks as the worst such province” for food shortages. He also commented that the province “ranks very low regarding development and unjust wealth distribution, and unfortunately due to the lack of natural resources and an 18-year drought, the province is facing an enormous food shortage”. As a result, many villagers are leaving the province and heading to nearby cities.

Amini Fard’s comments are supported by University studies which show the province’s population has a smaller height and lighter weight than the rest of the Iranian population.

The parliamentary representative for Zahedan, Alim Yar Mohammadi told a similar story. “The people of this province’s villages don’t have adequate drinking water or even bread. By any standards they are living in very poor conditions”, he said.

The malnourished population are also at risk of disease, exacerbated by their emaciated conditions. Diseases and illnesses are spreading in the worst affected areas.

The conditions are also forcing rural villagers to fight for their survival. Mohammadi said, “when the people of the province don’t enjoy adequate food supplies, it is highly likely people will start eating the meats of animals such as cats and crows.” The villages in the south of the province are the worst affected.

A Humanitarian Crisis?

What began as an economic crisis, is quickly becoming a humanitarian one. Villagers from rural communities are heading to the outskirts of cities in search of work and food. These people are homeless, jobless, and in a desperate state. But the cities are offering little in the way of salvation.

Those that are able to earn a living as street vendors, face harassment and violence at the hands of regime officials.

These victims of malnourishment need help. Not beatings. But under this bloody and violent regime, they will find only further economic distress, repression, and violence.

 

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Abduction of the Teachers' union leader Hashem Khastar

Activist Teacher Abducted by Iranian Regime

Abduction of the Teachers' union leader Hashem Khastar

The teachers’ union leader Hashem Khastar was abducted by the Iranian regime agents in response to the teachers’ nationwide strike in Iran

On Tuesday, Hashem Khastar, a local union leader who represents teachers in Razavi Khorasan province in north-eastern Iran, disappeared from his family’s farm outside of Mashhad. His wife and friends tried to call him, but his phone was turned off. His car was left near the farm.

The following day his wife, Sadigheh Maleki, called authorities, to ask for information about her husband. On Wednesday, she received a call from a member of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), who said that Khastar had been hospitalized for mental illness.

Maleki went to Eben’e Sina Hospital in Mashhad to find her husband, but security forces were blocking anyone from going near the area where he was being held.

Khastar has no history of mental illness, nor does he has any physical ailments other than high blood pressure, which is common for a man of his age. Khastar is, however, a retired teacher who has been a vocal critic of the regime. He recently participated in peaceful protests in support of better working conditions for teachers.

Khastar served prison time for his education activism in the past, most recently from 2009 to 2011. He has openly criticized Iran’s educational system and the regime as a whole, going so far as to call regime Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei a dictator.

After the two-day teacher’s strike earlier this week, Khastar wrote a letter criticizing the regime.

“We don’t have guns,” he wrote.  “Our guns are our pens and our words and our gatherings and sit-ins. The guns are in the hands of those who protect lawless, tyrant, cruel rulers instead of defending the rule of law. They defend those who steal millions and yet arrest petty thieves and cut off their hands and legs.”

On the day before he was abducted, Khastar wrote a passionate appeal to the Iranian people, which he sent to several Persian websites for publication. He wrote that “Iran would soon be free from this hell.” He also implored the Iranian people to rise up against the regime, writing, “Your children in prison can write a short letter and repent to easily be released from prison and live their own lives. But they teach the people the lesson of resistance by saying no to tyranny. They teach the people that one can stand against tyranny like other nations to realize freedom and democracy.”

Khastar wrote that Khamenei was “the root of the corruption and all the problems” and must be held accountable.

Authorities abducted Khastar without a warrant and hospitalized him without evidence of any physical or mental illness. It is unclear at this point how Khastar ended up in a psychiatric facility. He could have possibly been injured during his arrest or authorities may have locked him in a psychiatric facility in order to sedate him. It does seem clear that Khastar was hospitalized for his activism and not for his health.

Khastar’s message echoes that of the MEK, which has been fighting to overthrow the corrupt and brutal theocracy and restore democracy to Iran. The MEK’s Resistance Units have worked with teachers to organize protests across the country to improve working conditions for teachers and free those who have been imprisoned for their activism.

