Posts Tagged ‘Mujahedin-e Khalq’

Iran Protests,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI),NCRI,PMOI

Iran's security forces suppressing the peaceful protests in Iran

MEK Reports: Iran’s Youth See Arbitrary Arrests as Major Issue

Iran's security forces suppressing the peaceful protests in Iran

Archive Photo- Young demonstrators resist repressive forces during Iran protests – January 2018

The problems of arbitrary arrests and detention in Iran are serious issues in a time when the people are rising up in protest of the corrupt and brutal regime and its policies.

The Iranian regime can find any excuse to arrest its citizens and uses arrest and detention to maintain an atmosphere of fear in the country. Anyone may be found suspicious under the mullahs’ regime, no matter what their activity or their innocence. The youth of Iran commonly refer to their country as one big prison. In this oppressive environment, there is no room for independent thought. The people are allowed to believe what the government tells them to believe and nothing else, upon pain of imprisonment.

The United Nations held International Youth Day on Sunday, August 12th, to draw attention to issues affecting young people, particularly the need to safe spaces for youth to congregate without fear of violence. The U.N. states that young people should be free “to engage in governance issues,” but in Iran a seven-year-old child was shot in the face with tear gas a week ago by security forces attempting to disperse a protest. The problems in Iran are more complicated than they are in the rest of the world.

 

The youth of Iran have spent the last four decades standing up to a corrupt and medieval clerical regime. They have protested again and again against the tyrannical dictatorship, despite extreme suppressive measures. They have been betrayed by the so-called moderates and their promises of reform, and they are done. The youth of Iran demand change.

The greatest concern of today’s youth in Iran is the shocking rate of arbitrary detentions. United States Secretary of State and noted Iranian rights activist Mike Pompeo said that 5,000 Iranians were arrested in January after the beginning of nationwide protests across Iran. According to the MEK network inside Iran, some of those arrested remain in prison today. Their families are afraid to share details of their fates for fear of retaliation by the regime.

A statement by Amnesty International indicated that minorities in Iran were being arrested without cause. Amnesty specifically mentioned the case of

Ibrahim Nouri, an Azerbaijani Turk activist who remains imprisoned in Iran. The statement also mentioned 120 Azerbaijanis who were arrested in July and August after attending two separate Azerbaijani Turkic cultural gatherings.

On Friday, a soccer match at Tehran’s Azadi Stadium turned into a scene of protest when fans of the Tractor Sazi football club led chants of “Death to the dictator!” during the match. The chants spread throughout the stadium, and security forces, who were already positioned throughout the crowd to prevent such a protest, stacked the protesters. Security forces clashed with the mostly young men, and 43 people were arrested. MEK sources reported that some of the protesters were beaten by security forces during the clashes.

Families in Ahwaz have gathered at Sheyban Prison to determine the fate and location of their children. Numerous young boys and girls were taken to prison, with many dragged from their houses by security forces, according to locals. Some of these youngsters’ only crimes are internet activism. A few have been arrested for simple acts, such as writing poems in Arabic or performing rap songs.

Over the last few months, people in Khuzestan Province have been increasing their protests for water. Many of the protesters have been arrested for the crime of asking the government for clean, accessible water and water to irrigate their crops. Ahwazi Human Rights activist Karim Dahimi said that many of those who have been arrested have no access to lawyers, they end up staying in prison. Some of the prisoners are accused of supporting enemies of the state, such as the U.S.

The Tonekabon Revolutionary Court in Mazandaran Province is now handing down group sentences. One such sentence was recently given to a group of eight prisoners.

Maryam Rajavi, President-elect of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), has expressed her support for the recent protests in Iran. “I salute all the women and youth who waged a staunch resistance today against the criminal revolutionary guards, Basij, and plainclothes agents.”

Please follow and like us:

Continue Reading

#FreeIran2018,Iran Protests,Isfahan,Kazerun,Maryam Rajavi,mashhad,MEK,MEK Network,Mujahedin-e Khalq,PMOI

Demonstrations in Mashhad, Iran- December 2017

History of Iranian Uprising since December 2017

Demonstrations in Mashhad, Iran- December 2017

Archive Photo- Demonstration in Mashhad against the high prices – December 2017

On December 28, 2017, a protest began on the streets of Mashhad that triggered an uprising that continues on eight months later.

This new wave of protests has been marked by continuity. But the uprising can be divided into three main phases. Mojahedin.org reported on the three phases of the current uprising taking place in Iran.

Phase One

The first phase started on December 28, 2017 with a protest about inflation. It quickly mutated into a series of anti-government protests targeting the regime as a whole. The protests lasted until January 6, 2018. Though the uprising has ebbed and flowed, it has continued in one form or another since then.

Phase Two

The second phase of the uprising started in March 2018, at the beginning of the Iranian New Year.

The Ahwazi Arabs began protesting on March 28, 2018. The farmers of Isfahan took to the streets after the start of the new year, taking the lead in the uprising. The farmers had already begun protesting for water rights before the beginning of the new year. The authorities cracked down on the farmers, making widespread arrests.

