Posts Tagged ‘Iran Sanctions’

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MEK supporters Rally in New York against Rouhani's presence at the UNGA

Fact or Fiction? Unravelling the Truth Surrounding Rouhani’s New York Visit

Iranians demonstration in New York against Rouhani's visit 2017

The Iranian communities supporters of the MEK, demonstrate in NewYork against Rouhani’s presence to the UNGA

Separating fact from fiction in Iran’s turbulent political landscape is no easy feat. The regime floods state-sponsored media outlets with disinformation. The international free media is forced to walk a tightrope. It cannot risk angering the regime or its journalists will be harassed or have their visas revokes. There are, therefore, few outlets to find reliable information.

It is this suppression of free information that is driving the Iranian population to the brink of revolution. The mullahs’ repressive policies are creating a buildup of pressure within Iran. The whole political landscape could explode at any moment.

Rouhani’s Visit to New York

Regime President, Hassan Rouhani’s recent visit to New York was a particularly contentious issue.

He traveled to the city last week for the United Nations General Assembly, during the same week President Trump chaired the UN Security Council’s meeting on Iran.

In the state-run press, articles suggested that the two presidents were on course for conflict. The Ebtekar Daily wrote, “Tehran and Washington are on the verge of a direct confrontation”, adding, “this might be the underlying factor for many unexpected events in the future”.

There were also attempts in the state-run media to blame President Donald Trump’s speech for the continued decline of the rial. Armin state-run daily wrote, “Donald Trump severely attacked Iran’s leaders in his speech, accusing them of carrying out crimes and massacres in the region… which will have alarming consequences”.

The Iranian regime has frequently attempted to portray America as an international villain and the root of all Iran’s problems. Since 1978, state-run media outlets have broadcast stories referring to the global superpower as “the great Satan”.

The Real Culprits

So, how do we separate fact from fiction? Despite what the state-run media says, the Iranian regime is to blame for the deepening economic crisis in the country.

The regime has systematically looted Iran’s institutions, funneled money to fund foreign wars, and ploughed funding into missile programs.

Instead of using the funding released from the Iranian nuclear deal in 2016 to help the Iranian population, the mullahs used it to hold the population hostage. It used it to clamp down on political dissidents, plot terror attacks, and expand its espionage network abroad.

Although the US government has reinstated sanctions against the Iranian regime, many European heads of states have been reluctant to follow suit because of the increased economic pressure sanctions could put on the Iranian population. The Iranian people are being held as the mullahs’ hostages to prevent European nations from adopting anti-Iranian policies.

The End Goal

The US has made it clear that its goal is not to cause increased economic disruption to the Iranian people. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo outlined his government’s objectives in a recent report.

He said, “Iran is a society with so much greater potential. We want to reach a new agreement with Iran that ensures its nuclear activities are peaceful and that its role in the Middle East is constructive. We seek a deal that ensures Iran does not support terrorism around the world and provides for a greater opportunity to its own people.”

Far from “the great Satan”, the US wants to help the Iranian people. It sees a regime dragging its people towards economic ruin, abusing their human rights, and silencing the political opposition.

It also acknowledges that if the Iranian regime was going to change, it would have done so already. It knows that the mullahs’ regime will not stop abusing its population, warmongering in the Middle East, and carrying out acts of international terrorism of its own accord.

The only way to stop the mullahs and bring freedom to the Iranian people is through regime change.

Staff Writer

 

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Free Iran 2018,Human Rights,Iran Economy,Iran Protests,Iran Sanctions,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI),NCRI,PMOI,UNSC

UN Security Council

The Iranian Crisis Represents a Political Opportunity

UN Security Council

The UNSC expected to condemn Iranian regime’s human rights abuses

As the mullahs struggle to get a handle on the domestic crisis, the international community has an opportunity to apply pressure to the regime. Khamenei, Rouhani, and their cronies are in a precarious situation. They are scrambling to hold onto power, exposing their corruption, human rights abuses, and mismanagement of the national finances in the process.