Iran’s teachers are demanding that the authorities provide further information about Khastar. They have further renounced the regime for its role in his abdication and its treatment of the retired teacher.

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Iranians protest against regime's expansion of terrorism in Europe.

Protesters in Europe Condemn Regime’s Terrorism and Surge in Executions

 

Iranians protest against regime's expansion of terrorism in Europe.

MEK supporters (main body of the National Council of Resistance of Iran-NCRI) protest the recent surge in executions in Iran and the spread of regime terrorist activities in Europe-Brussels, October 2018

MEK supporters in Europe have joined the Iranian people in their protests against the mullahs’ regime by staging demonstrations in London and Belgium.

MEK Supporters’ Demonstration in London

On Sunday, protesters demonstrated outside of 10 Downing Street in London to protest the recent surge in executions and human rights violations by the Iranian regime, particularly those that are occurring in Iranian prisons, as well as their terrorist acts against the MEK. The protesters also showed their support for the protests and strikes currently taking place in Iran.

The demonstrators also hope to draw attention to the 1988 massacre of 30,000 political prisoners by the Iranian regime. The executions, which occurred over the course of a single summer, have never been investigated, and their perpetrators have never been brought to justice.

The MEK supporters hoped that bringing these issues to light would cause British Prime Minister Theresa May to apply pressure to the regime

Protesters at the rally chanted: “Down with Rouhani! Down with Khamenei!”

“Change! Change! Change! Regime change in Iran!”

A group of British dignitaries and representatives of the Iranian diaspora in the U.K. were present at the demonstration and gave speeches. The speakers called on the international community to hold the Iranian regime responsible for its acts of terrorism against the MEK, for its violent suppression of the popular uprising currently taking place in Iran, and for its exportation of terror.

In her speech, NCRI supporter Naghmeh Rajabi said: “There needs to be more pressure to bring a halt to all of these executions, especially the public hangings that are happening.

Children, people, normal people are walking in the streets and they see bodies hanging from cranes. That’s kind of becoming a normality in Iran and it is completely unacceptable in the twenty-first century.”

The speakers also emphasized the need to blacklist the Ministry of Intelligence and Security (MOIS) and the Revolutionary Guards (IRGC), especially after the foiled terrorist attack on the Iranian opposition gathering in Paris on June 30th of this year.

Demonstration in Brussels

On Monday, MEK supporters in Brussels demonstrated outside of the European Union headquarters to protest executions, human rights violations, repression of women, and terrorist acts against the MEK in Europe by the Iranian regime.

The protesters called upon the E.U. to end the policy of appeasement toward the mullahs’ regime and to blacklist the Ministry of Intelligence and Security (MOIS) and to expel all regime diplomats.

The Belgian news agency Belga, Dubai TV, and Al Arabiya all covered the rally. Reports from each news outlet included coverage of the June 30th foiled attack on the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) gathering in Paris and the regime’s culpability in the terrorist plot.

The Belga report read, “The demonstrators accused Tehran of blueprinting this plot.”

Al Arabiya published a report summarizing the plot to attack the NCRI gathering and the arrest of regime diplomat Assadollah Assadi for allegedly masterminding the plot. In October, a report by French intelligence concluded that there was “no doubt” that the Iranian regime ordered the terrorist attack. Assadi is currently in Belgium awaiting trial on terrorism charges resulting from the terrorist plot.

Former MEP Paulo Casaca was one of many dignitaries to speak at the rally. In his speech, he said, “I was among the people who were there on June 30. So I can say that, even personally, I have a case here to the European External Action Service (EEAS) and there has not been a single word from the EEAS on the issue.”

The protesters condemned the European Union for not speaking out against the regime’s human rights abuses.

We expect EU today to break the silence. We want EU to be active and to be on the side of Iranian people,” said NCRI member Firouz Mahvi

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Long sentences for young protesters in Iran

Five Young Women Receive Prison Sentences for Publicly Protesting in Iran

Long sentences for young protesters in Iran

The Iranian youth participating in protests receive long sentences.