On April 14th, the people of Kazerun began weeks of protests for freedom. Four protesters were killed when security forces opened fire upon a crowd of protesters in May.

On May 10th, teachers went on a nationwide strike in 34 cities across Iran. Their strike had a major impact on the next events in the uprising.

The border city bazaars went on strike in April and May, and on May 14th the strikes spread to Tehran’s Grand Bazaar and then to other cities.
On May 22nd, Iran’s truckers began a nationwide strike that spread to almost every province in the country. The strike had a deep impact on the regime. The strikes were widespread, highly visible, difficult to suppress, and enjoyed popular support. The truck drivers strikes drew a great deal of attention to the regime’s incompetence.

Phase Three

On July 23rd, Iran’s truck driver’s began their second round of strikes. The regime made a number of concessions and promises for reform after the first round of strikes, but most of these had gone unfulfilled.

 

On July 31st, the industrial workers of the Shapur district in Isfahan were joined by other citizens of Isfahan in a grand uprising after the plunge in value of the rial. The uprising quickly spread to a number of other cities, including Shiraz, Karaj, Arak, Mashhad, and Tehran. Calls for regime change were reported by the MEK network inside Iran within the first day of protests.

The third phase of the Iranian uprising is currently in progress. Protesters are asking for the same things they have asked for in past uprisings: Freedom, economic opportunity, human rights, and a free and democratic government.

Characteristics of the Current Uprising

 

Since the mullahs took power in the 1979 revolution, there have been a number of protests and uprisings. These protests and uprisings may be organized into three major cycles.

 

The Iran student protests of 1999:

 

These protests consisted mostly of students and resulted from an internal power struggle between “reformists” and conservatives within the Iranian regime. Protesters hoped to find a solution within the existing political system.

 

 

The 2009 Iranian election protests:

 

These protests included the middle and upper classes of Iran and also resulted from internal struggles between “moderates” and conservatives. In contrast to the 1999 protests, the 2009 protests were not limited to students and included Iranians of different education levels, ethnicities, and origins. The protests were widespread, including virtually every major city. And while protesters initially hoped to find a solution within the system, as the protests grew and spread, that hope was abandoned and the protesters turned on the regime as a whole.

 

2017-present uprisings:

 

The ongoing uprising is fundamentally different in nature from past protest movements. These difference could lead to its eventual success in overthrowing the regime.

 

Protesters are looking outside of the system for answers. The Iranian people have learned that the myth of the moderate is a lie. Rouhani promised reform during the election and has failed to follow through on a single promise. The MEK network has repeatedly reported chants of “Moderates, conservatives, the game is over!” at protests. Protests on issues as diverse as water access and economic stability turn to calls for regime change within hours. The people are done with the lie that “moderates” are willing or able to change the system.

 

Second, the current uprising is unprecedented in its duration. The uprising has lasted for over eight months. In the almost 40 years of the mullahs’ rule, no wave of protests has ever lasted this long. This is despite the brutal crackdown by the regime.

 

Third, the protests are comprised of a wide range of Iranians from across the political spectrum and from every class, ethnicity, and occupation. Farmers, merchants, truckers, and industrial workers are all marching side by side for freedom. Young people march for a secular government, while religious protesters go to Friday prayers and turn their backs on regime-backed prayer leaders, chanting, “We turn our backs to the enemy, and embrace the country!” Fully chador-clad women join protesters on the streets after Friday prayers, chanting, “Our enemy is right here, they lie about it being America!”

 

Finally, the Iranian regime is in a tailspin due to its corruption, mismanagement, incompetence, and sanctions. In the past, the mullahs have been able to use oil profits to cover for their incompetence. But the economy is no longer able to sustain decades of mismanagement. Experts estimate Iran’s inflation rate is between 100-200 percent per year, and the rial has dropped 100 percent in value against the U.S. dollar in the past six months alone. With the economy in free fall, the mullahs may have lost any leverage they once had to deal with dissent from the people.

 

The people are no longer afraid of the regime’s security forces. Phase three may be the final phase of the uprising.

Staff Writer

Please follow and like us:

Continue Reading

#FreeIran2018,Free Iran 2018,Iran Protests,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,PMOI

MEK's popularity in Iran

Regime Experts Admit MEK’s Major Role in Recent Protests

MEK's popularity in Iran

A recent Infographic distributed over the internet, challenging the Iranian regime’s misinformation about the lack of popularity for MEK (the principal opposition to the regime) in Iran

While for years the Iranian dictatorship and its lobbies had denied MEK’s major support at home, and by running smear campaigns had tried to misinform the International audience from the popularity of the main opposition among Iranians inside and outside the country, the recent positions by various high officials prove differently.

A series of protests have spread throughout Iran’s cities since July 31st, in response to the terrible economic situation and the spread of poverty across Iran, the mismanagement of water and electricity and carelessness of the regime towards bare necessities of Iranians while spending billions to prop up the dictatorship in Syria. People from all walks of life have taken to the streets to protest the regime’s failed economic policies. Though the protests were sparked by economic unrest due to the latest plunge in the rial’s value and resulting increase in costs, outrage among the protesters soon turned to the regime and its leadership, particularly the Supreme Leader, Ali Khamenei. Chants of “Death to the dictator!” and “Death to Khamenei!” were heard in Isfahan, Karaj, Tehran, and other cities and towns across Iran. The role of MEK during these demonstrations has been essential in mobilizing and expanding the anti-regime protests.