Iran in Crisis

The Iranian economy is in turmoil. The rial soared to 150,000 to the US dollar, prompting a national outcry and string of public protests.

Protests have become the norm in 2018. As details of the mullahs’ economic mismanagement have come to light, the Iranian people have responded with anger and fury. Protesters chanted “death to the dictator” and “death to Rouhani” in the streets at a number of high-profile protests.

The Iranian leadership has attempted to deflect the anger. The mullahs have publicly blamed the crisis on a foreign conspiracy, fostering an image of the regime as a victim.

However, the public has remained unconvinced. Among the protestor’s chants and slogans, many describe the regime as the “enemy”. On social media, Iranians have refuted the regime’s lies, and thwarted their attempts to portray the US as the enemy.

Valuable Allies

Instead of accepting the regime’s narrative of the US and Europe as the enemies, the Iranian protesters pointed at the regime as the enemy, not the West.

Mike Pompeo, the US Secretary of State, expressed his concerns about the foiled plot against the Iranian opposition. At the People’s Mujahedin Organization of Iran (MEK) Grand Gathering event in Paris, other prominent international politicians, including Newt Gingrich from the US and Bob Blackman from the UK, made speeches at the event and lent their support to the opposition movement.

The Iranian public called on heads of states from the US and Europe to stand with them in their struggle.

As the regime finds itself increasingly threatened, it is resorting to more extreme measures to maintain its grip on power. Its mechanisms of repression and widespread human rights abuses have become even more apparent.

In August, the regime arrested around 1,000 peaceful protestors. During the nationwide protests that gripped the country in late 2017 and early 2018, the regime locked up around 8,000 civilians. Those arrested are frequently tortured, forced to sign false confessions, and kept in isolation.

Members of the Iranian resistance abroad are also in danger. MEK and Nation Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) members were the targets of two regime-orchestrated terror attacks, both of which were thwarted in the final stages.

The regime’s stifling of political expression and routine human rights abuses are having an effect on the regime’s popularity abroad. It is becoming increasingly politically isolated. The latest round of sanctions is putting the Iranian economy under intense pressure.

UNSC Expected to Condemn Iranian Regime’s Human Rights Abuses

The upcoming UN Security Council meeting on September 26th will provide another opportunity for the international community to condemn the regime’s human rights abuses. As will the 2018 Iran Uprising Summit.

Western countries share the interests of the Iranian people. Both want an Iranian government which promotes peace in the Middle East, upholds the basic human rights of its people and manages a prosperous and thriving Iranian economy.

Working together, the Iranian people and the international community can apply pressure to the regime from two fronts. The people protesting in the streets hold the regime to account internally, while the international community maintains external pressure. With this two-pronged approach, the regime would be unable to maintain its grip on power and Iran could usher in a new era of democracy.

Staff Writer

 

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Iran Economy,Iran Sanctions,Oil Sanctions

US Sanctions impact on the regime

Regime Forced to Admit Sanctions Are Effective

US Sanctions impact on the regime

The U.S. renewed sanctions are beginning to show their impact on the Iranian regime’s economy

On Tuesday, September 11th, the First Vice-President of the Iranian regime, Es’haq Jahangiri, acknowledged in a speech in Tehran that U.S. sanctions against the regime have been “highly effective.”

According to ISNA one of the regime’s official News Agencies, Jahangiri denied that Iran is currently facing a “deadlock” but said that Iran is facing a “difficult and sensitive situation.”

Jahangiri described the U.S. sanctions as “an economic war” on the regime, adding that the U.S. was also “waging a political and media war in order to influence public opinion in Iran.”
Jahangiri appears to have taken his talking points directly from regime Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, who told the regime’s Assembly of Experts last week that the United States was waging an economic and psychological war on Iran.