This week, the Iranian regime sentenced several protestors arrested in August protests. Iran Human Rights Monitor (HRM) reported on October 22nd reported that five young women arrested during the protests had received prison sentences of between 6 and 12 months.

Yasamin Ariani, aged 23, and 19-year-old Saba Kordafshani, will both serve one year behind bars at Tehran’s infamous Evin Prison. Azer Heydari will also serve one year in prison. The other two, Mozhdeh Rajabi and Niloufar Homafar, both received six-month sentences from the Iranian regime Judiciary.

The circumstances under which Yasamin Ariani was arrested prompted outrage from the Iranian public and drew condemnation from the People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK) and other Iranian opposition groups.

Yasamin was arrested and taken to Quarchak Prison after helping an elderly woman who was pushed to the ground by the regime’s anti-riot police.

Harsh Sentences

The sentences appear to be part of a coordinated effort from the clerical regime to administer particularly harsh sentences on those involved in protests. Last week, the regime sentenced six supporters of MEK to between 8 and 18 years in prison. They were charged for burning the images of the regime Supreme Leader Khamenei during last year’s protests.

Iran Human Rights Monitor released a list of 18 protestors that had been arrested and sentenced for participating in the December and January protests. The protestors, all of whom are serving their prison sentences at the Great Tehran Penitentiary, were administered exceptionally harsh sentences and subject to cruel and immoral punishments.

Alireza Shir Mohammad Ali was charged with three “crimes”, “spreading propaganda against the establishment”, “insulting Ali Khamenei” and “disrupting public opinion”. He received a five-year sentence and 200 lashes.

Barzan Mohammadi, a Kurdish prisoner, is serving a six-year sentence for similar crimes. He was also lashed a total of 100 times.

The full extent of the regime’s crimes against its population becomes clear when confronted with the figures of those arrested. Agents of the clerical regime arrested more than 8,000 protestors during the December and January uprisings.

Of these 8,000, at least 14 have died in custody, likely due to extensive torture and beatings at the hands of guards. Further reports emerged this month of guards using electric cattle prods, sticks, and batons to beat inmates into submission.

Several inmates have reported fractured bones and concussion.

Condemnation from International Human Rights Organisations

Amnesty International called for the immediate and unconditional release of all those arrested during the protests. They also urged the international community to call for an “impartial and independent” investigation into the suspicious circumstances surrounding the death of 26-year-old Reza Otadi, who died during a protest in Karaj.

So far, the international community has remained silent and Amnesty International’s pleas have not been heard. These young women, as well as the thousands of more Iranians sitting behind bars, and their families in Iran need the international community to be their voice. How many more innocent people have to be flogged, beaten and imprisoned before Europe and the West say enough is enough?

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Retirees protest in Iran

Retirees Protest Mullahs’ Failed Economic Policies

Retirees protest in Iran

Retired people protest the low salaries below the poverty line in Iran

September and October have brought Iranians from all walks of life into the streets to protest the corrupt regime, as the mullahs’ dictatorship teeters dangerously close to collapse. The regime’s failed economic policies, along with crippling U.S. sanctions, have led to a tsunami of poverty throughout the country. The Iranian regime funds wars and terrorist groups throughout the Middle East, but its own people suffer from poverty, skyrocketing inflation, water shortages, and rampant unemployment.

On October 16th, retired Iranian across the country protested against regime policies that have left them to live in poverty. The retirees protested the snowballing economic catastrophe brought on by the regime’s incompetence and mismanagement, including the alarming rate of inflation and the increase in the cost of living. The economic crisis has been particularly hard on the elderly population of Iran.

According to Jamshid Taqizade, managing director of the National Retirement Fund, Iranian retirees “have lost 67% of their purchasing power and live with hardship in very poor conditions.”

 

One retiree spoke of how the retirees’ plight has led young people to join the MEK’s Resistance Units. He said, “[O]ur present situation has disastrous consequences for the youths. They foresee no future for themselves. Our condition leaves young people realizing that life is getting worse for them, therefore they choose to challenge the regime by joining the resisting [MEK Resistance] Units and uprise.”