The following are some of the quotes that have been made by regime officials and “experts” over the past few weeks as protests have ramped up to the current widespread uprising.

On July 3, 2018, Hassan Rouzi-Talab gave an interview to Vatan-e-Emrooz State Daily. Rouzi-Talab is an IRGC expert on the MEK. He made the following statements in the interview, admitting MEK’s widespread support in the social media :

“The MEK has been on top of the social media scene from the start. They attract political activists in the streets and ordinary people and convince them to be MEK resources.” He went on to talk more about the MEK’s role in social media.

“More than 70% of calls to protest and video coming out of the protests… are related to MEK channels. Massoud Rajavi [one of the founders of the MEK] has issued five statements about the protests and clashes since December which is really unprecedented in recent years.”

He also acknowledged that the MEK organized the protests. “MEK forces have divvied up the cities among themselves and organized protest veterans in the streets into Telegram groups in a process that has taken several years. For example, in one small town, there are over 5,000 members in various groups who have the means to coordinate a place and time for gatherings there.

Rouzi-Talab revealed the MEK’s support at home by admitting their slogans and calls being popularly chanted by the people. “Their behavior and slogans are all related to the MEK… Direct calls for overthrow, it was heard everywhere (in all cities) and was repeated frequently.”
On July 14, 2018, IRGC Brigadier General Jalali, Commander of the regime’s “Passive Defense Organization” gave an interview to the Tasnim State News Agency. He credited the MEK as the basis of the resistance movement. In this interview, he said, “We are at a very critical point in the history of our revolution… The striking issue is that all counter-revolutionaries [activities] are designed on the basis of the MEK.”

On July 21, 2018, Ali Rabiei, the regime’s Labor Minister, spoke about the MEK’s role in Iran’s labor movements. He was quoted as saying:

“Today our enemies, particularly the MEK, are targeting the labor issues in the country, something that was very apparent in the issue of the truckers… Various networks were activated to transform this demand as a protest by the MEK in the shortest possible time…”

On July 25, 2015, Mohamad Khan Boluki, Managing Director of the regime’s Transportation Union, also claimed that the MEK was responsible for the labor movement. “The majority of the people that guided the truckers’ gatherings to insurrection were from the MEK who had infiltrated this social sector,” he said.

On August 1, 2018, immediately after the renewed set of protests began, Reza Hosseini, consultant to Soft Wars HQ of the Armed Forces gave an interview with Fars News Agency in which he discussed the MEK’s increased visibility in Iran. He said, “We have to pay attention to what the MEK did in the 1980s to understand how they have resurfaced again and have advanced to the forefront and leadership stage in some sectors.”
He went on to say, “Sometimes it is said that these guys (MEK) have been killed off and don’t mention them anymore!… As an expert, I will tell you that anyone who says the MEK is dead either has a bad motive or is ignorant.”Hosseini added, “The MEK are creating waves today. They have entered into various social strata like the truckers and bazaar owners and provide them with direction.”
 
Hosseini concluded by stating the importance that the regime places on the MEK and its influence on the people of Iran: “Right now they have influence in the universities, particularly in provincial capitals. That is why we sometimes hear discourses in university settings that are the MEK’s narrative.”

On August 2, 2018, as protests picked up steam, Ahmad Salek, a member of Iranian regime’s Majlis (parliament), affiliated with the pro-Khamenei faction, spoke to Tasnim News Agency-Mullah about recent protests by workers in Isfahan: “The slogans that were chanted in the demonstration were directed by the MEK through foreign news channels.”

The running thread through all of the statements made by regime officials and experts is that the MEK – the powerful force in the Iranian resistance – is driving the protests and social upheaval taking place in the country. The regime is wrong to place the blame for the uprising at the feet of the MEK: the regime is responsible for the uprising through its corruption, cruelty, and mismanagement, and the people are rising up of their own accord. But the longstanding argument of the regime has been that the MEK is a weak organization that has no standing or power within Iran. Now that the people have risen up, it has been forced to adopt a new narrative and has contradicted itself. The MEK cannot be both a toothless organization with no internal support and a well-organized resistance that is responsible for a massive uprising and its slogans demanding freedom and democracy through regime change in Iran “being heard everywhere”.

Staff Writer

Please follow and like us:

Continue Reading

Iran Protests,IRGC,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,PMOI,Regime Change

Iran Protests in Kazerun

An Interview with Hanif Jazayeri: The Iranian People Have Spoken Loud and Clear

Recent Protests Mark a New Era for Iran’s Opposition

Recent Protests Mark a New Era for Iran’s Opposition

On the 6th of August, as US sanctions affecting the purchase of dollars, metals, and car and plane parts were re-imposed on Iran, an interview with Hanif Jazayeri was broadcast across major American cities. Listeners in Las Vegas, Baltimore, Minneapolis, New Orleans, Raleigh, and Pittsburgh could tune in to hear the Iranian news editor discuss the latest wave of economic sanctions and their effect on the already unstable clerical regime.