The recent statements stand in sharp contrast to earlier statements on the sanctions by regime officials. As recently as late August, regime President Hassan Rouhani told the Iranian Parliament: “Don’t say in your speeches that the country is facing a crisis. We have been harmed and have at times been on the verge of being harmed, but there is no crisis.”

The U.S. began re-imposing sanctions in August, and the regime’s claims that Iran was not affected became impossible to maintain in the weeks since the sanctions took effect. The Iranian regime was already in the grips of overlapping economic crises, as high unemployment, rising prices, and devaluation of the rial have fueled the popular uprising that threatens to topple the regime. These issues have worsened with the addition of U.S. sanctions and are likely to continue their downward spiral as the November 4th deadline looms for American allies to stop buying Iranian oil or face U.S. sanctions of their own. The regime can no longer pretend that Iran is on a stable course.

The United States withdrew from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal in May of this year, which triggered the resumption of sanctions against Iran. Prior to the U.S. withdrawal from the deal, speculation that the U.S. might take this action led to a steep drop in the value of Iran’s currency, the rial. The rial lost 140% of its value overnight and has steadily fallen in value since, leading to a 5.5% inflation rate in Iran in August, according to Iran’s Central Bank.

The second round of U.S. sanctions is set to go into effect on November 4th. These sanctions, which will target Iranian regime’s oil income and the ability to access the international banking system, are already beginning to affect the regime, as many international businesses rush to cut ties with the Iranian regime

rather than risk sanctions. Economic analysts, and an increasing number of officials with the Iranian regime say that the new sanctions will deeply impact the regime.

Although Khamenei and his allies would like to place the blame for Iran’s economic woes on the “poor performance of the Rouhani administration” and “profiteers,” it is becoming more and more clear that Iran’s problems stem from systemic corruption and mismanagement on the part of the mullahs.

Staff Writer

 

 

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Iran Economy,Iran oil,Iran Sanctions,MEK,PMOI

Oil purchase is dropping down as sanctions loom

Asian Oil Buyers Cease Shipments of Iranian Oil as Sanctions Loom

Oil purchase is dropping down as sanctions loom

Sanctions are having their impact on the Iranian regime’s oil revenue from its main customers in Asia

Oil refineries from Japan and India have stopped buying Iranian oil ahead of the November deadline for U.S. sanctions. JXTG Holdings Incorporated, Japan’s largest oil refinery, and its biggest rival, Idemitsu Kosan Company, have both opted not to purchase their usual supplies in October.

State-run refineries in India, including Bharat Petroleum, also opted not to book October shipments.

The United States hopes that the threat of sanctions will force the Iranian regime to renegotiate the 2015 nuclear deal. The U.S. withdrew from the nuclear deal this year and plans to reinstate sanctions against the Iranian regime in November, with the goal of reducing Iranian oil exports to zero. The people of Iran are in favor of this decision and urge the international community to join the United States in reinstating sanctions against the corrupt regime.

Why the Iranian People Support the Resumption of Sanctions Against the Iranian Regime

JXTG and Idemitsu spokespeople said that the refineries will follow their government’s guidance after talks with the United States are complete. So far, the Trump administration has not announced any waivers to the sanctions, and purchases of Iranian oil by American allies depend upon these waivers being granted. Earlier this week, Japan’s Minister of Economy, Trade, and Industry said that the country would continue negotiations with the U.S.

While government officials negotiate over Iranian oil imports, companies are left to wait for instructions from their government. Currently, some refineries are choosing not to order cargoes for the month of October, fearing that the shipments may arrive after the November 4th deadline, making them subject to U.S. sanctions.

Asian oil buyers have made at least partial orders of Iranian oil since the U.S. announced in May  that it would re-impose sanctions, but with the deadline looming, companies are severing their ties with the regime, lest they are cut off from the U.S. banking system, which would effectively prohibit a company from doing business internationally.