Many of the protesters were retired teachers, who said that their pensions are less than half of the other retirees. One retired teacher said this about living in poverty: “We are fed up with poverty and having no money. After three decades of teaching, our pension only covers ten days of our expenses. What are we supposed to do for the rest of the month?”

Sources report that protests took place in a number of cities, including Isfahan. The retirees chanted: “No Gaza! No Lebanon! No Syria! My life for Iran!”

U.S. Department of State Spokesperson Heather Nauert voiced her support of those participating in the nationwide strikes in Iran, tweeting this from her official State Department Twitter account.

“We are following the reports of nationwide strikes in #Iran. We support the right of the Iranian people to peacefully express their rightful demands. These strikes have a message for the regime: stop wasting Iran’s wealth abroad and start addressing the needs of your own people.”

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Statement by the MEPs call on blacklisting the Iranian regime

Ten MEPs Issue a Statement Calling for the Iranian Regime to be Added to an EU Blacklist

Statement by the MEPs call on blacklisting the Iranian regime

A statement signed by a large number of MEPs express concerns about the Iranian regime’s terrorist activities in Albania, targeting MEK, and call on EU to blacklist the Iranian regime.

On October 20th, ten members of the European Parliament (MEPs) from nine different countries came together to issue a statement on the Iranian regime’s vilification of the People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK).

Members of the Iranian opposition group are currently living in exile in Albania. They have been the subject of extensive social media campaigns aimed at discrediting and demonizing them and their President-elect, Maryam Rajavi.

The ten MEPs called on the European Union to add the Iranian regime’s Ministry of Intelligence and Security (MOIS) to its terrorist blacklist over its persistent deployment of violence against the MEK.

A Campaign of Violence

The statement comes at the tail-end of an aggressive campaign of aggression towards the MEK. In June, an Iranian diplomat, Assadollah Assadi, was arrested by European authorities for his involvement in a plot to attack the MEK at its annual Grand Gathering in Paris.

Assadi, an explosives expert, had provided a Belgian-Iranian couple with homemade explosives and detailed instructions on how to carry out the attack, which planned to use an explosive-laden car to wreak death and destruction on the members of the Iranian opposition in attendance.

Iranian agents had also previously been arrested and expelled in Albania. The Albanian authorities uncovered a similar plot to attack MEK members at their compound near the Albanian capital during the Persian New Year celebrations.

In conjunction with the regime’s campaign of violence, the regime has embarked on a coordinated online campaign aimed at demonizing the MEK and swaying international opinion.

Twitter recently suspended 770 accounts with suspected ties to the Iranian regime. Many of the accounts posted damaging and derogatory content about the MEK and other Iranian opposition groups.

The accounts were operating under the guise of foreign journalists or US citizens to influence public opinion in the United States and across the Western world. Between the 770 accounts, 10 million anti-MEK and pro-regime Tweets were published. Some of the Tweets also attacked the regime’s enemies in the Middle East, including Saudi Arabia and Israel. They also shared links to regime-affiliated media outlets.

A Threat to the Refugees in Albania

The MEPs’ statement called on the Albanian government to expel the Iranian agents operating in the country and place the Iranian regime on the EU and the US list of international terror organizations.

As the world saw with the case of Assadi, many agents operate outside of international law. Their covert operations undermine the Albanian government’s authority. The presence of the regime’s agents has a destabilizing effect on any country they operate in.

Should the European Union heed the advice of its MEPs, it would strike a blow to the Iranian regime at a time when it already faces increasing domestic and international pressures.

Inclusion on a European blacklist would mean visas are no longer granted to the regime’s agents, and those already operating on EU soil would likely be expelled.

This would go some way towards dismantling the regime’s web of terror across Europe and curb its ability to launch an international terror attack like the one it had planned in Paris.

The European community and the world cannot afford to postpone its action until after there is a devastating attack on European soil resulting in a significant loss of human life. The EU and its heads of state must be proactive and add the clerical regime to its terrorist blacklist.

If it doesn’t, there is no predicting how catastrophic the next terror attack could be, both for the MEK, and native European citizens caught up in the chaos.