The United States announced its latest wave of sanctions, which will target the Iranian oil industry, the backbone of the Iranian economy; however, the EU and Russia have already voiced their opposition to the sanctions. They announced they would prefer to salvage the crumbling JCPOA agreement.

A New Breed of Protest

Hanif opened the interview by fielding a question on the changing nature of the Iranian protest movement. He said, “the Iranian people have spoken loud and clear”, “they are blaming the regime for their economic hardship”. In the wake of the JCPOA, the Iranian regime unlocked billions of dollars in aid packages, but the people saw none of the benefits.

“They have noticed this,” said Hanif, “and that is actually because all the money has been spent in Syria, to prop up the dictator there, to fund terrorist groups in the region, for the domestic suppression apparatus of the regime, and the rest of it has lined the pockets of the mullahs and their families.”

Following this blatant abuse of power and mismanagement of resources, the Iranian people have taken to the streets in their thousands to express their frustration at the mullahs’ regime. The people want an end to the regime.

The International Community

Hanif went on to mention the Iranian opposition leader, Maryam Rajavi’s appeal to the international community to impose sanctions on Iran’s oil industry and exclude the current regime from the international banking system. Only the regime’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) is benefitting from oil exports at present.

Hanif Jazayeri has played an active role himself in drumming up international support for the Iranian protest movement. He has been collecting footage from protestors in Iran and publishing them across social media to raise international awareness for the struggle of the Iranian people.

However, many within the international community have expressed reluctance and hesitation at the idea of reintroducing sanctions. A common argument against Maryam Rajavi’s proposal of sanctioning the Iranian oil industry is that it would further hurt the already struggling Iranian population.

Hanif attempted to dispel this common misconception. He cited the slogans adopted among the protestors which state, “our enemy is right here, they are lying when they say it is America”.

The people of Iran have suffered under the Iranian regime both when economic sanctions have been imposed, and after the sanctions were lifted. They saw no benefit from the lifting of the sanctions, their standard of living did not improve. Therefore, the lifting of the sanctions empowered the regime. It gave the Iranian regime more money to spend on suppressing the people.

Will Sanctions Empower Hardliners?

In response to Hanif’s argument, the interviewer countered that economic sanctions could empower the hardliners within Iran. They could be interpreted as “economic bullying” and allow the more extreme elements in Rouhani’s regime to portray Iran as a victim and being unfairly punished by the American government.

In reality, there are not hardliners and moderates within the Iranian regime. They are all hardliners. Rouhani himself has threatened to disrupt passage through the Strait of Hormuz if oil sanctions are imposed on Iran. His regime continues to arrest and execute political dissidents. There are no “hardliners” and “moderates”, only the regime in all its brutality.

Again, Hanif pointed to the slogans of the protestors to illustrate the point. The demonstrations across Iran have featured slogans stating, “no to hardliners, no to moderates”.

More than half of the country is in poverty and has been so for nearly forty years. For Iranians, the situation deteriorated after the sanctions were lifted. The regime received a financial windfall, which only gave them more resources to use in their routine abuse and repression of the Iranian people. “In the last two years, for example, the economic situation has spiraled downwards”, said Hanif.

Finally, Hanif Jazayeri saluted the brave protestors turning out across Iran, risking imprisonment and death in their determination to make their voices heard.

Staff Writer

Please follow and like us:

Continue Reading

Iran Protests,Isfahan,Karaj,MEK,MEK Network,Mujahedin-e Khalq,PMOI

Iranian regime plain cloth forces arrest a young protester in Iran

MEK Network: Fact Sheet on Protest Suppression

Iranian regime plain cloth forces arrest a young protester in Iran

A protester arrested by murderous plain cloth forces, during Iran Protest – August 5, 2018

A report based on MEK network inside Iran on the regime’s suppression of the recent protests in Iran was published recently. The protests are part of a larger uprising that has grown from economic unrest due to the fall in the value of the rial as U.S. sanctions are set to resume. Calls for regime change have been widespread among protesters in cities across the country.

 

The recent protests and demonstrations in Iran began on Tuesday, July 31st, in several cities. Riot police, security forces and plainclothes agents

were dispatched to the scenes of the protests to disperse the gatherings and subsequently beat and arrested unarmed protesters. A young man identified by the MEK network as Reza Otadi was shot and killed by security forces while protesting in Gohardasht, Karaj on August 3rd.

The MEK network has prepared a fact sheet about acts of suppression by security forces during the recent protests. The information initially published by Iran HRM has been summarized below:

Tuesday,  July 31st

Shiraz: The regime’s police force fired tear gas onto the protesters, hitting a seven-year-old boy in the face.

Karaj: Protesters were beaten by riot police and plainclothes police officers. The regime used water cannons to disperse protesters at night.