Oil companies in India are still in limbo. Officials at Bharat Petroleum, Indian Oil Corporation, and Hindustan Petroleum are still waiting for word from their government on how to conduct future transactions with Iran. Talks about Iranian oil imports are still in progress between India and the U.S., according to a U.S. official.

Iran Tells India Oil Exports Should Continue

Ship-owners who carry oil, those who ensure the cargo, banks who process payments for the oil, and others who handle the oil trade will also be affected by the sanctions.
The regime claims that it can find “other ways” to export its oil. Discounts and bartering could maintain some of its business, and the regime has not shown itself to be above smuggling.

Tankers are currently anchored off of the United Arab Emirates, loaded with Iranian condensate. According to traders and ship brokers, they could be waiting to be unloaded at the Jebel Ali port for use at a domestic refining complex. They could also be waiting for a vessel-to-vessel transfer.

Staff Writer

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Iran Sanctions,MEK,Mujahedin-e Khalq,Secretary Pompeo NATO

Secretary Pompeo in NATO Summit-July 2018

Pompeo Urges E.U. and U.K. to Take Firm Stance Against Iranian Regime

Secretary Pompeo in NATO Summit-July 2018

Archive Photo- Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo addresses NATO Summit

On Thursday, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo asked European leaders to support the United States in its plans to cut off the Iranian regime from the world’s energy markets, according to an AFP report.

 

Pompeo made this request during talks in Brussels at the E.U.-U.S. Energy Council at this year’s NATO Summit. In attendance were Energy Secretary Rick Perry, Saudi foreign minister Adel Al Jubeir, Iraqi PM Haider Al Abadi, and E.U. foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini.

 

Pompeo’s stated commitment at the talks was to “address the full array of threats posed by Iran” and to have the Gulf partners “work together to promote regional security and stability, and stand against Iran’s destabilizing activities.”

Iran’s list of destabilizing activities includes its support of the Houthi terrorists in Yemen, its continued use of ballistic missiles, despite a U.N. resolution prohibiting the practice, its support of dictator Bashar Al Assad and his use of chemical weapons in Syria, its interference in Iraq’s elections, and its most recent terrorist plot to attack the Iranian opposition,(MEK), at their annual gathering in Paris.

Before the talks, Pompeo tweeted:

 

“Iran continues to send weapons across the Middle East, in blatant violation of UN Security Council resolutions. Iran’s regime wants to start trouble wherever it can. It’s our responsibility to stop it.”

He followed this tweet with another just before the talks began:

“We ask our allies and partners to join our economic pressure campaign against Iran’s regime. We must cut off all funding the regime uses to fund terrorism and proxy wars. There’s no telling when Iran may try to foment terrorism, violence, and instability in one of our countries next.”

He attached a map of Europe to this tweet, marked with the location of the eleven known terror attacks that have been carried out by the regime or its proxy, Hezbollah since the regime took power in 1979.

 

The United States withdrew from the Joint Congressional Plan of Action (JCPOA), otherwise known as the Iran Nuclear Deal, in May of this year, saying that the regime had repeatedly and flagrantly violated the terms of the deal. The U.S. withdrawal from the JCPOA triggered the reinstatement of sanctions against the regime, largely affecting its oil industry, which accounts for much of Iran’s revenue.

 

The U.S. has since warned other countries to stop buying Iranian oil by November 4th or face sanctions themselves. The United States can sanction any transaction done with U.S. dollars. Almost every large transaction touches a U.S. financial institution at some point, and if it involves Iran, the United States says it will sanction that transaction. Whether the other signatories of the JCPOA comply or not might be irrelevant. The cost of doing business with terrorists will increase significantly starting on November 4th.

 

Other signatories of the nuclear deal include France, Germany, and the U. K. These countries are all attempting to save the deal, but as of right now, there is no reason to believe they can protect themselves or their companies from U.S. sanctions.

Staff Writer

 

 

 

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