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Iran protests in every sectors of the society

Iran: Protest Movement Grows as Regime Weakens

Iran protests in every sectors of the society

The protests in Iran continues over the high corruption, human rights abuse and the repressive measures the government is taking in response to the legitimate calls for change.

A rising wave of protests has swept across Iran in response to the snowballing crises overtaking the Iranian regime. Reports from MEK’s network inside Iran indicate new protests and strikes arise each day among every sector of Iranian society as the ongoing uprising against the corrupt and incompetent regime reach a fever pitch.

Firefighters Protest

Firefighters in Shadegan gathered outside of the Khuzestan’s governate office to demand an increase in pay. The protesters represented 300 firefighters who have not been paid in nine months.

Youth Protests

In Behbahan, youth protested again against unemployment at the Friday prayer site. The protesters rallied because authorities are hiring non-locals to work at the nearby refinery while the town’s youth are left without jobs.

Truck Drivers’ Strikes

Iran’s truck drivers finally forced the regime to concede to three of their demands after three weeks of continuous strikes. This is the third strike by Iranian truckers this year. The striking drivers, who have received international support from trade unions, have been subjected to mass arrests and threats of execution by the regime.

Credit Firm Clients’ Protests

Clients of the Caspian credit firm gathered outside of the regime’s Central Bank in Tehran to demand the return of their looted money by the Revolutionary Guards-linked financial institution.

During the rally, the protesters chanted: “The bankrupt government is sitting on our money!”

In the city of Rasht, plundered clients of the Caspian credit union gathered in front of the Caspian branch in a downpour of rain to demand the return of their sacongs.

They chanted:

“Our life’s work has been stolen and plundered!”

“We’ll continue our protests until our money is returned!”

“Our money has been stolen and we can’t put food on the table!”

In Tehran, clients of the Kuye Farzan credit company gathered outside the mayor’s office to protest. They held a banner that read, “We are requesting houses and criminals to be handed over to the judiciary.”

Also in Tehran, clients of the Sekeye Thaman credit company gathered in front of the public prosecutor’s office to demand that their stolen savings be returned to them.

Livestock Workers’ Strikes

On Monday, livestock workers in Haft Tappeh went on strike to protest pressure imposed by regime officials.

Municipality Workers’ Protests

On Monday, municipality workers in Shushtar rallied outside of city hall to demand their paychecks that have been delayed for the past six months, due to a privatization measure that the employees did not agree to.

Students’ Protests

On Saturday, a group of Ph.D. students from across Iran rallied in Tehran to protest the lack of foreign currency based on government rates. This policy was promised by education officials and not honored. The rally was held despite threats by education officials.

On Monday, students at Sanandaj Open University in western Iran protested the decision by officials to eliminate the field of nursing one week into courses.

Factory Workers’ Protest

Factory workers in the Albroz Industrial Complex in Qazvin Province held a rally to protest the withholding of their pensions for the past 14 months.

Teachers’ Strikes

Nationwide strikes by Iran’s teachers have spread to 103 cities, according to the most recent reports, and continued for their second day on Monday.

Sources report that all teachers are on strikes in the cities of Qeshm, Ahvaz, Poldokhtar, Ravansar, Rafsanjan, Zarineh and Babol. The strikes have also spread to Mashhad, Marivan, Isfahan, Hamedan, Karaj, Homayounshahr, Shahinshar, Ahvaz, Baneh, Ravansar, Divandareh, Shiraz, Sanandaj, Sari, Langrud, Saqqez, Khomeini Shahr, Kermanshah, and many other cities.

The nationwide strikes began on Sunday to protest low pay and benefits, inability to form labor unions, failure of the regime to implement agreed-upon policies, and poor learning environments for students.

Teachers have also demanded the release of their imprisoned colleagues.

Students in a number of cities have voiced their support for their striking teachers.

Strikes have become a popular means of protest since the massive anti-regime uprising began in Iran last December. Iranians from every social class and sector of society have joined together in raising their voices against the mullahs’ regime, with thousands taking to the street to protest and many closing their shops and refusing to enter their places of business. The MEK works each day to organize these diverse groups of people in their shared goal of overthrowing the corrupt regime and bringing democracy back to Iran.

Staff Writer

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