Wednesday August 1st

Isfahan: Suppressive forces maintained a heavy presence in the main streets of Isfahan, there were attacks on protesters in several areas. Protesters who had gathered underneath a bridge were also attacked by riot police.

 

Security forces in Noavaran Square stood in a row in front of protesters to attempt to block their path, then used water cannons on them to push the crowd back and disperse them. In another area, security forces clashed with protesters, firing tear gas and bullets into the crowd.

Rasht: Riot police and security forces using batons and Tasers, beat protesters severely, injuring several.

 

Karaj: Protesters were beaten by riot police and security forces.

Thursday, August 2nd

Isfahan: Riot police fired tear gas and pellet guns into a crowd of protesters. The protesters responded by throwing rocks at the police. The police subsequently fired live ammunition into the crowd, shooting a young protester in the leg.

 

Ahvaz: Agents of the regime attacked small groups of people who were standing on the street.

 

Tehran: Security forces in Valiasr Square assaulted and arrested several protesters.

 

Shahin Shahr, Isfahan: Bassij forces from the Revolutionary Guards Corps confronted and severely beat people.

Shiraz: A heavy security presence was in place in Shiraz. Security forces on motorcycles attempted to intimidate protesters by patrolling the area and attacking protesters. Plainclothes agents attacked protesters as well. Riot police fired tear gas into the crowds. Undercover agents went into the crowds of protesters to detain participants.

 

Qahdarijan, Isfahan: Riot police shot tear gas into crowds after clashes with protesters.

Karaj: Protesters were attacked on the streets by Bassij forces. Riot police fired tear gas at protesters. As night fell, riot police attempted to intimidate the protesters by marching on the street with motorcycle police following behind them.

 

Mashhad: Police shot tear gas at protesters from motorcycles and from on foot. A number of protesters were detained.

 

Friday,  August 3rd

Shahin Shahr, Isfahan: Riot police shot tear gas into crowds of protesters, as police assaulted protesters with their batons. Riot police attempted to intimidate the protesters by patrolling the streets on motorcycles. Protesters were attacked by Bassij forces.

 

Karaj: A large presence of security forces of all types was dispatched to the protests in Karaj. Many riot police were on the scene to fire tear gas and pellet guns into the crowds of protesters. Riot police also assaulted the protesters. Bassij forces, Revolutionary Guards Corps agents, and plainclothes agents attacked protesters with batons. Security forces shouted their support for the regime’s Supreme Leader while they beat the protesters.

 

Security forces opened fire into the crowd. A young man, identified as Reza Otadi, was killed by security forces in the protests. Another young man was shot in the arm and taken to the hospital for treatment.

 

Tehran: A heavy security presence was active in Tehran, with a large number of both police and plainclothes agents. Police arrested a number of people in Valiasr Square, both men and women.

 

People who filmed the protests with cellphones were arrested. Police attacked a number of people with batons and Tasers, singling out women.

 

Bujnord, North Khorasan Province: At least ten people were detained by security forces. Numerous protesters were attacked.

 

Saturday,  August 4tt

Karaj: About 100 Bassij forces and Intelligence agents posed as protesters during the day, wearing masks and participating in the protests. As night fell, riot police attacked on motorcycles and the undercover agents began arresting people, pulling the protesters’ shirts over their heads and forcing them onto a bus.

 

Qahdarijan, Isfahan: Security forces shot guns into the air.

Eshtehard, Karaj: Protesters who had gathered outside of the Eshterhard Seminary were attacked and detained by security forces.

Sunday,  August 5th

Tehran: Protesters in South Kargar Street were attacked by riot police. Numerous people were arrested.

 

Security forces were positioned in every major street to prevent any gathering.

 

Internet lines were slowed and then completely shut off for a few hours overnight. Nothing could be sent out.

Karaj: A water cannon and several different armored vehicles were brought into the streets, along with at least 30 security forces on motorcycles and almost 50 plainclothes agents in masks. All of the streets leading to Gohardasht were barricaded with cement barrier blocks. Cameras were installed in strategic locations to identify protesters. Security forces threatened store owners around Gohardasht and told them to close their shops. Bassij forces were armed with sticks, agents carried batons and other equipment, plainclothes agents carried weapons under their clothes to beat protesters. Security forces beat and detained a number of protesters. They shot tear gas into the crowd at frequent intervals. In other areas of Tehran, riot police and tanks were brought out.

 

 

 

Please follow and like us:

Continue Reading

Iran Protests,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI),PMOI

Protest in Tehran - June 2018

Uprising Points to Revolution

Protest in Tehran - June 2018

A group of protesters chant slogans at the old grand bazaar in Tehran, Iran, Monday, June 25, 2018.(Archive)

Iran is in the midst of a popular uprising, and events are developing rapidly. The uprising began in December of last year when the people of Iran took to the streets to protest the regime and its repressive policies. Many of the initial demonstrations were staged to protest economic issues, but the protests quickly shifted focus to the corruption of the regime, and people began to call for regime change. Within days, the uprising had spread to over 140 cities across every province in Iran. Cries for regime change were heard across Iran.

The regime was only able to temporarily suppress the uprising, though they used every weapon available to prevent the people from expressing their discontent. They sent the Revolutionary Guards and their surrogates to violently suppress protesters, they arrested scores of protesters, and Khamenei publicly blamed the MEK for the uprising, inadvertently legitimizing the MEK and the Iranian Resistance Movement. The uprising, needless to say, has persisted in the form of daily protests and strikes throughout the country.

Over the weekend the uprising flared up again as the rial took another nosedive days before the U.S. sanctions are set to resume. Thousands took to the streets in cities across Iran protesting for change. People chanted, “Death to the dictator!” At least one protester was killed by suppressive forces.

The gap between the rich and poor in Iran continues to widen, and the poor are forced to watch as their corrupt leaders plunder Iran’s wealth. The people have no voice to speak up about their concerns because any peaceful protest is met with violent suppression by government forces intended to silence them.

The people are done being silenced. They are willing to risk violence, arrest, torture, imprisonment, and even execution at the hands of the regime for the opportunity to protest for a better future.

The resistance is growing because the people know that they cannot stay on the path that has been laid out before them. The life they live under the Iranian regime will always be the same. They will never have the freedom they yearn for, they will never be given basic human rights, and they will always live in a society where inequality is the norm.

Iranian regime’s corrupt leadership is rotting from the inside. The factions within the regime have been fighting amongst each other for months, and they have been unable to hide their divisions from the outside world. It is clear that the regime’s leadership has no coherent vision for the country.

The people have been in the streets for the past week participating in anti-government protests. Many of these protests have turned violent. Over the weekend, there were reports of police cars and tires being burned in the streets.

People from all walks of life are being affected by the economic crisis in Iran. The poor and working classes become poorer, but the crisis has spread to the middle class as well. The middle classes are disappearing as costs rise and people’s savings are gradually diminished.

The regime has largely ignored the needs of the people and the major problems that urgently require its attention. It refuses to leave Syria or stop supporting the proxy groups around the region that it funds.

The regime is close to its downfall. It cannot continue to maintain its grip on power for much longer. The only thing needed for regime change is the support of the international community, particularly the United States.

Could this be the beginning of a revolution?

Staff writer

Please follow and like us:

Continue Reading

Iran Protests,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI),NCRI,PMOI,The Daily Express

Iran Protests in various cities in Iran

Protests Spread across Country, Iranians Call for Regime Change

Iran Protests in various cities in Iran

Credit to The Daily Express-Iran news: Protest breaks out as tires set on fire (Image: PMOI/MEK – NCRI)

Protests, strikes, and demonstrations have spread throughout the cities and towns of Iran in response to the country’s crumbling economy. Protests began early last week with a merchants strike after the rial plunged in value yet again. The rial has dropped 120 percent in the last six months alone, leading store owners to close their shops and take to the streets to protest rising costs.

The merchants were soon joined by truck drivers (who were already in the midst of a weeks-long strike of their own), farmers, workers, the unemployed, and young people. The protests spread rapidly to other cities, and calls for regime change have been widespread. Protesters have chanted, “Death to the dictator!” “Mullahs must go!” and “Rouhani be ashamed, let go of our country!”

The protests have now grown into an uprising, spreading to every major city in Iran over the past week. Protesters have confronted suppressive forces in the streets, using police tear gas to set fire to tires and police motorcycles.

Shahin Gobadi, a spoke person for the people’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (MEK) who is also a member of the National Council of Resistance of Iran’s (NCRI) Foreign Affairs Committee, gave an interview to the British website Express.co.uk. He said that the continuous nature of the Iran protests sends a clear message:

“The Iranian people are determined to bring about a regime change and they are not going to stop at anything short of that. The prospect for the mullahs to find a way out is becoming dimmer by the day.


“This is why the regime’s senior officials keep warning about the bleak prospects that loom on the horizon for the regime and the growing role of the resistance.

“As such, the regime’s official in charge of dealing with “soft warfare” stated on August 1, that 90 percent of the strikes and calls for protests are the result of activities of the “counter-revolutionaries”, ie the Iranian resistance.”

In regard to the Iran nuclear deal, Mr. Gobadi had this to say:

“It is time for the European countries to see the fast-moving realities in Iran and forgo any deals with the Iranian regime.

“Rather they should hold the clerical regime accountable for all its malign activities and side with the Iranian people and their aspirations.

“We would welcome any serious and tangible retreat by the mullahs because that would ultimately serve the interests of the Iranian people and the resistance units to bring down the regime and to establish democracy.

“But as the regime’s supreme leader, Ali Khamenei, has said time and again the regime is incapable of any major change of policies and change of direction.

“He said explicitly on May 10, 2017, that so far as the regime is concerned a change of conduct and behavior is tantamount to a change of the regime in its entirety.”

The daily Express also quoted Maryam Rajavi, the president-elect of the Iranian opposition emphasizing: ‘The Iranian people’s nationwide uprising is growing by the day. Hail to the peoples of Isfahan, Gohardasht of Karaj, and Shiraz.”

The MEK believes that the only way to bring meaningful change to the Iranian people is through regime change. The economic problems facing Iran right now are dire, but they are not new, nor are they solely a result of sanctions. The rial has been losing value since the regime took power in 1979, due to the clerical regime’s corruption and incompetence.

Staff Writer

Please follow and like us:

Continue Reading

#FreeIran2018,Free Iran 2018,Iran Protests,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI),NCRI,PMOI

Iran protest in various cities

Once Again A Nationwide Uprising Begins in Various Cities in Iran

Iran protest in various cities

Despite heavy security measure, Iran protests are spreading across the country in all major cities.

In scenes reminiscent of January 2018, on Thursday, August 2nd, the flames of protest once again fanned across Iran. Angry residents of Isfahan, Tehran, Mashhad, Shiraz, Najaf Abad, Arak, Karaj, and Ahvaz rose up as one against the tyrannical regime.

MEK Network reports: 

The people’s frustration was channeled into a litany of anti-regime slogans. In Ahvaz, brave protestors filled Naderi intersection and chanted, “our enemy is right here; they are lying that it is America”, and, “the nation is poor, while the mullahs live like a god”.

In Tehran, the protestors adopted a similar narrative. Those gathered in Vali-e-Asr Square chanted, “death to Khamenei” and, “death to the dictator”. Similar slogans could be heard from the multitude in Najaf Abad, and Shiraz, where the protestors gathered on Daryoush Street.

Strength in Numbers

It has been apparent in this latest wave of protests that the mullahs’ repressive strategies designed to prevent residents mobilizing and protesting are not working. The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and agents of the regime were on full alert following the protests the previous day.

Intelligence officials sent SMS messages to resident’s phones warning them not to partake in any protests the following day. The messages pointed at the People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK) of inciting unrest by using rising prices and a struggling economy to mobilize the population for political ends.

Despite this, and the looming threat of imprisonment and execution, the brave protestors took to the streets anyway. In Tehran, defiant protestors clashed with the security forces and the IRGC. The protestors also set fire to objects and created blockades to stop the movement of the regime’s repressive forces.

In Isfahan, protestors also clashed with the regime’s security forces. The regime’s agents attempted to disperse the crowd with tear gas, firing canisters into the crowd. To counter the tear gas, protestors burnt tires, to create a thick black smoke that would soften the burning effects of the gas.

Weapons were deployed at protests in Mashhad. The regime’s agents shot into the air in an attempt to disperse those gathered. When this didn’t work, they arrested many gathered in attendance.

The regime’s forces deployed violence to bring the situation back under control. In Isfahan, plainclothes officials attacked the protestors, but rather than be dispelled, the people fought back, fighting the regime’s mercenaries with anything that came to hand, including sticks and rocks.

Protestors Will Not Rest Until the Iranian People are Free

As images of the nationwide protests spread across social media, Maryam Rajavi, President-elect of the National Council of Resistance (NCRIhailed the people’s determination.

Rajavi offered words of encouragement to the protestors, stating, “by defying the criminal Revolutionary Guards, Basijis, and plainclothes agents once again today, the arisen women and youth represent a defiant generation which will not rest until the Iranian people and nation are free.”

Her words look likely to ring true as more cities join the movement. There is no government on earth that more powerful than a united and determined population.

Staff Writer

Please follow and like us:

Continue Reading

Foxnews,Iran Protests,Isfahan,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI),NCRI,PMOI

A protester in Isfahan resisting the IRGC forces who had attacked the protesters.

An Unstoppable Force: the Rising Tide of Iran’s Protest Movement

A protester in Isfahan resisting the IRGC forces who had attacked the protesters.

A young Iran protester shows victory sign, while joining fellow protesters to push back on repressive IRGC forces in Isfahan

On Friday, August 3rd, Fox News published an article on its website from Ben Evansky, titled “Iran’s Widespread and Growing Protests Push Citizens to Brink”. Evansky outlined the rising discontent among the Iranian population.

 

His article comes at a prominent moment. The residents of Isfahan have joined the nation’s truck drivers in their protests, and protests in Tehran continue to rage.

The economy is in sharp decline as decades of mismanagement has caused rampant currency inflation. On top of a spiralling economy, Iranian’s have to contend with water shortages and price increases for basic essentials like food and drink.

A Growing Protest Movement

Evansky describes how in these uncertain times, the Iranian protest movement is rapidly expanding. The People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK) and their activists have published footage on social media of the protests in Iran. Tehran’s residents can be heard chanting “the mullahs must get lost”.

Similar images have been released from Arak. Protestors there are using the slogan, “no to Gaza, no to Lebanon, my life for Iran” (referring to the mullahs use of Iranian finances to fund foreign conflicts and terrorist organizations abroad while Iran’s own population goes hungry and thirsty).

In his article, Evansky analyzed the slogans used by the Iranian population during the protests and discovered they provide significant insight into the opposition movement. Firstly, the women of Isfahan province are among the chanters and protestors. Fox News based on analysis of an Iran analyst, asserted that the women of Najafabad in Isfahan province “used to be a traditional bastion of regime support”. Now, these same women are in the streets shouting, “they fed Syria but made our young people turn old”.

It is not just the women of Isfahan, other segments of the regime’s support base are turning against them. The urban and rural poor, the day laborers, the farmers, and the factory workers have all joined the protest movement, uniting all segments of Iranian society in opposition.

Fox News goes on to suggest that this could be a pivotal moment for the Iranian opposition. The residents of the regime heartlands have been the mullahs’ foundations of support. Those residents are now beginning to realise that the mullahs do not have their best interests at heart. This realisation casts uncertainty on the mullahs’ future in power.

The Role of the US

Many in the US government have proposed supporting the Iranian protestors. In his article, Evansky cited a spokesman for Republican Senator Ted Cruz who said that “the United States should be doing everything possible to support these protestors”.

The US government’s stance towards the mullahs is hardening. Since Donald Trump withdrew the US from the Iran deal, he has passed a new round of sanctions, urged European nations to adopt a tougher stance, and put a resolution through Congress pledging US support to the Iranian protestors.

Falling Dominoes

The latest protests and the hardening position of the international community towards the mullahs has set in motion a series of events that will lead to the ultimate collapse of the clerical regime. Like falling dominoes, the rapidly expanding protest movement will become too great for the mullahs to repress and silence.

The President-elect of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), Maryam Rajavi, emphasized the importance of keeping the current movement going. In a statement, she exclaimed, “Iran’s risen and revolting cities are joining the protests, one after the other. The cry for freedom is becoming louder, and the uprising is expanding more and more every moment.”

Rajavi ended her statement by celebrating the powerful political force the Iranian public hold in their hands and their voices. “The is no force more powerful than the united force of young people”.

 

 

Please follow and like us:

Continue Reading

#FreeIran2018,Iran Protests,Maryam Rajavi,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI),NCRI,PMOI,trucker's protest

Protest by people of Isfahan

The People of Isfahan Stand with Iran’s Truck Drivers as the City’s Protest Enters its Second Day

Protest by people of Isfahan

A large number of protesters take to the streets of Isfahan their dissatisfaction and outrage over the high prices and plunge in rial

The truckers and lorry drivers strike has drawn attention from the Iranian population, the regime, and the international media. This attention led to large crowds in Ishafan gathering in support of the striking truck drivers.

On August 1st, 2018, the strike from owners and truck drivers in Isfahan entered its second day. As the protest spread, shopkeepers, young Iranians, and other civilians disenfranchised by the mullahs’ repressive and violent regime took to the streets. The crowd marched down the city’s main streets, chanting “death to the dictator”, “death to high prices, death to unemployment”, and “incompetent officials resign, resign”.

A National Crisis

The truck driver’s strike in Isfahan is one part of a wider, national strike, undertaken by truck drivers over poor working conditions and economic decline. The most recent national strike began on July 24th, quickly spreading to major Iranian cities, including Mashhad, Qazvin, Farrokh Shahr, and Marand.

The protests are crippling the Iranian infrastructure. Videos and images of, normally bustling, loading terminal stations in Khomeini Port sitting empty are circulating online.

The truck drivers are demanding an increase in wages, which have stagnated despite soaring inflation, lowered insurance premiums, lowered prices for replacement truck parts, and reduced highway tolls. The first round of strikes, which began in May and lasted for 11 days, did not yield results.

Commission fees have become a way for the mullahs to extort money from the nation’s truckers. The state-run ILNA news agency reported that logistics firms have to pay transport commissions of up to 10% of the cargo’s worth. Some shipment companies have been reported asking commissions up to 40%.

On top of these crippling fees, increasing fuel prices and highway tolls eat into the truck driver’s meager earnings. The state-run Mehr news agency reported that Iranian truck driver’s earnings do not adequately cover their expenses, leaving many facing financial ruin.

The Regime’s Aggressive Response

Much like the May strike, the latest round of strikes has been met with an aggressive response from the regime. In Isfahan, the regime sent its security forces to disperse the crowds and bombarded those gathered with tear gas.

The protestors in Isfahan fought back against the agents of the regime. They burnt tyres to mask the tear gas. They would not be deterred and continued their protests in the face of mounting oppression.

A Mounting Protest Movement

The trucker’s protest is just one part of Iran’s growing opposition protest movement. The People’s Mujahedin Organisation of Iran (MEK) has been a driving force behind a growing opposition movement. Maryam Rajavi, leader of Iran’s main opposition and the President-elect of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) has been instrumental in drawing support and international recognition for the Iranian opposition movement. Rajavi threw her support behind the Iranian truck drivers, and all those resisting the mullahs’ rule across Iran.

On July 31st, the people of Karaj mounted their own protest, taking over Gohardasht First Square. Again, the regime fought to bring the situation under control, but the determined people of Karaj erected barricades to block the movement of the regime’s forces.

Staff Writer

 

Please follow and like us:

Continue Reading

Copyright © 2018 MEK-Iran.com. All Rights Reserved
Assign a menu in the Left Menu options.
Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial